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Denise Hills
Works at Geological Survey of Alabama
Attended College of William and Mary
Lives in Tuscaloosa, AL
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Denise Hills

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This is an important commentary about "benevolent sexism." It does exist, and it can harm. This also helps explain WHY I felt so irritated by a recent event at my work, ostensibly promoting women - I felt marginalized, feeling as the only way I was worthy of honor was because of my chromosomal makeup.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2012/01/31/if-it-looks-like-a-compliment-and-sounds-like-a-compliment-is-it-really-a-compliment/
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+Anna Parikka I am sure there are still real problems out there, but this type of attitude could have quite negative effects as anything could be twisted into a sexist compliment.
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Denise Hills

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Interesting article on serotonin and depression. http://n.pr/ySKk9E It's not the full answer. Anyone have any more resources on this?
The antidepressant Prozac selectively targets the chemical serotonin. When the drug was introduced in the 1980s, it helped solidify the idea in many minds that depression was the result of a chemical ...
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this source:'Serotonin Induces Long-Term Depression at Corticostriatal Synapses' http://goo.gl/L2aWj
and this source: 'The Serotonin Transporter Promoter Variant (5-HTTLPR), Stress, and DepressionMeta-analysis Revisited' http://goo.gl/7tSNA provide excellent coverage.
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Denise Hills

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As a parent of a boy and a girl, this resonates: http://ablogaboutschool.blogspot.com/2012/01/if-only-these-boys-could-be-more-like.html

G loves school. She thrives with the expectations of her (all women) teachers. When she acts up, it's in an "accepted" way. She gets rewarded for her good behavior, and responds well to it. She doesn't behave well to get rewarded, but rather because she wants to please her teachers.

K doesn't like school. Part of that is that K acts like a boy, and often then gets in trouble. Even his teachers recognize he's not a "bad" kid, he just functions differently. This year, with a male teacher, in general he's done much better. (Although I must give his current school credit - it is MUCH more accepting of his different behavior than his kindergarten school.) K doesn't respond well to a rewards-system, either - he will want to be rewarded because he's been good (for something that should just be expected) and cries foul when he is not rewarded or when rewards are applied unfairly.
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While the blog article title is clearly misleading, the article gets some of the points right. As someone who almost dropped out of high school a little bit over a decade ago, I can tell you that I barely remember any of the female teachers --- except that terrible history teacher! --- but I remember much more of the male ones; they were the ones doing cool things like holding a woodworking shop (still have that letter holder), having fun demonstrations (blowing up a big balloon full of hydrogen in class was awesome!), showing videos (still remember Marlon Brando calling out Stella), practicing English in the language lab (nothing helps with English pronunciation better than hearing yourself speak), whereas most of the female ones were just talking heads.


While I am not in the US, I have heard that they also removed a lot of the competitive elements in school under the auspices of having "no child left behind." If you are a boy who ends up in a class with a teacher reading from a book and no competition with your peers nor anything to keep your interest, why would you even go there? Just look at where the boys end up: playing video games against each other, competing for the best scores against their friends and discussing the several hundred Pokemon. Can you imagine what the kids could do if that energy was channeled towards learning rather than having them flee school towards something more interesting?
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Denise Hills

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Okay. HuffPo has issues at times, but this is important. There are not "boy" colors and "girl" colors, or "boy" games and "girl" games. There are colors, and games. Enjoy what you love!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kristen-wolfe/dear-customer-who-stuck-u_b_1190690.html
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Here, Here! Great story.
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Denise Hills

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Ahhhh.... Sitting down with a beer waiting for my Hot Holly. Got a new W&M sweatshirt, too. Not quite the same at Paul's with kids, though. But still awesome. (sorry if this is double-posted-having AT&T access issues here in the 'burg, apparently.)
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Denise Hills

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As always, mouse overs text FTW!

"Making Things Difficult" http://www.xkcd.com/996/ shared from http://bit.ly/xkcdhd
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Denise Hills

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OMG THIS IS GORGEOUS. Just. WOW.
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Denise Hills

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“slipped the surly bonds of earth and touched the face of God” explains why I want to travel to space so very badly, no matter the risk.

I think it speaks volumes that so few have been lost in manned spaced flight, with all the dangers. We are truly an amazing species, when allowed to stretch our wings and test our limits.
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I'm so glad that I lived through the era of Space exploration that I did, it gave me so many heroes to look up to and an appreciation for the ingenuity of humankind.
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Not all teachers or parents teach this way, but many do. We need to change this mindset if we want our children to succeed.
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IME as a parent, teaching my children that our society will appreciate and reward their hard work was a really useful tool. The way I did it also taught them how to make good decisions for themselves about how to achieve the kind and level of response they wanted, and the connection between choosing to do work and getting something they wanted... and that, the more they choose to do, the more they get. (And as a result, once I started using this particular system, I never ONCE had to nag them about getting their work done, and they sometimes complained that there wasn't enough!)
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Denise Hills

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Interesting. I'd like to also see poses of some men on sci-fi/fantasy covers done, too - I don't think they're as unrealistic, but I suspect they are also uncomfortable and unnatural. Probably emphasizing different attributes as well.
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+Denise J. Hills , is it wrong of me to presume you've seen this: http://fuckyeahwarriorwomen.tumblr.com/ ? It's more than just covers, but the art is awesome!
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Photos of the kids in Williamsburg. One at Crim Dell, the other two at the Wren. Ginny loved seeing where Mummy and Daddy got married!
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=^.^=
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Denise Hills

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Please keep Andy and his family in your thoughts. His stepmom died unexpectedly yesterday morning. Things are a bit delayed for the coroner, as everything shuts down in the UK for the Christmas holiday. He will be flying over Wed night, and staying for a while to help his father with whatever he can.

Wendy, we may not have always seen eye to eye, but you made Peter extremely happy. For that, I thank you, and will miss you.
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I'm sad to hear this news. I wish Andy a safe trip. Love you friend. 
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Have her in circles
1,040 people
Aimee Wilk's profile photo
Grafik Tasarim's profile photo
Krišjānis Nesenbergs's profile photo
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Andrew Warner's profile photo
BABAK SEDEHI's profile photo
Mai Woods's profile photo
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Canadian Telescopes's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Geophysicist working for the state of Alabama
Employment
  • Geological Survey of Alabama
    Geologist II, 2006 - present
  • McWane Science Center
    Outreach Coordinator, 2004 - 2006
  • Bishop Museum
    Science Educator, 2002 - 2003
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Tuscaloosa, AL
Previously
West Deptford, NJ - Newark, DE - Centreville, VA - Williamsburg, VA - Honolulu, HI
Links
Story
Tagline
NJ native, living in Alabama, Hawaiian girl at heart
Introduction
I grew up in West Deptford, NJ, moving to Northern Virginia to finish HS. I went to college at William and Mary to study geology, and went on to grad school at the University of Delaware (MS) and University of Hawaii (ABD). I met my husband Andy Goodliffe in Hawaii, and we've been married since 1998. We moved to Tuscaloosa, AL, in December 2003, for his job at the University of Alabama. I currently work for the Geological Survey of Alabama as a geophysicist.
Bragging rights
Two kids - Kieran and Geneivive (Ginny)
Education
  • College of William and Mary
    Geology, 1991 - 1995
  • University of Delaware
    Geology, 1995 - 1998
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    Geology and Geophysics, 1997 - 2002
Basic Information
Gender
Female