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Paul Kelcey
59 followers -
Software Development Manager, Architect, husband, father
Software Development Manager, Architect, husband, father

59 followers
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I migrated my personal web site recently from Yahoo to Amazon and blogged it.

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I can't believe how quickly I got an AWS server up and running and serving my web application to me. From zero experience to diving in and getting it running in about an hour. I probably spent about half that time trying to ping the server before I worked out there were security groups. Much of the other time was downloading Java and Glassfish. Better make sure I work out how to turn it off. I think I'm getting charged about 30 cents an hour.

Athena and Melina are now home and settled in. Sprint 1 "keep household going whilst Athena is in hospital" is now complete. All stories passed although there was some debate about user story 3 'keep house tidy'. Acceptance criteria are only measured against the end result (i.e. the house was tidy when she arrived home) rather than incrementally. In other words the house MAY have been messy before a last minute frantic cleaning spree BUT I still pass!

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Sprint 1 planning.
Goal: 'keep things going whilst Athena is in hospital'.
Story 1: 'keep Thomas alive'
Story 2: 'keep cats alive'
Story 3: 'keep house tidy'
Story 4: 'keep fish alive' (sorry fish, tidiness comes first apparently)
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I am wondering whether to compress then encrypt or encrypt then compress. I strongly gravitate towards compress then encrypt since compression will be much better than encrypt then compress. I'm not sure what's more CPU intensive but since compress reduces the size there's also significantly less work to do overall so this approach is likely better for performance as well.

I have a slight nag however that compressed things (a file for example) have a known or at least guessable series of bytes at the start of them. Does this weaken the security (i.e. knowing or guessing some bytes before and after encryption)? Would a certification agency say 'you can no longer be considered to support 'top secret' because you can guess the first few bytes before encryption'?

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Seems like this topic http://www.zdnet.com/blog/igeneration/summary-zdnets-usa-patriot-act-series/9233 is a hindrance to using US companies as cloud providers.
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