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#SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen - see Follet, Joyce, Interview with LORETTA ROSS:Voices of Feminism Oral History Project, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, 2004–2005, 122–124,

"Well, we rotated. We, sometimes Yulanda, sometimes Nkenge, you know. And we kind of held a whole Study Group with this group of guys. That went on for about two years. Eventually they formed a group called Prisoners Against Rape. A movie was made about these guys by some filmmaker in Minneapolis. I don’t know who or what, but through correspondence, we heard about that. They became a model for prison-based anti-rape programs.
And for the most part, people respected the rules and the guidelines. Now where it got complicated was when some of the white women started going to the prison, and then they were the ones that started breaking the rules about smuggling things to the guys and stuff. Harmless stuff. Tennis shoes or whatever stuff like that, but William had to kick a couple of guys out of the group because they had started relationships with women who had come down there through the Rape Crisis Center. Unfortunately, they were all white, the women were. And, so that was hard to manage and just — how come she was a lesbian until she met him? (laughs) you know, kind of cynical stuff was happening. But I did enjoy dealing with Prisoners Against Rape."
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The real rape statiatics.. ONLY %8 OF RAPE CASES ARE TRUE!: http://youtu.be/3Hl4c3ZqJAI #antimaleculture
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Rape Culture

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Rape Culture - filmed 1974 released 1975 featuring "Prisoners Against Rape Inc" working with the Washington DC rape crisis centre. Cambridge Documentary Films - produced by Margaret Lazarus and Renner Wunderlich.
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Rape Culture

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"Rape Culture" was first produced in 1975 and then revised in 1983. It helped to shape consciousness about sexism and violence against women. The term Rape Culture is defined for the first time and the film has played a major role in the emerging movement to combat violence against women.
 This documentary examines classic films, advertising, music and "adult entertainment," and documents the insights of rape crisis workers and prisoners working against rape.
 This was the first documentary to establish the relationship between rape and our culture's sexual fantatasies. The film shows the connections between violence and "normal" patterns of behavior. The film also attempts to expand our society's narrow and sexist concept of rape to its real and accurate limits. The notion that rape is an isolated sexual perversion, the product of an individual's deranged mind, is dispelled in this film.
 Authors Mary Daly and Emily Culpepper expand the intellectual concepts of "rapism," and help to expose the overwhelming support for rapist behavior in our culture.
 Nowhere is the relationship between rape and our culture's sexual fantasy better illustrated than in "Rape Culture's" examination of popular films and media.
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Rape Culture

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F.A.A.R. Editorial
by Jackie MacMillan, Freada Klein
Feminist Alliance Against Rape Newsletter Sep/Oct 1974

"Some of us have already begun to meet with men in prison (See PRISONERS AGAINST RAPE), with the short-term goal of getting these men out into the community to do speaking and to educate other men."
F.A.A.R. Editorial by Jackie MacMillan, Freada Klein Feminist Alliance Against Rape Newsletter Sep/Oct 1974. Anti-rape organizing began initially as a reaction against rape. Many of us are now feeling the need to stop and examine what we are doing and to engage in some self-criticism.
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Rape Culture

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In this lengthy interview, Ross details her childhood and early education, family life and sexual assault. She traces and analyzes her political evolution from black nationalism in the 1970s to liberal feminism in the 1980s, and from human rights advocacy in the 1990s to reproductive justice organizing in the present. Her account sheds light on the interplay of national and international events in women of color organizing in the U.S. (Transcript 364 pp.)
[Note on access: portions of Loretta Ross' interview are closed until 2020. The pages have been temporarily removed from the transcript and audiovisual materials are closed.]
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Have them in circles
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Rape Culture

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Rape Culture The Movie
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Save the women life
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Rape Culture

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 Quote:"Rape culture is a concept of unknown origin and of uncertain definition; yet it has made its way into everyday vocabulary and is assumed to be commonly understood. The award-winning documentary film Rape Culture made by Margaret Lazarus in 1975 takes credit for first defining the concept."

http://www.webcitation.org/6GOcYWDeS
Blackwell Reference Online is the largest academic online reference library giving instant access to the most authoritative and up-to-date scholarship across the humanities and social sciences.
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Rape Culture

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Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 10:15:39 -0500 
From: "Cambridge Documentary Films, Inc." <cdf @ SHORE.NET
Subject: Re: rape culture
In 1975, Cambridge Documentary Films, produced a film titled "Rape Culture." It included: interviews with women from rape crisis centers, women who had been raped, male prisoners working against rape inside the prisons, authors and philosophers, Mary Daly and Emily Culpepper and an analysis of media and culture starting with the movie "Gone With the Wind" and other movie to an analysis of Hustler magazine--focussing on popular myths about rape, particularly that women say "no" and mean "yes." This film was our second title, after "Taking Our Bodies Back: The Women's Health Movement" and it was very extensively used in women's studies throughout the United States and at internation feminist conferences. In the 80's we updated many parts of the film and included material from N.Y.Women Against Rape, Take Back the Night marches and the Big Dan rape trial. The term "rape culture" came out of long discussion that we had about exactly what we were trying to illustrate in the documentary and to my recollection it was the first time it was used. Subsequently we saw articles and book titles using this phrase. If anyone has any other information about the term we would be most interested. Thank you, Margaret Lazarus for Cambridge Documentary. Cambridge Documentary Films, Inc. P.O. Box 390385 Cambridge, MA 02139-0004 ph (617)484-3993 fx (617)484-0754 www.shore.net/~cdf cdf @ shore.net
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Rape Culture

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Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2000 09:34:50 -0500 
From: "Cambridge Documentary Films, Inc." <cdf @ shore.net
Subject: Re: Discourse and 'rape culture'
I appreciate Amy's clarity, especially her point about male-male rape, pointing out the power vs. gender essence of the argument. I believe that this is key to any definition of 'rape culture.' When we made the film "Rape Culture" we highlighted the actions of an organization founded in 1974, called Men Against Rape in Lorton Prison in the Washington DC area). At the time people often misinterpreted what these, primarily African American men were saying. They were talking about rape inside the prison(raping men) and out(raping women) and pointing out the similarities. It appeared that they were defining themselves as rapists but they were trying to define rape as a power relationship that took a sexual form. Only one of the 13 members of the group was actually in prison for rape. Their work, in collaboration with members of the DC Rape Crisis Center was groundbreaking. Margaret Cambridge Documentary Films, Inc. P.O. Box 390385 Cambridge, MA 02139-0004 ph (617)484-3993 fx (617)484-0754 www.shore.net/~cdf cdf @ shore.net
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Rape Culture

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Title: Prisoners Against Rape: Capitalist Economics Breeds Rape, Robbery, Murder, All Other Crimes
Authors: William Fuller, Larry Cannon
Length: 20 pages
Published: 1974
books.google.co.uk
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Rape Culture The 1974/5 Film From Cambridge Documentray Films
Introduction
"Rape culture is a concept of unknown origin and of uncertain definition; yet it has made its way into everyday vocabulary and is assumed to be commonly understood. The award-winning documentary film Rape Culture made by Margaret Lazarus in 1975 takes credit for first defining the concept."

Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology (2007) page 3791

The term Rape Culture originated in the work of "Prisoners Against Rape Inc", Lorton Reformatory Virginia and the DC Rape Crisis Centre. That history keeps being negated and even denied by American Feminists. The reasons for such negation and denial are not clear. Is it because the people fighting rape were men, or maybe because they were black. Maybe it's both.

Lorreta Ross was one of the women working with "Prisoners Against Rape Inc", and her own words speak positively and passionately about her own word and theirs. "Oh, I’ve forgotten to tell you about Prisoners Against Rape."

ROSS: And then — oh, I’ve forgotten to tell you about Prisoners Against Rape. One of the more interesting things that happened when I was at the Rape Crisis Center is that we got contacted by a group of black men who were prisoners at Lorton Reformatory. This kind of was one of the ways that Yulanda got engaged. This guy named William Fuller wrote us. William was a guy who was in prison for rape and murder. He’d been incarcerated for 15 years about that time, and he wrote this oh so moving letter, saying that while I was on the outside, I raped women. Now on the inside, I rape men. I want to stop raping. Can you help me? That’s the essence of his letter. We went, Ah, ssshhh — talk about causing a controversy.

Loretta Ross - Voices of Feminism Oral History Project - Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College

That was 1973 - 40 years later the truth is still denied. Do you stand for truth or dogma?

Is Feminist History only what some claim to be reality - or is it people's lived experience and reality? You can either be a real person and respect truth and history, or you can collude in denying history and promoting racism.