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Van Gogh Museum
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Discover the world’s largest collection of works by Vincent van Gogh at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam
Discover the world’s largest collection of works by Vincent van Gogh at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam

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“Be of good heart if things sometimes get difficult, everything will come right later on, and no one can do what he really wants in the beginning.” Vincent to his brother Theo (1873)
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#VanGoghColours The tablecloth in this painting was originally purple but has changed over time. The original purple formed a strong contrast with the yellow of the onions. What do you think of the current greyish-blue?
Red Cabbages and Onions, Vincent van Gogh (1887): http://ow.ly/K1F330dyPXp
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According to Paul Gauguin, Vincent was ‘very much in love’ with Agostina. Unfortunately she would turn out to be a source of problems.
Portrait of Agostina Segatori (1887): http://ow.ly/1OlF30dyPCo
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Who doesn't love the forest? French artists from the 19th century did for sure. They retreated to the Forest of Fontainebleau to paint their favoured motifs such as trees, vegetation and the play of light and shadow
Discover how they perceived the unspoiled landscape #IntheForest: http://ow.ly/PlYf30dyORI
Coastal Landscape, Claude Monet (1864)
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'I can’t get over the fact that I don’t have more models. Well, we must be patient and look for others.' Vincent to his brother Theo August 1888.
Railway Storage Yard, Vincent van Gogh (August 1888) http://ow.ly/QgTq30dyOBE
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One of the largest landscapes by Van Gogh. The influence of the Impressionists is clear from the bright colours and loose painting technique.
Montmartre: Behind the Moulin de la Galette (July 1887): http://ow.ly/QbPQ30dv2UK
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#OnThisDay 411 years ago Rembrandt van Rijn was born!
Vincent: ‘Rembrandt could do something else - when he didn’t have to be true in the literal sense, as he did in a portrait - when he could - make poetry - be a poet, that’s to say Creator. That’s what he is in the Jewish bride.’
The intimacy of the double portrait appealed to Vincent, and he was probably also pleased by Rembrandt’s use of coarse brushstrokes – a way of painting that saw him tear up the rulebook on how one was expected to paint in the 17th century. Two centuries later, Van Gogh would follow in Rembrandt’s footsteps.
The Jewish Bride, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn. Rijksmuseum
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The painter and draughtsman Jan Toorop organised an exhibition after Vincent’s death. ‘No sign of mockery,’ a student wrote: ‘And quite right too: my God, what sublime art this is! What colours; what fire; what a sun!’
Discover more about #VanGoghStories: http://ow.ly/Zly530duMbS
Jan Toorop, Self-Portrait (1883)
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#ArtOfTheWeek Field with Sheaves of Wheat, Vincent van Gogh (1890): http://ow.ly/Fqyg30duJCZ
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