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Allen Hildebrandt (The Heretic of Ethics)
Works at I work for The Man. Which of course means I am always fighting myself.
Attends The Devious Institutes Honorable Knighthood of Insanity
Lives in The Frozen North
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Allen Hildebrandt

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Rabbits, Easter, Eggs & Ishtar
I made this gif because I wanted to say something silly and just to ask everyone to eat in moderation these days...but oh well I got distracted by a photo which was saying:

This is Ishtar pronounced Easter. Easter is originally the celebration of Ishtar, the Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility and sex. Her symbols (like the egg and the bunny) were and still are fertility and sex symbols (or did you actually think eggs and bunnies had anything to do with the resurrection?). After Constantine decided to Christianize the Empire, Easter was changed to represent Jesus. But at its roots Easter (which is pronounced Ishtar) was all about celebrating fertility and sex.

Somehow the picture with the above text bothered me...even I'm not religious...but I really hate junk history especially if the subject gets close to my roots. 

So let's get started here..
1. Ishtar was the goddess of love, war and sex. These days, thanks to Herodotus, she is especially associated with sacred prostitution (also known as temple prostitution), which, in the religions of the Ancient Near East, allegedly took on the form of every woman having to, at some point in her life, go to the temple of Ishtar and have sex with the first stranger who offered her money. Once a woman entered the temple of Ishtar for the purpose of sacred prostitution, she was not allowed to leave until she'd done the deed.
However, her symbols were the lion, the gate and the eight-pointed star; I can't find any evidence of eggs or rabbits symbolically belonging to her. And Easter has nothing to do with her.

More about sacred prostitution:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_prostitution

2. Actually, since I know Easter gets its name from Eostre or Ostara, a Germanic pagan goddess. English and German are two of the very few languages that use some variation of the word Easter (or, in German, Ostern) as a name for this holiday. Most other European languages use one form or another of the Latin name for Easter, Pascha, which is derived from the Hebrew Pesach, meaning Passover. I personally call it Paste (in romanian).

In the Christian Bible, Jesus returned to Jerusalem from his forty days in the desert just before Passover. In fact, in the Gospel according to John, Jesus was killed on the day before the first night of Passover, at the time when lambs were traditionally slaughtered for the Passover feast (because Jesus was the Lamb of God, etc.) There are a few differing accounts of when Jesus actually died, but most Christian texts, philosophers and scholars agree that it was around the time of Passover. Easter is still celebrated the week after Passover, which is why it’s a different day each year, because the Jewish calendar is lunar rather than solar.

3. According to Jacob Grimm’s Deutsche Mythologie, which he wrote after journeying across Germany and recording its oral mythological traditions, the idea of resurrection was part and parcel of celebrating the goddess Ostara:

“Ostara, Eástre seems therefore to have been the divinity of the radiant dawn, of upspringing light, a spectacle that brings joy and blessing, whose meaning could be easily adapted by the resurrection-day of the christian’s God. Bonfires were lighted at Easter and according to popular belief of long standing, the moment the sun rises on Easter Sunday morning, he gives three joyful leaps, he dances for joy … Water drawn on the Easter morning is, like that at Christmas, holy and healing … here also heathen notions seems to have grafted themselves on great christian festivals. Maidens clothed in white, who at Easter, at the season of returning spring, show themselves in clefts of the rock and on mountains, are suggestive of the ancient goddess.”

Spring is a sort of resurrection after all, with the land coming back to life after lying dead and bare during the winter months. To say that ancient peoples thought otherwise is foolish, naive and downright uninformed. Many, many pagan celebrations centre around the return of light and the rebirth of the land; these ideas are not new themes in the slightest.
And yes, rabbits and eggs are fertility symbols, and they are, in fact, associated with Eostre.

4. Guess what language Constantine, the Roman Emperor, spoke? Not English, that’s for sure! In fact, when he was alive, English didn’t even exist yet. He would have spoken Latin, so would likely have referred to Easter as Pascha.

5. Western Easter traditions incorporate a lot of elements from a bunch of different religious backgrounds. You can't really say that it’s just about resurrection, or just about spring, or just about fertility and sex. The fact is that the Ancient Romans were smart when it came to conquering. In their pagan days, they would absorb gods and goddesses from every religion they encountered into their own pantheon; when the Roman Empire became Christian, the Roman Catholic Church continued to do the same thing, in a manner of speaking. 
And do you know why that worked so well? Because adaptability is a really, really good trait to have in terms of survival of the fittest ;)

So how about before we criticize others try to brush up on our theology & history knowledge ;)
For me Easter is just an opportunity to  make a few kids and older people happy...some kids need shoes, clothes, books, a chocolate bunny...a doll or just someone to hold them. And older people still need to smile and be happy at least in these days.

Video source for the gif:
http://vimeo.com/10668752

I'm gonna ping +Dirk Puehl  for the history facts and +Chris Roberts  for the religious insides - because I'd like their opinions about this subject.
Thanks in advance guys,

PS: Do not forget about MODERATION or I get to see you naked ;)
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Allen Hildebrandt

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Lol no you can't!
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Allen Hildebrandt

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Dawwwww..... via +Omen Enigma 
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Allen Hildebrandt

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Wicked neuroplasticity
I don't know how many of you heard about this case...but since I had an interesting conversation with a colleague about neuroplasticity, here it is an old case of a man with tiny brain.
  
A 44-year-old French man one day went to the trip to the doctor’s because he felt a pain in his left leg. He is a married man with two kids and a steady job.
Doctor’s found that he had hydrocephalus as a child (when your brain is filled with fluids) so they decided to run some brain scans.

What they found was that the majority of his head was filled with fluid. Over time, the buildup caused his lateral ventricles to swell so much that his brain had been flattened to a thin sheet.

Doctors estimated that his brain mass had been reduced by at most 70%, affecting the areas in charge of motion, language, emotion, and, well, everything.

Shockingly, he was fine. While his IQ was only 75, he wasn't mentally challenged. He held a steady job, raised a family, and didn't have trouble interacting with others.

Over time, his brain had adapted to all that pressure, and even though he had fewer neurons that most, Jacques was still a fully functional human being.

The doctors drained the fluid and while his brain is much smaller now, he is still a healthy individual with a normal life.

Reference:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn12301-man-with-tiny-brain-shocks-doctors.html#.U0-SA1WSyj9

Image:
The large black space shows the fluid that replaced much of the patient's brain (left). For comparison, the images (right) show a typical brain without any abnormalities.
Images credit: Feuillet et al./The Lancet)
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Adrianna W's profile photoChris Griffin's profile photo
 
Amazing how adaptive our bodies are not to mention life in general
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Allen Hildebrandt

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Rabbits, Easter, Eggs & Ishtar
I made this gif because I wanted to say something silly and just to ask everyone to eat in moderation these days...but oh well I got distracted by a photo which was saying:

This is Ishtar pronounced Easter. Easter is originally the celebration of Ishtar, the Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility and sex. Her symbols (like the egg and the bunny) were and still are fertility and sex symbols (or did you actually think eggs and bunnies had anything to do with the resurrection?). After Constantine decided to Christianize the Empire, Easter was changed to represent Jesus. But at its roots Easter (which is pronounced Ishtar) was all about celebrating fertility and sex.

Somehow the picture with the above text bothered me...even I'm not religious...but I really hate junk history especially if the subject gets close to my roots. 

So let's get started here..
1. Ishtar was the goddess of love, war and sex. These days, thanks to Herodotus, she is especially associated with sacred prostitution (also known as temple prostitution), which, in the religions of the Ancient Near East, allegedly took on the form of every woman having to, at some point in her life, go to the temple of Ishtar and have sex with the first stranger who offered her money. Once a woman entered the temple of Ishtar for the purpose of sacred prostitution, she was not allowed to leave until she'd done the deed.
However, her symbols were the lion, the gate and the eight-pointed star; I can't find any evidence of eggs or rabbits symbolically belonging to her. And Easter has nothing to do with her.

More about sacred prostitution:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_prostitution

2. Actually, since I know Easter gets its name from Eostre or Ostara, a Germanic pagan goddess. English and German are two of the very few languages that use some variation of the word Easter (or, in German, Ostern) as a name for this holiday. Most other European languages use one form or another of the Latin name for Easter, Pascha, which is derived from the Hebrew Pesach, meaning Passover. I personally call it Paste (in romanian).

In the Christian Bible, Jesus returned to Jerusalem from his forty days in the desert just before Passover. In fact, in the Gospel according to John, Jesus was killed on the day before the first night of Passover, at the time when lambs were traditionally slaughtered for the Passover feast (because Jesus was the Lamb of God, etc.) There are a few differing accounts of when Jesus actually died, but most Christian texts, philosophers and scholars agree that it was around the time of Passover. Easter is still celebrated the week after Passover, which is why it’s a different day each year, because the Jewish calendar is lunar rather than solar.

3. According to Jacob Grimm’s Deutsche Mythologie, which he wrote after journeying across Germany and recording its oral mythological traditions, the idea of resurrection was part and parcel of celebrating the goddess Ostara:

“Ostara, Eástre seems therefore to have been the divinity of the radiant dawn, of upspringing light, a spectacle that brings joy and blessing, whose meaning could be easily adapted by the resurrection-day of the christian’s God. Bonfires were lighted at Easter and according to popular belief of long standing, the moment the sun rises on Easter Sunday morning, he gives three joyful leaps, he dances for joy … Water drawn on the Easter morning is, like that at Christmas, holy and healing … here also heathen notions seems to have grafted themselves on great christian festivals. Maidens clothed in white, who at Easter, at the season of returning spring, show themselves in clefts of the rock and on mountains, are suggestive of the ancient goddess.”

Spring is a sort of resurrection after all, with the land coming back to life after lying dead and bare during the winter months. To say that ancient peoples thought otherwise is foolish, naive and downright uninformed. Many, many pagan celebrations centre around the return of light and the rebirth of the land; these ideas are not new themes in the slightest.
And yes, rabbits and eggs are fertility symbols, and they are, in fact, associated with Eostre.

4. Guess what language Constantine, the Roman Emperor, spoke? Not English, that’s for sure! In fact, when he was alive, English didn’t even exist yet. He would have spoken Latin, so would likely have referred to Easter as Pascha.

5. Western Easter traditions incorporate a lot of elements from a bunch of different religious backgrounds. You can't really say that it’s just about resurrection, or just about spring, or just about fertility and sex. The fact is that the Ancient Romans were smart when it came to conquering. In their pagan days, they would absorb gods and goddesses from every religion they encountered into their own pantheon; when the Roman Empire became Christian, the Roman Catholic Church continued to do the same thing, in a manner of speaking. 
And do you know why that worked so well? Because adaptability is a really, really good trait to have in terms of survival of the fittest ;)

So how about before we criticize others try to brush up on our theology & history knowledge ;)
For me Easter is just an opportunity to  make a few kids and older people happy...some kids need shoes, clothes, books, a chocolate bunny...a doll or just someone to hold them. And older people still need to smile and be happy at least in these days.

Video source for the gif:
http://vimeo.com/10668752

I'm gonna ping +Dirk Puehl  for the history facts and +Chris Roberts  for the religious insides - because I'd like their opinions about this subject.
Thanks in advance guys,

PS: Do not forget about MODERATION or I get to see you naked ;)
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Allen Hildebrandt

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While I think both should be punished equally.
Both are guilty of gross negligence in my opinion....here in Arizona the inside of the car can become 125° after less than 10 minutes. Kids and animals die too often from it. It is sad she is being treated different though.....
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Allen Hildebrandt

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I'm ready.
 
I am ready and everyone else needs to get ready, because it is coming at a faster and faster pace.
A new study out of Pew Research Center shows how Americans view the future of tech and what they're not quite ready for.
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Allen Hildebrandt

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Solar’s Insane Cost Drop That line dropping almost straight down, is the price of solar energy. Forecast it out 10 years and realize fossil fuels are pretty much doomed.

http://cleantechnica.com/2014/04/16/solars-dramatic-cost-fall-may-herald-energy-price-deflation/
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Allen Hildebrandt

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This was the version one opening cinematic, back in 2011 I think it was.
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Philosophy and Futurist
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  • I work for The Man. Which of course means I am always fighting myself.
    Philosophy and Futurist, present
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The Frozen North
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North Pole, Ak - Jötunheim
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An ethical heretic, Philosopher of little note, Professional Jackass and General Nuisance
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I'm an ecclectic assortment of interests, a philosopher, thinker, and student of the world. I look to the future.
Education
  • The Devious Institutes Honorable Knighthood of Insanity
    Professional Nuisance, 2004 - present
  • Astrids School of Eristic Obstrepory and Collegiate Inexellence
    Efficiency in Slackitude, 1996 - 2001
  • Chaotica's Post-Doctorate College of Evil and Misanthropy
    Necromantic Juggling, 2001 - 2004
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