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Ade Oshineye
A chaotic neutral point of view
A chaotic neutral point of view
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This AMP Stories experience is legit.

Weird, how a PWA experience like this made me understand the fascination with Snapchat.

In other news, I'm slow on the uptake.
https://www.ampproject.org/stories
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Google Photos generated a panorama #shotonpixel2 as I was leaving the first day of #AMPConf2018 in Amsterdam
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Visually immersive stories are all the rage today and "Stories" are popping up in your favorite apps. Now, they're platform independent and on the web.

No longer do you need to use WhatsApp, FB Messenger, FB, Instagram, Snapchat, BeepBoop, SwallaZing, or BiggieDerp to get your favorite news stories in visually appealing and immersive ways. Now you can just do a search on Google and view them on the mobile web. What a time to be alive.

There's only a handful of publishers using the platform right now, but this will grow as time moves forward.

Publishers involved in the early development of the AMP stories format — CNN, Conde Nast, Hearst, Mashable, Meredith, Mic, Vox Media, and The Washington Post — have brought together their reporters, illustrators, designers, producers, and video editors to creatively use this format and experiment with novel ways to tell immersive stories for a diverse set of content categories.
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AMP is coming to email! #ampconf #boom
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Hanging out at the AMP Conference 2018 in Amsterdam
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Come for the Marxism but stay for the Culture/Borg equivalence arguments. Bonus points for noticing the subtextual reference to Michael Eddington from DS9.

"""In fact, modern science fiction writers have had so little to say about the evolution of culture and society that it has become a standard trope of the genre to imagine a technologically advanced future that contains archaic social structures. The most influential example of this is undoubtedly Frank Herbert’s Dune, which imagines an advanced galactic civilization, but where society is dominated by warring “houses,” organized as extended clans, all under the nominal authority of an “emperor.” Part of the appeal obviously lies in the juxtaposition of a social structure that belongs to the distant past – one that could be lifted, almost without modification, from a fantasy novel – and futuristic technology.

Such a postulate can be entertaining, to the extent that it involves a dramatic rejection of Marx’s view, that the development of the forces of production drives the relations of production (“The hand-mill gives you society with the feudal lord; the steam-mill, society with the industrial capitalist.”1). Put in more contemporary terms, Marx’s claim is that there are functional relations between technology and social structure, so that you can’t just combine them any old way. Marx was, in this regard, certainly right, hence the sociological naiveté that lies at the heart of Dune. Feudalism with energy weapons makes no sense – a feudal society could not produce energy weapons, and energy weapons would undermine feudal social relations."""
From the article: "Given all these options, how do you choose? More fundamentally, who are you? What is it that creates your identity, or that makes you distinctive? If we reflect upon our own lives, the significant choices we have made were all in important ways informed by the constraints we are subject to, the hand that we were dealt: our natural talents, our gender, the country that we were born in. Once the constraints are gone, what basis is there for choosing one path over another?"

[...]

"The other option is moral affirmation of freedom itself, as the sole meaningful value. This is often accompanied by a proselytizing desire to bring freedom to others.

"Because of this, there is a very powerful tendency within liberal societies for the development of precisely the type of 'secular evangelism' that Banks described. It acquires a peculiar urgency, because it serves to resolve a powerful tension, indeed to resolve an identity crisis, within modern cultures. It often becomes strident, in part due to a lingering suspicion that it is not strong enough to support the weight that it is being forced to bear."
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