Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Thomas Sering
1,822 followers -
Data & Common Sense
Data & Common Sense

1,822 followers
About
Thomas's posts

Post has attachment
Seven Ways That Even The Smartest Companies Kill Great Ideas

Ah...one of these 7-this, 5-that and 10-other things posts...makes me wonder how innovative content writers are these days :)

► Inc.com: http://bit.ly/1DDzIop
Photo

Post has attachment
EU comission's Digital Single Market Strategy leaks - and it isn't all terrible

I know there is a reflex to immediately criticise just about anything that comes out of Brussels but this one is could be good news for SMEs. While it remains to be seen what they'll eventually deliver, the evidence file shows that the commission has understood the challenges of the digital economy - and the fact that Europe is trailing far behind.

Personally, I'd recommend to take some time and read the leaked documents but those who are too busy might be interested in this short summary by Politico (with links to the originals): http://bit.ly/1Kkc8la
Photo

Post has attachment
Much more significant that all that mobilegeddon panic. We either have a web of extremely effective websites or most of them aren't fit for purpose. I'd say it's the latter.

Post has attachment
"Stiglitz wrote in a Guardian article last autumn: “Regardless of how fast GDP grows, an economic system that fails to deliver gains for most of its citizens, and in which a rising share of the population faces increasing insecurity, is, in a fundamental sense, a failed economic system.”

Post has attachment
"The problem with “I’m entitled to my opinion” is that, all too often, it’s used to shelter beliefs that should have been abandoned. It becomes shorthand for “I can say or think whatever I like” – and by extension, continuing to argue is somehow disrespectful. And this attitude feeds, I suggest, into the false equivalence between experts and non-experts that is an increasingly pernicious feature of our public discourse..."

"Oceania was at war with Eurasia: therefore Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia. The enemy of the moment always represented absolute evil, and it followed that any past or future agreement with him was impossible."

Post has attachment
Guess it's a tiny step but worth signing nonetheless.

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
Mathematically Defined Crypto-Currencies has been published by Barry Kort


There has been a lot of attention on BitCoin of late, and a number of my correspondents have been digging into the topic.

I was looking for some good analogies through which to understand the idea and the dynamics of BitCoin and similar mathematically defined crypto-currencies. This is my first shot at constructing such an analogy.

In this model, I think of the economy (the exchange of goods and services) to be an intricate clockwork mechanism. Everything is connected to everything else. Energy flows through the gears, allowing the machinery to operate at some level of speed and efficiency to move things along.

Any economy, like any clockwork mechanism, has friction. Energy needs to be supplied to overcome the friction, and that energy eventually degrades to heat as the state of the clockwork mechanism evolves over time.

One can improve the efficiency of the machine by applying a high quality lubricant. With a good lubricant, there is less friction, and less energy is needed to drive the machine.

In an economy, money is the lubricant that allows the machinery of commerce to operate efficiently. That’s the function of money: to act as a lubricant for the gears of the economy.

Suppose an inventor devises a super-lubricant that outperforms all current lubrication technologies. What happens? In an ideal world, everyone upgrades to the new lubricant and it soon takes a lot less energy to keep the clockwork machine running smoothly.

What could possibly go wrong?

The problem is that manufacturing the new lubricant is not free. Just as it takes energy to overcome friction, it also takes time and energy to manufacture the super-lubricant. And so there ensues a “gold rush” to manufacture this wonderful new super-lubricant.

Eventually, those who got in the game early end up owning barrels and barrels of this valuable super-lubricant. The problem is, they are not using it to lubricate the mechanism. Rather they are hoarding it because its market value is rising. As a result there is a shortage of lubricant in the clockwork mechanism. The material economy is not yet benefiting from the new super-lubricant because very little of it is being released into the gears of the machine. Most of it is simply being hoarded in privately owned barrels whose value on paper is rising.

But if and when all that hoarded lubricant is released into the clockwork machinery of the real economy, two interesting things will happen. The real economy will operate more efficiently (and that’s a good thing) while the price (or value) of the (now increasingly abundant) super-lubricant will drop. When that happens, the late-comers to the gold rush game will find that they unwisely spent a lot of resources in vain to manufacture or purchase small amounts of the once scarce lubricant that has now become cheap and plentiful.

Does this analogy work? How can it be refined or improved? 
Photo

Post has attachment
This article takes the whole privacy discussion up to a level where it belongs. "No progress can be achieved,..., as long as privacy protection is “more or less equated with an individual’s right to decide when and which data are to be accessible.” - It's a must-read, must-share, must-act-upon essay trying to answer what should be done and why. 

"Habits, activities, and preferences are compiled, registered, and retrieved to facilitate better adjustment, not to improve the individual’s capacity to act and to decide.

Whatever the original incentive for computerization may have been, processing increasingly appears as the ideal means to adapt an individual to a predetermined, standardized behavior that aims at the highest possible degree of compliance with the model patient, consumer, taxpayer, employee, or citizen."
Wait while more posts are being loaded