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NatureScapes.net
391 followers -
The Resource for Nature Photographers
The Resource for Nature Photographers

391 followers
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Forgoing a tripod can be fun and can yield some unique images. One thing to try, especially in flower season, is something called “meadow-diving.” It’s a close-up photography technique using a close-up or zoom lens with diopters attached. Set your lens for its maximum magnification and use your widest aperture. This will give you the faster shutter speeds that you’ll need to stop both camera and subject motion. It will also give you a very shallow depth of field.

With this technique, you “dive” into your subject, creating close-up abstracts of the insides of flowers, dandelion puff-balls, grasses, or anything you like. Disable auto-focus and don’t use your focusing ring. Move yourself and the camera back and forth to focus, firing the shutter when you see what you like in the viewfinder. Try to have at least one point of sharp focus in your image, as our eyes need something to focus on. Keep in mind the shallow depth of field and try to keep the back of the camera parallel with your subject to maximize depth of field if the subject calls for that.

© Rod Barbee

#photography #phototips #flowers
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What backpacks do you recommend for air travel, long walks, and small setups? Discussion going on now: http://ow.ly/jMeJ3096NVF

#photography #backpacks #photogear
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Have a great weekend, everyone!
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Today Alan and Greg’s bird photography workshop at Laguna Seca Ranch begins!

Participants will learn the best way to locate and get images of many different bird species. We’re already scheduled for next year; check it out if you’d like to join up in Texas: http://ow.ly/RCwC308Tfqm

© Greg Downing

#photography #workshop #birds
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One of our latest groups of workshop participants at the entrance to Yellowstone National Park earlier this month. Thank you so much to everyone who joined us! www.naturescapes.net/workshops

#photography #Yellowstone
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Svalbard polar bear wanders on ice during late afternoon. Image details: http://ow.ly/9bTE308TdmK

© Steve Kaluski

#photography #wildlife #Svalbard
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Fall in love with a new wildlife location this year. NWF has put together a list of their favorites: http://ow.ly/hYoA308TbYO

#photography #wildlife #adventure #travel

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When photographing nature in the tropics, preparation is the key to being successful and it all starts before you board the airplane. In the tropics, certain species are highly localized and furthermore may only be present for portions of the year. Learn the weather patterns of the places you plan to visit and figure out which locations are the most promising for photography.

Tandayapa moth © Glenn Bartley

#photography #phototips #travel
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“Pandas are undoubtedly very photogenic, but they can be a pain to photograph. This particular one was sleeping high up a tree, and I immediately liked the panda, the tree, and the background. All I needed was for it to wake up, even if only for a few seconds. Right. Well, it appears that pandas can sleep for a very long time. But I was determined to get the shot, because some law says that once you decide to give up and pack up your gear, amazing stuff will happen. So I waited for what seemed like an eternity in the blazing sun, sweating like the proverbial pig. This strategy doesn't always work, but I'm happy it did this time. Not only did the panda wake up just before I gave up, it turned towards me in what without a doubt is the nicest panda pose I've ever seen. Good things come to those who wait. Sometimes.”

Image details: http://ow.ly/AwDA308TbIB

© Marsel van Oosten

#photography #wildlife
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