Profile

Cover photo
Ravens Power AG
74 followers|9,175 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

 
 
Sandra Wöhe is a German-language novelist, journalist and columnist. Her articles are published in Switzerland, Germany and Austria.

I just discovered her Facebook fan page and liked it!
https://www.facebook.com/sandra.woehe.autorin 
1
Add a comment...

Ravens Power AG

Shared publicly  - 
 
Is a Future With High Renewable Electricity Production Really Possible?

"There continues to be a large amount of skepticism as to whether or not a promising renewable electricity future exists using solar and wind generation. Peter Bronski, with Rocky Mountain Institute, explains why the future is indeed promising and highlights the progress that has already been made in the field."

The 'Renewable Electricity Futures Study' points to an 80-plus percent renewables future, in which 60 percent of electricity generation comes from wind and solar; hydro provides about 12 percent, with biomass and geothermal making up the remainder.
1
Add a comment...

Ravens Power AG

Shared publicly  - 
 
Google managed to build functioning driverless cars.

Google has very nearly perfected a fleet of driverless cars.

Google employees have driven themselves hundreds of thousands of miles with a perfect safety record in all sorts of settings, including heavy city traffic and poor road conditions.

A four-way stop?

Parallel parking?

No problem.

They've crossed the Golden Gate Bridge.

They've driven around Lake Tahoe.

Forbes reports that a Google car successfully navigated the famously steep and crooked Lombard Street in San Francisco.

The Google system has been built into a half-dozen Toyota Priuses, three small Lexus SUVs and a snappy little Audi TT.

At the heart of the system is a $70,000 lidar system (laser radar) and a series of other sensors, in addition to digital maps.

The system allows a human driver to take control by touching the brake or turning the steering wheel.

All in all, the driverless system has a current sticker price of about $150,000.

In May, federal Transportation Department regulators issued policy meant to advance driverless-car testing and to help spur the creation of "precursor" technologies, such as vehicle-to-vehicle communications.

What do you think?
1
Add a comment...
 
Third industrial revolution in action by our friends, domestic animals, eels, ...
 
An electric eel that powers your lights at home? #japanesetech 
1
Add a comment...

Ravens Power AG

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
We love big machines!

+1 if you know what this is....
1
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
74 people
Merrie Cripe's profile photo
DHARAM SINGH's profile photo
Lucas Wyrsch's profile photo
namal hettiarachchi's profile photo
DIEM TRAN's profile photo
Gilang Ponorogo's profile photo
Lucas Wyrsch's profile photo
Ariadna Troncoso's profile photo
Frank Galley's profile photo

Ravens Power AG

Shared publicly  - 
 
In 2013 at least four US nuclear power plants will close earlier than expected!

All US nuclear power plants were designed in the 1960ies and 1970ies!

The DJIA between 1960 and 1979 went nowhere!

After the 1979 Three Miles Islands nuclear accident, the US decided a nuclear moratorium with no new nuclear power plant constructed!

The DJIa between 1980 and 1999 increased from 750 index points in early 1980 to 11,150 index points at the end of 1999!

In 2001 a nuclear renaissance was started on a global scale and we had two major global financial crisis:

The early 2000 global financial crisis and
The late 2000 global financial crisis!

Is commercial use of nuclear power always generating a Lucas wedge that is at least 50 times higher than the real kWh paid by consumers?

What do you think?
2
Add a comment...

Ravens Power AG

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The developed world has both the means and the technology to bring carbon emissions under control. It should lead by example...

#climatechange   #eco   #technology  
1
Add a comment...

Ravens Power AG

Shared publicly  - 
 
“Data is power – and data about power is money in the bank!”

Many data centers have large gaps in what they know about their own use of electricity.

Even for a modest-sized data center, the resulting inefficiencies can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars per year.

That’s why ABB recently released a Whitepaper that deals with all the savings that may result of monitoring AND understanding the information of the use of energy.

The first step, Clemens Pfeiffer, CTO of Power Assure, an ABB partner says, is to develop a full understanding of how electricity is being consumed by undertaking monitoring, analysis and management of the center’s electrical use.

While the easiest improvements often lie in cooling systems, the largest energy savings are likely to be found in IT, he notes.

“Data centers use a lot of energy to manage information.

When they carefully manage information about their use of energy,” Pfeiffer says, “they almost always find it’s possible to do a better job at less expense.”
 
'The largest energy savings are likely to be found in IT...' Clemens Pfeiffer - CTO of Power Assure

#bigdata   #datacenter   #energyefficiency  
1
Add a comment...
 
 
Connecting the power of wind to the grid!

#renewableenergy  
1
Add a comment...

Ravens Power AG

Shared publicly  - 
 
As Price of Nuclear Energy Drops, a Wisconsin Plant Is Shut

By Matthew L. Wald - New York Times, May 7, 2013

WASHINGTON — The Kewaunee nuclear power plant in Wisconsin shut down for the last time on Tuesday, but it is preparing to break new ground for the American nuclear industry.

It may go to sleep, Snow White-style, for 50 years, to be awakened when its radioactivity has subsided. Or it may be dismantled in the next decade or so. In either case, the responsibility and the expense, probably near $1 billion, will be borne for the first time by a for-profit company, not a regulated utility.

The Kewaunee plant, which opened in 1974, was sold in 2005 to Dominion, based in Richmond, Va., by its owners, the Wisconsin Public Service Corporation and Wisconsin Power and Light. In the past, the lengthy decommissioning process that nuclear power requires was in the hands of local companies, which have had the option to go to a public service commission and ask for a rate increase to pay for the job if it proved unexpectedly difficult.

But Kewaunee was a “merchant” plant, a sort of free agent on the grid, selling its electricity on contract, at a price set by the market, not by the government.

Dominion says it has reserved enough money to do the job, and a big enough bank account if the reserve fund does not suffice. So far, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission agrees, although a commission expert said the actual budget was open to question. But “when you try to do any of these calculations beyond seven years, I’ll be frank with you,” said Michael Dusaniwskyj, an economist with the commission. “It’s a shot in the dark.”

The variables for Kewaunee, which is about 35 miles southeast of Green Bay, include the amount it can win in a legal dispute with the Energy Department, which was supposed to start taking away the spent fuel more than a decade ago but will not begin doing so for many years to come. Other factors are the scrap value of the tons of steel and copper in its equipment and structure, and the rate of return it can earn, above inflation, on the $578 million reserve Dominion has set aside.

Three Wisconsin state agencies said they had had no jurisdiction since the public service commission approved the sale of Kewaunee eight years ago. That does not mean that no one is concerned.

“It’s a strange situation for sure, for Wisconsin, which has very little to do with a decision made by another entity, and it’s going to be around for another 60 years,” said Charles Higley, the director of the Citizens Utility Board, a nonprofit agency that seeks to represent residential consumers, farmers and small businesses before the public service commission.

But the chief nuclear officer of Dominion, David A. Heacock, said his company projected that the money on hand would be enough, even before recovering money from the Energy Department, which it estimates could amount to $350 million, or the income from the sale of scrap metal.

Still, the retirement comes at a time of rapid cost inflation. Last month, Mr. Dusaniwskyj told stock analysts in a conference call organized by UBS Investment Research that the utilities’ estimate of the cost of decommissioning was rising 8 to 9 percent a year, pushed by the cost of burying the lightly contaminated concrete and steel. That cost could change markedly in coming years, depending on whether more low-level radioactive waste dumps open.

Representative Edward J. Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, said in a letter sent to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Monday that several reactor owners had recently filed documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Those documents indicated that their plants were worth far less than previously assumed, since the market price of the electricity they produced had dropped sharply because of low natural gas prices. (That is what made Kewaunee unprofitable.)
Earlier this year, he pointed out, the owners of the Crystal River 3 plant in Florida decided to retire it rather than repair its containment structure, because of unfavorable economics. Industry experts say that several reactors are operating at a loss while their owners wait for the glut of natural gas to disappear. How long that will be, and how many will last, is not clear.
“Once these old nuclear reactors shut down — as we’re seeing now — it will take 60 years and hundreds of millions of dollars to decontaminate them,” Mr. Markey said in a statement.

“Taxpayers should have assurances that these nuclear relics don’t outlive their corporate owners and their ability to fund nuclear cleanup costs, leaving ordinary Americans to foot the bill.”

The concern is relatively new because in the past, reactors were locally owned, so their economic benefits — or their costs — accrued for a population that a utility could appeal to for money if it ran short. Mr. Heacock noted, however, that this was never assured. A public service commission might tell such a utility,

“you collected the money already, you figure out how to make it work, or go to your shareholders for the difference,” he said.
Dominion filed plans in February to shut down the reactor. Mr. Heacock said that the experience of another company, Energy Solutions, which is decommissioning Commonwealth Edison’s old Zion reactors north of Chicago, was that it might be cheaper to do the job in the next decade or so.

Decommissioning Kewaunee will require equipment that is available now, and also human skills, including the intimate knowledge gained by workers who have been at the site for years. “After 10 years, people knowledgeable about the plant were no longer around,” he said of the Zion reactors.

What do you think?

Is nuclear energy too expensive?

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/08/business/energy-environment/kewaunee-nuclear-power-plant-shuts-down.html?smid=go-share
1
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
74 people
Merrie Cripe's profile photo
DHARAM SINGH's profile photo
Lucas Wyrsch's profile photo
namal hettiarachchi's profile photo
DIEM TRAN's profile photo
Gilang Ponorogo's profile photo
Lucas Wyrsch's profile photo
Ariadna Troncoso's profile photo
Frank Galley's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Phone
+41 41 511 00 85
Email
Address
Ravens Power AG Postoffice Box 3441 CH-6303 Zug Switzerland
Story
Tagline
Ravens Power AG empowers sustainable energy for all!
Introduction

Ravens Power AG is a Swiss company that is trading in electricity through renewable sources of energy like wind, solar, water and geothermal power.

Ravens Power AG administrates and operates utility companies.

Ravens Power AG offers consulting and engineering in alternative, sustainable and renewables sources of energy, optimized electricity mix between direct current and alternating current, smart metering, smart grid, energy efficiency, energy storage, batteries, thermocouples, solar cells, and commutator-type electric machines of the dynamo type, conduction, wire, semiconductors, insulators, vacuum, electron or ion beams.

Ravens Power AG offers substitution engineering designs, solutions, plants, processes and products to enable public and private companies to phase out from commercial use of nuclear and fossil sources of energy!

Ravens Power AG stands for a better use of natural resources through a sustainable use of renewable sources of energy.

Specialties

renewable energy, trading, administration, consulting