Profile

Cover photo
174 followers|48,589 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
Who Uses NASA Earth Science Data?

Dr. Nancy Glenn, Professor, Department of Geosciences and Director, Boise Center Aerospace Laboratory (BCAL), Boise State University

Research interests: Using remotely sensed data to analyze and characterize ecosystem responses to human activity with a focus on dryland ecosystems and the response of these areas to disturbance and climate change.

Research highlights: It is easy to overlook waxflower (Jamesia tetrapetala). This fragrant flowering shrub clings to alpine and subalpine cliffs and rock slopes at elevations between roughly 2,100 and 3,400 meters (about 6,900 and 11,100 feet) and stands about 3-10 decimeters (about 1-3 feet) tall. But if you happen across this small shrub with the four-petaled white flowers in the wild you know you are in the Great Basin of the United States. Waxflower is one of about six plant species found only in the Great Basin, and nowhere else in the world, according to the U.S. Forest Service. This region, and the plant and animal species within it, is extremely sensitive to the effects of climate change, human development, and excessive water use. Dr. Nancy Glenn conducts research and leads research teams to help quantify the sensitivity of the Great Basin to these effects.

To read the full profile, https://earthdata.nasa.gov/user-resources/who-uses-nasa-earth-science-data-user-profiles/user-profile-dr-nancy-glenn
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
New Data Chat Released-Talking about NASA’s EOSDIS Earth Science Data Collection with NASA Program Executive Kevin Murphy

NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) currently archives more than 17.5 petabytes of Earth science data collected from satellites, airborne campaigns, and field observations. The more than 11,000 unique data products produced from these data represent one of the largest collections of Earth observing data in the world. Overseeing the ingesting, processing, archiving, and distributing of these products is one of the many responsibilities of Kevin Murphy, the Program Executive for Earth Science Data Systems within NASA’s Earth Science Division. The fact that all of these data are delivered under a free and open data policy entails a number of unique challenges for Mr. Murphy and NASA, along with the prospect of exciting new products being available in the not-too-distant future.

To read the full story, https://earthdata.nasa.gov/user-resources/data-chat/data-chat-kevin-murphy
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
Who uses NASA Earth Science Data?

Dr. Xiaofeng Li, Scientist; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)

Research Interests:Using remote sensing data, primarily synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, to study atmospheric and oceanic processes.

Research Highlights: Radar is a simple concept—radio waves are sent out and their time and power of return are calculated to determine the range, angle, velocity, and characteristics of objects off of which the radar beam bounces. Synthetic aperture radar, or SAR, bounces a microwave radar signal off Earth’s surface to detect physical properties. While the word “aperture” when used in reference to an optical instrument like a film camera refers to the size of an opening in a lens that lets light in, the term “aperture” in radar use refers to the antenna generating the microwave pulses. In general, the larger the radar antenna, the more information and better surface resolution the radar can produce. Since antenna size is limited on satellite instruments, scientists use the spacecraft’s motion along with advanced signal-processing techniques to simulate a larger antenna and create high resolution images. This is where the “synthetic aperture” comes from. Significant advantages of SAR are that it can create high resolution images without the need for illumination (such as from the sun) and can penetrate clouds, fog, tree canopies, or other obstructions to create these images. This makes SAR ideal for use in Earth observing satellites.

Dr. Xiaofeng Li uses SAR data to study a wide range of processes occurring in the atmosphere and ocean, including air-sea interactions, ocean surface winds, waves, coastal upwelling, oil seeps, and tropical cyclones. In fact, SAR has been used to observe tropical cyclones since the launch of the first satellite-borne SAR aboard NASA’s Seasat mission in 1978. SAR reveals visible tropical cyclone features like eye structure, rain bands, and arc clouds, as well as features that may not be visible, such as the presence of high winds within a cyclone’s eye. Dr. Li and his colleagues use SAR to better understand tropical cyclone morphology as well as to help determine physical parameters including wind speed and direction, rain rate, and eye location, all of which help improve cyclone tracking and intensity predictions.

To read his full profile,
https://earthdata.nasa.gov/user-resources/who-uses-nasa-earth-science-data-user-profiles/user-profile-dr-xiaofeng-li
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
This webinar represents the encore presentation of the webinar held on 11/21/16. During this webinar we discuss remotely sensed environmental indicator data sets that can enable environmental decision making. We focus on three major issue areas: ambient air pollution, coastal eutrophication and biomass burning.

Detailed Information: There is a high demand for environmental indicators in policy and management contexts, yet serious data deficiencies exist for many parameters of interest to environmental decision making. With its global synoptic coverage and the wide range of instruments available, satellite remote sensing has the potential to fill data gaps. This webinar presents results of a NASA-ROSES pilot study to develop satellite-derived indicators in three major issue areas: ambient air pollution, coastal eutrophication, and biomass burning. The presentation describes what makes an indicator that passes muster with policy and technical audiences and the underlying satellite data and methodologies. The presentation will also cover several SEDAC data holdings that are derived from satellite data: time series global grids of PM2.5 (particulate matter at 2.5 microns), a global urban heat island (UHI) data set, and forthcoming time series global NO2 (nitrogen-dioxide) grid and global fire emissions indicators.

For more information about NASA SEDAC, http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu
2
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
During this webinar we discuss remotely sensed environmental indicator data sets that can enable environmental decision making. We focus on three major issue areas: ambient air pollution, coastal eutrophication and biomass burning.

Detailed Information: There is a high demand for environmental indicators in policy and management contexts, yet serious data deficiencies exist for many parameters of interest to environmental decision making. With its global synoptic coverage and the wide range of instruments available, satellite remote sensing has the potential to fill data gaps. This webinar presents results of a NASA-ROSES pilot study to develop satellite-derived indicators in three major issue areas: ambient air pollution, coastal eutrophication, and biomass burning. The presentation describes what makes an indicator that passes muster with policy and technical audiences and the underlying satellite data and methodologies. The presentation will also cover several SEDAC data holdings that are derived from satellite data: time series global grids of PM2.5 (particulate matter at 2.5 microns), a global urban heat island (UHI) data set, and forthcoming time series global NO2 (nitrogen-dioxide) grid and global fire emissions indicators.

For more information about NASA SEDAC, http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
Who Uses NASA Earth Science Data? She does to study mountain ecosystems and impacts on water supply!

Dr. Anne Nolin, Professor; College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences; Oregon State University

Research interests: Mountain hydroclimatology, remote sensing of snow, and mountain social-ecological systems.

Research highlights: It is impossible to underestimate the importance of mountain snowpacks and associated glaciers to water resources. As Dr. Anne Nolin notes, snowpacks and glaciers are the lifeblood of the western U.S. and similar regions around the world, storing water in winter and gradually releasing this water during spring (from snow) and summer (from glaciers) as the snow and ice melt. Dr. Nolin’s work on snowpack and mountain environments attempts to map, monitor, and characterize these vital ecosystems.

Satellite remote sensing data are a critical component of Dr. Nolin’s research. Not only do these satellite data provide imagery of remote, often inaccessible mountainous areas, they also provide data for computer models designed to mathematically represent environmental conditions and are used to update these models as they run. In addition, Dr. Nolin and her colleagues use remotely-sensed data to validate model output and augment snow information from ground-based mountain monitoring stations, which may be few in number, spread out over large distances, or difficult to reach.

Research by Dr. Nolin shows that global warming is leading to changes in these ecologically sensitive regions. These changes affect not only mountain ecosystems, but also the resources that flow from mountain regions. As Dr. Nolin and her colleagues observe, “Mountain snowpack is a key common-pool resource, providing a natural reservoir that supplies water for drinking, worship, hydropower, agriculture, ecosystems, industry, and recreation for over 1 billion people globally.” Changes in these snowpack resources also affect the human mountain communities depending on these resources. Dr. Nolin’s work seeks to understand mountain regions as a system that couples human dimensions with these biophysical areas.


To read her full profile, https://earthdata.nasa.gov/user-resources/who-uses-nasa-earth-science-data-user-profiles/user-profile-dr-anne-nolin
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
The NASA EOSDIS 2016 Data User Profile Yearbook is Released

NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is pleased to present the 2016 EOSDIS Data User Profile Yearbook. From investigating the effects of biomass burning in Sub-Saharan Africa to testing predictions of the theory of general relativity, EOSDIS data users are applying NASA Earth observing data to a wide range of research. The EOSDIS Data User Profile series showcases these scientists, researchers, managers, and educators alongwith the data products that make their work possible. Our Data User Profile Yearbook gives you a taste of the breadth of research enabled by the vast NASA EOSDIS data collection.

To read or download this year's edition, visit:
https://earthdata.nasa.gov/2016-eosdis-user-profile-yearbook
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
Why should #NASA study #Earth? Read NASA's Sensing Our Planet 2016 to find out. https://goo.gl/I0bdPC 
NASA Sensing Our Planet 2016 features 30 researchers from Australia, Italy, United Kingdom, USA, and Venezuela
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
Global Land Ice Measurements from Space: Observing Glaciers Using ASTER

A new 'Data in Action' story has been released at the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC).The Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) project monitors all of the Earth’s glaciers using satellite imagery from sensors such as the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and reflection Radiometer (ASTER) onboard NASA’s Terra satellite.

GLIMS was originally an ASTER Science Team project that is now approaching its 20th anniversary. The project is made up of a network of regional experts from over 60 institutions across the planet who analyze glaciers in their respective regions of expertise. The researchers produce glacier measurements such as digital glacier outlines, center flow lines, snow lines, surface velocity fields, hypsometry data, associated metadata, and literature references. The regional results are archived as a part of the GLIMS Glacier Database (GGDB) at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).(http://nsidc.org)

To read the full story,
https://lpdaac.usgs.gov/user_resources/data_in_action/global_land_ice_measurements_space_observing_glaciers

NASA LP DAAC is one of twelve Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) DAACs that manage, archive and distribute Earth science data as part of the Earth Science Data System Program. https://lpdaac.usgs.gov

For more information about NASA Earth science data, information, services and tools, https://earthdata.nasa.gov
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
Record Texas Flooding Left a “Horseshoe” in the Gulf of Mexico

In May 2015, more than 35 trillion gallons of water fell over Texas, enough to cover the entire state 8 inches deep in water. Of course, this severe flooding had an impact on land; 11 people died and property were lost. But this significant amount of water had to have an impact on the ocean too.

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite and other satellite instruments along with in situ data were used to create a comprehensive chronology of the flood from land to ocean. Besides SMAP Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) and soil moisture, the study used a wide array of other NASA observations: precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) missions, water storage observations from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, ocean color observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the Aqua satellite, and altimetric currents from the Jason satellite series.

Read the full story here, http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/OceanEvents/2016_12_06_SMAPHorseshoe_OceanStory
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
Announcing New Earthdata Developer Portal for Application Developers

The newly released Earthdata Developer Portal, at https://developer.earthdata.nasa.gov, is for application developers who wish to build applications that search, access, and browse NASA’s Earth science data by leveraging the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enterprise tools and services. The Earthdata Developer Portal provides centralized and uniform access to public Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and other documentation.

To learn more about what is available, https://earthdata.nasa.gov/earthdata-developer-portal#
1
Add a comment...

NASA Earthdata

Shared publicly  - 
 
Data Recipe of the Week: Quick 4-minute Guided Tour of the NASA Giovanni Application

Learn how to quickly visualize, analyze and manipulate a variety of NASA Earth science data products without having to download large amounts of data.


https://youtu.be/__Bc83VcWv0
1
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
NASA Earth Science Data, Services, Webinars, Tutorials and Tools
Introduction
Official Google+ Page for the NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)  data information, data products, services and tools.
http://earthdata.nasa.gov
Contact Information
Contact info
Email