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Nokia Bell Labs
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Changing the Way You See the World
Changing the Way You See the World

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On July 18, 1968, Robert Noyce, Andy Grove and Gordon Moore incorporated Intel. The microprocessor has allowed computers to increase in speed and decrease in size as forecasted by Gordon Moore with his Moore's Law, which dictates that every 18 months microprocessors double in speed and decrease in size by half.

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At Bell Labs, we call Claude Shannon, "A Goliath Amongst Giants." He is arguably the architect of the Information Age, whose insights, while working at Bell Labs, stand behind every computer built, email sent, video streamed, and webpage loaded. Now Claude Shannon’s full story is revealed in this elegantly written, exhaustively researched biography by Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman, titled, "A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age." Check out this interview with the authors with the IEEE and then we highly recommend reading the book.

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ICYMI, our own Marcus Weldon was recently named by Silicon Republic as one of the 12 need-to-know influencers driving new technology discussions. Marcus joins great company including Elon Musk, Sherry Turkle, Mady Delvaux-Stehres, Mike Schroepfer, Genevieve Bell, Linda Doyle, Marcus Weldon, Joy Buolamwini, Conor Walsh, Robin Chase, Andrew Ng and Resh Sidhu.

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On July 17, 1902, Willis Haviland Carrier, a young mechanical engineer completes schematic drawings for what will be the first air-conditioning system. Carrier, working for the Buffalo Forge heating company, was tasked to help a Brooklyn printing company that was having problems printing in variable humidity. His concept was to force air through a filter of a piston-driven compressor, where it was pumped over coils that were chilled using coolant. Cold air was then expelled into a closed space using a fan, cooling the room and stabilizing the humidity. He would go on to start an air-conditioning company that is still in business today as the Carrier Corporation. Photo of Carrier in 1922.

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Using a tablet to explore STEM and STEAM concepts is a natural pairing—as kids drag, draw and create they learn more about technology and the world around them. Here is a list from WeAreTeachers of 60 of the best STEAM apps, with recommendations for every grade level. WeAreTeachers is an online community for educators committed to one of the toughest, most rewarding jobs out there. Read on to get their list!

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On July 10, 1962, the Telstar 1 satellite was launched by Bell Labs, AT&T, NASA, British General Post Office and French National Post. It successfully relayed through space the first television pictures, telephone calls, telegraph images and live transatlantic television feed. The satellite was built by a team at Bell Labs that included John Robinson Pierce, who created the project; Rudy Kompfner, who invented the traveling-wave tube transponder; and James M. Early, who designed its transistors and solar panels. The aluminum satellite is 34.5 inches in diameter, weighs 170 pounds, used 14 watts of power generated by the 3,600 solar panels. It is still orbiting the Earth, 55 years later.

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In the future, every human will be connected to every other human on the planet by a wireless network. But that’s just the beginning. Soon the stuff of modern life will all be part of the network, and it will unlock infinite opportunities for new ways of talking, making and being. The network will be our sixth sense, connecting us to our digital lives. In this film, we ponder that existence and how it is enabled by inventions and technologies developed over the past 30 years, and the innovations that still lie ahead of us. From our Future Impossible Series. #ThisDayinSTEM

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Marcus Weldon spoke this week at Inspirefest in Dublin where he asked "What’s the greatest ever idea posed by creators of science-fiction? Is it aliens visiting Earth? Humans developing superpowers? Time travel?" He argued that saving time (or even creating time) is humanity’s sole goal. Fundamentally, Weldon said, using AI and IoT, innovation will again be about automating things, as with previous revolutions. “What we’re going to automate, though, is the mundane things, not the creative things. Machines are good at doing repetitive things, not creative things. That’s the one thing humans are good at. “Why do you automate? To create time. That is the only reason.” Watch his keynote here.

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On July 7, 1914, Robert Goddard, at age 31, was issued a U.S. patent, the first of the 214 patents he would obtain in his lifetime as a pioneer rocket scientist. This patent was for a “Rocket Apparatus” (U.S. No. 1,102,653) which described the multi-stage rocket concept. On March 16, 1926, his test launch, the first ever of a liquid-fueled rocket, managed to propel a 10-ft long projectile to a height of 41-ft (12.5 m). Its 2.5 second flight covered a distance of 184-ft at an average speed of 60-mph. The fuel was a combination of liquid oxygen and gasoline.

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Has Bell Labs created anything noteworthy recently? Harun Šiljak, former Research Collaborator at Bell Labs (2016-2017) answers that originally appeared on Quora: the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world. He says, "Exactly 70 years ago (in 1947), Bell Labs brought us transistor. Scratch that, actually. Exactly 70 years ago, Bell Labs brought us cellular telephony. It took a while for the technology to catch up, and Bell Labs wasn’t the one to win the race (Motorola did, and they made sure Bell Labs was the first to hear all about it), but that’s how it all started. Now, it’s Bell Labs again: they are making 5G happen.
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