Profile

Cover photo
Kent Damgaard
274 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosVideos

Stream

Kent Damgaard

Shared publicly  - 
 
A fun piece. I know that I'm several of these.

I'm definitely the life of the party. My team has always had a reputation for being talking and noisy yet delivering the goods.

And I'm probably also the sucker of ideas, because one of my passions is to have a system that is totally stable once deployed, so I tend to go more for the tried and tested than a new wild idea. I think that's a good way, if you're doing a system with many financial transactions or a system for an airport. But it might not get you the next Facebook :)
1
Add a comment...

Kent Damgaard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Was directed to this by Bruno Souzas Career Secrets site. It brings back a lot of memories from my early days.

Also makes me really appreciate my current testers :)
1
Add a comment...

Kent Damgaard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Looks like I should have been an expert several times already.

I'm not, and this has something to do with it.
Back in 1993, psychologists K. Anders Ericsson, Ralf Th. Krampe, and Clemens Tesch-Romer said that 10,000 hours of deliberate practice of a specific skill will make one an expert. Fast forward 15 years, and Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers made the 10,000 hours rule famous. And in 2012, Macklemore solidified it’s fact status: it officially takes 10,000 hours to be an exper …
1
Add a comment...

Kent Damgaard

Shared publicly  - 
 
A bit of heresy here, but I like heresy :)

I read the book she talked about, and liked it a lot, but I've also been thinking in later years that there are some problems with the idea of "the hacker".

People, often with stronger views on politics than on technology, praise "hackers" or activists when they act in a way that promotes their own agenda.

You'll see people cheering for those who attack one of the candidates in an election, those who expose the dirty laundry of politicians online and so on, while at the same time ranting and raving when corporations or the intelligence community use the technology for their ends.

To me, the problem is accountability and transparency. Anonymous or CIA should not have access to my personal data without being accountable to somebody. If I run a business, that business is mine, and I should have the choice to run it my way, in spite of what people walking in from the street might hold to be the "right" way to do it.

So, even though she does attack what one could call "deeply held beliefs", I think she has a point.

(you can skip the first 3:40 of the video to get the the actual talk).
I wouldn't be surprised to find out that many of us here today like to see our work as a continuation of say the Tech Model Railroad Club or the Homebrew Computer Club, and certainly the terminology and the values of this conference, like open source for example, have their roots in that era. As a consequence it's easy to interpret any criticism of the hacker ethic—which is what I'm about to do—as a kind of assault.
1
Add a comment...

Kent Damgaard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Fellow programmers, friends, nerds and geeks.

I'm off to celebrate with good friends for a few days. After that, I will return with a resolve to become better at what I do and doing ok with stuff I've never done before.

I wish you love and good food from those near you, and strength and courage from yourselves to go further.
1
Add a comment...
Kent's Collections