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Kai Günster
137 followers -
Binary Poet by day, boardgaming superhero at night.
Binary Poet by day, boardgaming superhero at night.

137 followers
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Z-Man Games are pushing their Pandemic games hard. We saw two new entirely new games from that line in Essen this year (Pandemic: The Cure and Pandemic: Contagion). Another new Pandemic game using the Legacy mechanic, making permanent changes to the game after each game has been announced. And now there will be a new expansion for the original Pandemic. State of Emergency by Matt Leacock (the original designer) and Tom Lehmann (designer of Race to the Galaxy and many more, also worked on Pandemic: On The Brink with Matt), will contain three very different expansion modules to make saving the world from diseases more challenging. The Hinterland Challenge has diseases crossing over from animals to humans - I have no idea what that could mean in terms of game mechanics. Emergency Events will mix up your game with random events - I'm guessing a miracle cure is not one of them. And the Superbug Challenge sounds downright nasty: a fifth disease is spreading, and there is no way to treat it. All you can do is produce a vaccine and try to stop the new disease from spreading, and to win you have to eradicate it completely. Breathing new life into Pandemic, that's a thought that makes me happy. 

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For the first time, Stonemaier Games will publish a game not designed by their own Jamey Stegmaier and Alan Stone in 2015. They said they would only do that if they really love a game, and I can see why they decided to publish Between Two Cities (Matthew O'Malley, Ben Rosset), because just reading about it I want to try it, the concept sounds great. Each player will build not one but two cities, but both are shared with one of his neighbours. Every round, each player selects two tiles to place in his cities, and then discusses with both neighbours which tile should go to which city, and where. That alone is an interesting communication aspect, but it gets better: the tiles you use are drafted 7 Wonders style, whatever you don't use goes to your neighbour, who you want to have a great tile to place in your shared city, but nothing good for his other city. And you can't go playing favorites, either, your final score is the score of your less valuable city. Of course we can't know until we try it, but this has potential to be great. 

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We already know some of the Rebel heroes of Star Wars: Imperial Assault. But what does the Empire field against them? The answer is almost obvious: Stormtroopers. Lots and lots of Stormtroopers. But unlike the ones in the movie, these guys can actually hit the broad side of a barn, and their squad training makes them even more dangerous when they come in packs. And to keep things interesting, Stormtroopers come in different flavors. For example, you get the E-Web Engineers with their heavy, tripod-mounted blasters. Due to their heavy weapon, they can't move and attack on the same turn, but when they attack they can attack twice, unlike every other Imperial unit. But Stormtroopers aren't everything, and the Empire has its own heroes: the Empire player can have Darth Vader himself on the field, complete with his signature move Force Choke. 

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Really, Google? If that's true then it's so classy I'll switch to Bing. Throwing a hissy fit like that may not violate your "don't be evil" doctrine, but it definitely goes against my "don't be a bloody moron" one.

Hey, great! Google Keep is live, so I can finally take notes online and then print them out to store them, because, you know, who knows how long that service will last? Does anyone know a good alternative for the old Google Docs, by the way? I want to keep some stuff "in the cloud" when they close that one, too.

Not that it will change anything, but just to let you know: losing Google Reader makes me extremely unhappy.

Some days, I really, really hate Unicode. Point in case: we just spent half an hour wondering why /\bbi\b/ matched ...bin... . The solution was that the n in bin is not really the latin lowercase letter n, it's a character from the arse of Unicode that only looks like an n but it not in RegExp \w - which automatically makes it a member of \b, and I don't mean the 4chan-board.

Now that the mystery is solved, the next step is to track down the people using that character in a file name and make them see the error of their ways. With some applied retro-phrenology.

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Quite fascinating
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