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Rob Donoghue
4,312 followers
4,312 followers
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Generous Play is Everyone’s Job
Generous Play is Everyone’s Job
walkingmind.evilhat.com
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Hanging around the lobby and Concord at Dreamation this morning.
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Super Delightful Thread
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My most recent novel, ULTRA, is now live on itch. It's a psychic road trip with aliens, government conspiracies, vegans, queer stuff, and a mysterious guy that looks like Jesse Ventura. You should definitely buy it.

https://machineage.itch.io/ultra
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Abuse From Caregivers

People with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to abuse from their caregivers. If you have a disability and are being supported by someone, know that you do not owe them your bodily autonomy, and that their care does not mean that they have the right to abuse you in any way. There is help out there for you.

This can be incredibly complicated and painful, as love, care, and vulnerability all tangle up together and because societal support for disabled people is so low that it is very easy to become isolated, to feel that this is the only person in the entire world who will take care of you. Relationships that existed before acquired or growing disabilities are very often stretched and challenged after the onset. It does not help that our society tends to cast caregivers as saints and disabled people as unworthy; that can cover up a host of abuses. Disabled people are not unworthy. Disabled people have the same basic human rights as able-bodied people.

If you are the friend to someone with a disability, just try to be aware of these dynamics and be a part of your friend's extended support network, so that they are less vulnerable. Try to be there for your friend, and modify how you spend time with them if needed to accommodate their disability (perhaps it is easier for them to spend time with you online, or perhaps they need wheelchair access, or a quieter environment, or several days rest between social activity; if you don't know, then ask them what will help them.) Isolation nurtures abuse if there is a a potential for it; even the simplest acts of friendship will build a bridge out of that isolation.
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