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Jonathan Elliott (AdamHaze)
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If you're squeamish, don't kick the beach rubble. - Jonathan Littell
If you're squeamish, don't kick the beach rubble. - Jonathan Littell

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Question for you all, I'm working on a UR for a wrong turn, and found this intersection that uses a roundabout instead of just a standard intersection.  Is there a reason to use a roundabout at standard intersections?  https://www.waze.com/editor/?lon=-111.89552&lat=33.62749&zoom=7&layers=901&env=usa&segments=78542290

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Is there someone around who could unlock (or edit) the off ramps (north and south) to exit 222 here - https://www.waze.com/editor/?lon=-112.13096&lat=33.7701&zoom=4&layers=901&segments=77400962&env=usa  It should be Dove Valley Rd instead of Sonoran Blvd.  It looks like the end of the southbound off ramp also needs to have the straight directional arrow changed to green.

I'm looking at at UR at 92nd St and E Ironwood Square Dr.  It looks like the Northern road segment there has a green turn where there shouldn't be, due to a median.  Could someone level 2+ take a look?

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It has been my mission for some time to make cell phone photography into a valid art medium.  Anyone can take a picture with their cell phone, just as anyone can take a picture with a camera.  A fewer number of people can then take those cell phone pictures and "edit" them in one of the many photo-manipulation programs to make them something really special, just as a fewer number of people can take pictures with a camera that fall into the same category.

I'm doing something else.

When a traditional photographer takes a negative into the darkroom, there is a limit to what can be done in the developmental process.  Sure there are a plethora of of tricks that can produce final images to look as slick as anything coming out of a digital studio, but these are most often not employed by the "classic" photographer.  These developers limit themselves to just contrast, some burning and dodging, and many, many prints until just the right effect is achieved.

In order to produce a more pure form of digital photography, I've limited myself to a few rules, to keep it as "pure" as possible.  These rules are:

1. Absolutely, positively, no digital manipulation of the photo components. No dust or trash removal.  No editing of lens glare.  No changing anything within the image itself. And no cropping. This is the rule I never break if I even want to call something a "cell phone" photo.  It makes it too easy.  Without this limitation, you could make every photo you take be perfect, and that defeats the whole purpose.

2. The color mode you shoot is the color you get. No converting from color to b/w, b/w to sepia, etc.  This represents the real challenge of deciding which film to use, b/w or color.  In the real world, it is possible to turn color into b/w, but not always with a good effect, so I'm basically saying it doesn't apply here.

3. Light level and contrast are determined by the phone. No after the fact changing of the contrast or brightness of a photo.  Though many phone cameras are "auto" light adjusting, some let you make minor adjustments, which in turn affects the contrast.  Changing this after the fact lessens the "art" and skill of the photo taking process, especially since you can already see what you're going to get.  Yes, sometimes there is too much glare on the screen, or the screen is too small to view the detail appropriately, and so sometimes this rule needs to be bent or broken.  That's why I have it listed last.  I almost always adhere to it anyway, but have in fact dis-obeyed it once or twice.

So why a cell phone?  Why not adhere to these rules with all digital photography?  Basically, because of the format.  Same reason some people shoot with a Lomo (done that), or a Holga (done that too).  Basically these are point and shoot cameras that don't quite come out perfect, and that's what makes the pictures taken with them so magical.  It's the same thing with the cell phone.  The size and lack of precision when taking pictures make framing a much more difficult task, and so the taken image needs to be preserved intact to make the rewards all the more worthwhile.

These galleries are exactly like what they sound.  All of these images were taken with my cell phones, a Sony Ericsson T616, and the LG V.  The Sony is a quirky little thing, and it's light tolerance is very slight, but this provides for some wonderful shots when I otherwise wouldn't have been able to capture them.  One of my only regrets is that the quality is so low, since some of them I really like.  The LG is a bit better.  Batter light control, much better picture quality, and a so-called "macro" feature that only works if the lens is within a 2cm margin of the focal range.

Almost all of these photos are ordered chronologically (as you can tell by the increasing quality of the images), and I was still wrapping my head around the concept during the early ones.  If you don't dig the first few, skip ahead, and I'm pretty sure you'll like the later stuff better.
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Phone Photography
155 Photos - View album
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Years ago, when a friend of mine was getting married, I counted down the days to the wedding by posting a different picture of flowers each day, with the final picture being the wedding day itself.
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2014-02-02
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Miscellaneous Digital Artwork
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In a motion picture, an establishing shot can set a location, mood, or even give us a glimpse of what is to come.  I wanted to capture that same essence, without the rest of the movie to accompany it.  In these images, I have tried to establish scenes that are eerie, bizarre, or just unusual.  Most of all, I wanted to capture a sense of story, without showing anything more than a setting.  I want the viewer to wonder what will happen, or why they are looking at a particular image.

These locations are nothing special.  Most of us pass places like these every day and never look twice.  Hopefully, by seeing them in a dedicated context, and in a different light, people will feel the same sense of mystery that I do when viewing them.
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Establishing Shots
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2014-02-02
6 Photos - View album
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