Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Aluminium Trade Centre
19 followers
19 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
This top-heavy house in Madrid by Fran Silvestre Arquitectos features a roof terrace that spans the entire width of the building and extends out towards a swimming pool.
The Valencia-based firm wanted the two-storey-high Aluminium House to appear smaller than it actually is. To achieve this, they tried to make the top level feel like the main storey, and the lower level an extension of the patio.
To emphasise the effect, the top-heavy first floor is clad in aluminium panels, while the ground floor is covered in a light stone like the surrounding paving.
The large roof terrace cantilevers out from the first floor towards the pool, creating a shaded area beneath.
"The piece, of metallic and horizontal nature, produces the effect of having just one storey," said Fran Silvestre Arquitectos.
"The scale of the house is moderated through the understanding of the day area as a base emerging from the same natural stone which paves part of the plot," added the studio.
Both floors feature walls of glazing facing out over the swimming pool. The roof terrace also features a frameless glass balustrade, so as not to interrupt the view.
Smaller windows puncture the other three facades, offering framed glimpses of the surrounding garden and trees.
The interior is kept bright and minimal. White marble provides flooring throughout the building, and is complemented by bright white walls and monochrome furnishings.
To bring in plenty of light, the architects designed a top-lit atrium that contains the staircase. It connects the two main floors with a basement level below.
The staircase and central inner atrium distribute the rooms, establishing a functional hierarchy in which all spaces open up to the garden," said the firm.
An open-plan space on the ground floor accommodates the living room, kitchen and dining area. Above this, three en-suite bedrooms lead onto the terrace.
There is also larger master bedroom that extends the full width of the
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
04/08/2017
6 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Check out these aluminium wire artworks by Brooklyn-based Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park. Each figure in this series entitled Human, is remarkably life like, down to the finest detail of the human body (including wispy locks of hair) and includes the natural draping of garments.
Park’s sculptures capture the equally realistic wrinkles of scrunched up fabric and curves on each body. He is also as meticulous about representing a believable figure in a plausible position as he is about the placement of each wire strand. Look closely and you can see just how tight and uniform the wires composition is, reflecting the time-consuming effort put into each piece. Like the rings of a tree, the aluminium wire designs offer a visual sense of time and texture. See more at www.seungmopark.com
PhotoPhotoPhoto
07/04/2017
3 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Check out this house made with 22,000 flattened aluminium cans.
Aluminium cans are one of the most readily recycled items that we throw away, but this idea had nothing to do with art or the environment, as Richard Van Os Keuls, an architect from Silver Spring Maryland was simply looking for a cheap and durable alternative to conventional materials.
Preparation was simple: first each can was stomped, then flattened further with a sledgehammer, then the corners rounded for safety. When ready, Richard simply placed 30-40 cans overlapping each other and secured them with a long aluminium nail. The original intention was to paint over the cans, but as the wall started to take place, the bright mosaic looked better and better so cheap colourful beer and soda cans from around the world were ordered to incorporate as many different colours as possible.
Richard says the walls are not noisy when it rains, and while aluminium tends to develop a chalky oxidation, the ink on the cans has significantly slowed up the process, so his can-covered home continues to be a colourful inspiration to architects and designers around the world.

Photo
Photo
18/01/2017
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Fancy driving the all aluminium Mercedes AMG Vision Gran Turismo?
With magical specifications and a 'virtual aluminium space frame body', Mercedes say the car is 'unrivalled in the supercar segment'. Which all sounds great except for just one minor issue: the car only exists in the virtual world of PlayStation Gran Turismo 6.
Nevertheless, it looks terrific – maybe we’ll see it on the streets some day?!
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Seven cool things you never knew about aluminium!
1 The Washington Monument was decorated in 1884 with an aluminium cap because it was considered one of the most precious metals at the time.
2 Recycling one aluminium can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning for four hours.
3 Producing aluminium from scrap uses only 5% of the energy than producing it from new does.
4 At only 150 years old aluminium is one of the youngest commercial metals (compared with copper that humans have used for 9,000 years!)
5 Aluminium was classified as a precious metal during the mid 19th century. Napoleon III gave aluminium cutlery to his most distinguished guests; all the others had to eat with gold cutlery.
6 Two different alloys are used for the body and lid of an aluminium can.
7 The aluminium share in cars is expected to double from 8% to 16% by 2025
Photo
Photo
2016-07-12
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Check out this beautiful children’s playground made from 990 pleated aluminium shingles.
Designed by Marc Fornes of new York design studio Theverymany, each piece of aluminium was digitally prefabricated to ensure maximum strength across the whole form. Overlapping pleats create a continuous configuration, adding rigidity to the structure.
Entitled “Pleated Inflation”, the structure is part art installation and part childnren’s playground shelter built on a school ground in Argeles-Sur-Mer, France under the “1% Artistique” program which ensures one percent of the budget for any public building is allocated to some form or artwork. In addition to being an energetic and eye-catching sculpture, the amphitheatre doubles as a functional space for school children. On a sunny day, students are splashed by a shower of twisted light rays and ornate shadows cast by the perforated pleats. A layer of vibrant colours add a playful boldness, inviting students to approach and explore the construct.
theverymany.com
PhotoPhotoPhoto
2016-02-21
3 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Anyone for cheese?
Have a look at this sculpture by US artist Bruce Gray entitled “The Big Cheese #4”. Inspired by the work of Claes Oldenburg the piece is made from welded aluminium uses intersecting bubbles of various diameters and can be yours for a mere $15,000. This work has actually appeared in a quite a few TV shows including HBO’s “Six Feet Under” – see the still.
Photo
Photo
2015-11-08
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Monash Motor Sports unveils their latest car.
ATC sponsors the racing cars that the Monash University engineering students build each year as part of their curriculum. They’ve been highly successful in the world championships – and here is their latest car. Looks like a lot of fun to me!
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2015-09-20
5 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Pouring molten aluminium in a watermelon!
 -watch as the “Backyard Scientist” makes a sculpture with my favourite metal.
 I don’t know much about this guy except that he is based in Florida somewhere and is pretty brave – I would not want to be anywhere near that watermelon when the metal goes in!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Check out the incredible “Aluminium Centrum” in Holland.
Architect Micha de Haas was inspired by the landscape around the Dutch town of Houten. Named “Aluminium Forest” and held aloft by hundreds of slender aluminium columns this design was the winner out of 64 entries from an international competition intended to highlight the possibilities of building with aluminium.
The supports range from 60mm - 210mm in diameter and are intended to give the impression that the one storey building is sitting on top of “trees”. The construction is unusual because in order to create the visual effect, no cross bracing of the supports could be allowed. The floor, walls and roof are all made from aluminium beams, plates and sheets.
If they ever decide to vacate, I’d be happy to move ATC into this place!
PhotoPhotoPhoto
2015-08-07
3 Photos - View album
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded