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Tarkus

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What is "Bohemian Rhapsody" about? Short answer: nobody has a clue.

On the one hand, it's the tale of a man who confesses murder to his mother and ends up on trial, but on another it's a nonsensical melange of Florentine astronomers, Rossini characters and Scaramouches.

Some think it references Freddie Mercury's sexuality; others insist it's about spiritual redemption. Wayne and Garth think it's just good for a head bang.

As one of rock music's most histrionic and memorable tracks hits its 40th birthday (the original was released during a relatively dull period between glam and punk on Oct. 31, 1975), here are 16 things we definitely do know about Queen's masterpiece.
Created in six studios using 180 overdubs, "Bohemian Rhapsody" is a monster feat of technical achievement.
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But scattered among the more than six dozen cuts included on the bonus discs are a handful of gems. And the best of them are leftover songs that would have fit snugly on the albums they were originally recorded for. Many of the 10 Songs You Need to Hear From the Led Zeppelin Reissues come from the two extra discs included with Coda, the 1982 odds-and-ends LP that was released after the band broke up.
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Asked if he could play with Sabbath again, Ward tells 106.5 WSFL: "If everybody could get on the same page – my page. I've been quite pronounced about my page, which is a signable contract and an apology over certain issues that Ozzy said about me that weren't true.

"He said these things at the public level, so I'd like him to publicly apologise. He's already responded to that, saying that'll never happen. So, as long as that'll never happen, then I probably won't be joining the band in 2016."
Drummer gutted by impasse – but insists he still needs apology and a fair contract to consider a comeback
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“That’s the beauty of Yes,” Sherwood says. “It doesn’t relent in that regard. A lot of the heavier conversations I was having with Chris toward the end were about his desire for this thing to go forward. He kept reiterating that to me and I kept telling him, ‘Yeah, I understand that but were going forward with you in it. I’ll produce it. But you’re going to be the guy playing on it. He kept telling me, ‘No matter what happens, Yes needs to continue moving forward and make great music. So promise me that that’s something you want to do.’ And I have to keep making music. It’s just what I do. And,” he adds, “I’m a fan of the band and I want to see it thrive and that means new music.”
On the eve of a US tour with Toto, Yes bassist Billy Sherwood talks about the band's past, future, and the phone calls that forever changed his life.
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Asked about releasing the recordings, Page tells Radio.com: “Absolutely, but I haven’t worked on it. It’s something I wanted to do after all the Led Zeppelin stuff was out.

“I wanted to contact Chris and Alan. The music was really good – it’s the first thing I did after we lost John Bonham.

“I had a studio at the time and they wanted to get together. I thought it was like laying down the gauntlet: ‘I’m not curling up under a rock and hiding.’

“These guys are really, really good, so I had to be really good too. It was really an interesting blend – really good music.”
Jimmy Page hopes to publish abandonded supergroup’s work in aftermath of Yes man’s death
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26th June 1971 : "Tarkus" #1

 Emerson Lake and Palmer went to No.1 on the UK chart with their second album 'Tarkus'.

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Have them in circles
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Tarkus

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Ex Yes & Zeppelin (XYZ) Demo - 1981
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Jimmy Page has a lot of ideas about what he’d like to do next, now that the final three Led Zeppelin reissues have been released. Page recently discussed those plans, and talked more about his return to Presence, In Through the Out Door and Coda, with Paul Shaffer.

Shaffer, of course, just wrapped up more than three decades as the bandleader and sidekick for The Late Show with David Letterman. He continues to host Paul Shaffer’s Day in Rock, a syndicated daily rock history radio feature – and there was, of course, plenty of history to discuss with Jimmy Page.
Jimmy Page discussed the final three Led Zeppelin reissues, his history as a sessions guitarist and future plans in a 2015 interview.
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When a band loses its last original member, it’s typically the signal for the remaining members to call it quits. In the case of Yes, which began in 1968, the musical legacy outshines the sums of its parts. Yes is a band that was always destined to continue after Phoenix resident and founding bassist Chris Squire died from leukemia in June. Squire’s desire that Yes “keep it moving on,” was made easier by the fact that guitarist Steve Howe has mostly been with the band since 1970, and drummer Alan White has been a constant force since 1972.

“It will never be the same, but we’re trying to move on because Chris wanted us to move it on,” White says.
Drummer Alan White of Yes talks about being in one of the most important prog-rock bands ever.
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Not even close to how I would rank them, but you know what they say about opinions.....
The biggest, loudest, heaviest band of all.
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Originally released in July 1977, just as punk rock was reaching its critical and commercial apex (and just as prog itself was starting to vanish into the “dinosaur” dust bins), Going for the One wasn’t a likely candidate for a hit album, and the departure of keyboard virtuoso Patrick Moraz (who added his jazz-fusion touch to Yes’ prior album, Relayer) only made prospects even bleaker.

But the return of keyboard whiz Rick Wakeman in 1976 signaled a creative re-invigoration, helping Yes re-emerge with one of their finest albums in their rich catalog and one of prog’s most overlooked treasures.
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But lets face it, both Yes and Rush could have gotten rid of the dudes with the naked butt cheeks on their album covers. It didn't stop Pink Floyd setting their dude on fire, lol.
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Alternative, Classic, Metal and Progressive Rock
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Discussion, links and videos for many types of music, but mostly alternative, classic, metal and progressive rock.  Participation and suggestions are encouraged!