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On This Day: In 1642 Abel Tasman spotted the present-day island of Tasmania, calling it Van Diemen’s Land. He landed at today’s Blackman Bay and claimed it for the Dutch. Between 1772 and 1798 only the southeastern portion of the island was visited. Tasmania was not known to be an island until Matthew Flinders and George Bass circumnavigated it in the Norfolk in 1798-99. In 1803, the island was colonized by the British as a penal colony with the name Van Diemen's Land, and became part of the British colony of New South Wales. The indigenous people of Tasmania initially welcomed and tried to live in harmony with the new people coming to their island. However, when the British colonized the island for a penal colony, they also introduced disease, which quickly spread through the indigenous population. At the same time, the British colonists started the Black War, which is considered to be one of the earliest recorded modern genocides. Within 30 years of British colonization, almost the entire indigenous population had been killed. On 1 December 1826, the Tasmanian Colonial Times declared that: “We make no pompous display of Philanthropy. We say this unequivocally SELF DEFENCE IS THE FIRST LAW OF NATURE. THE GOVERNMENT MUST REMOVE THE NATIVES – IF NOT, THEY WILL BE HUNTED DOWN LIKE WILD BEASTS, AND DESTROYED!” Despite these horrendous actions, the indigenous people of Tasmania survived and continue to demand their rights to land and self-determination.
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Gaston Hidalgo-Campusano's profile photoAudrey Thayer's profile photo
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One of the biggest tragedies for the Nenets nation happened on 21th June 1943 in the Polar Ural Mountains. Officially Mandalada is known as the struggle of this little tundra nation against new Sov...
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On This Day: In 1874 Colonel R.S. Mackenzie led Army troops to the Palo Duro Canyon in Texas where he encountered five camps of Southern Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Comanche people peacefully camped. Mackenzie immediately attacked and destroyed over 100 lodges, as well as capturing over 1,400 horses. Without their traditional means of travel, many Southern Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Comanche suffered during the following winter as they were no longer able to hunt without their horses; Mackenzie did not need the horses, so most were slaughtered and left to rot. In this photo Don Parker, the great-grandson of Quanah Parker, conducts a cedar-burning ceremony at the 137th anniversary of the Battle of Palo Duro Canyon at the Pioneer Amphitheater.
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Michael Schobel's profile photoDawn Hardin's profile photo
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On This Day: In 1868 the Battle of Washita River (also called Battle of the Washita or the Washita Massacre) took place when Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer’s 7th U.S. Cavalry attacked Black Kettle’s Southern Cheyenne camp on the Washita River (near present day Cheyenne, Oklahoma), part of a major winter encampment of numerous bands. Black Kettle (Moke-tav-a-to) and his wife, Medicine Woman Later, were shot in the back and killed while fleeing on a pony, and over 100 warriors were killed. Custer and his men also killed over 675 horses. The attack was part of General Philip Sheridan’s strategy to attack Cheyenne winter encampments and to destroy supplies and livestock, with the idea of forcing the Cheyenne onto reservations.
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Dawn Hardin's profile photoMichael Schobel's profile photoStefani Banerian's profile photoHaver Jim's profile photo
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On This Day: In 1872 Chief Ten Bears - born Paruasemana - passed away. He was involved in several actions and treaties, demanding the rights and protection of Comanche lands, including the Treaty of Fort Atkinson, the Treaty of the Little Arkansas River, and the Medicine Lodge Treaty. He also visited Washington D.C. to try and secure rights and land for his people. In a speech at the Medicine Lodge Treaty, Chief Ten Bears said,

"My heart is filled with joy when I see you here, as the brooks fill with water when the snow melts in the spring; and I feel glad, as the ponies do when the fresh grass starts in the beginning of the year. I heard of your coming when I was many sleeps away, and I made but a few camps when I met you. I know that you had come to do good to me and my people. I looked for benefits which would last forever, and so my face shines with joy as I look upon you. My people have never first drawn a bow or fired a gun against the whites. There has been trouble on the line between us and my young men have danced the war dance. But it was not begun by us. It was you to send the first soldier and we who sent out the second. Two years ago I came upon this road, following the buffalo, that my wives and children might have their cheeks plump and their bodies warm. But the soldiers fired on us, and since that time there has been a noise like that of a thunderstorm and we have not known which way to go. So it was upon the Canadian. Nor have we been made to cry alone. The blue dressed soldiers and the Utes came from out of the night when it was dark and still, and for camp fires they lit our lodges. Instead of hunting game they killed my braves, and the warriors of the tribe cut short their hair for the dead. So it was in Texas. They made sorrow come in our camps, and we went out like the buffalo bulls when the cows are attacked. When we found them, we killed them, and their scalps hang in our lodges. The Comanches are not weak and blind, like the pups of a dog when seven sleeps old. They are strong and farsighted, like grown horses. We took their road and we went on it. The white women cried and our women laughed.
But there are things which you have said which I do not like. They were not sweet like sugar but bitter like gourds. You said that you wanted to put us upon reservation, to build our houses and make us medicine lodges. I do not want them. I was born on the prairie where the wind blew free and there was nothing to break the light of the sun. I was born where there were no inclosures [sic] and where everything drew a free breath. I want to die there and not within walls. I know every stream and every wood between the Rio Grande and the Arkansas. I have hunted and lived over the country. I lived like my fathers before me, and like them, I lived happily.

When I was at Washington the Great Father told me that all the Comanche land was ours and that no one should hinder us in living upon it. So, why do you ask us to leave the rivers and the sun and the wind and live in houses? Do not ask us to give up the buffalo for the sheep. The young men have heard talk of this, and it has made them sad and angry. Do not speak of it more. I love to carry out the talk I got from the Great Father. When I get goods and presents I and my people feel glad, since it shows that he holds us in his eye.

If the Texans had kept out of my country there might have been peace. But that which you now say we must live on is too small. The Texans have taken away the places where the grass grew the thickest and the timber was the best. Had we kept that we might have done the things you ask. But it is too late. The white man has the country which we loved, and we only wish to wander on the prairie until we die. Any good thing you say to me shall not be forgotten. I shall carry it as near to my heart as my children, and it shall be as often on my tongue as the name of the Great Father. I want no blood upon my land to stain the grass. I want it all clear and pure and I wish it so that all who go through among my people may find peace when they come in and leave it when they go out."
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Indigenous Fellow Imelde Sabushimike calls for protection of the Batwa community and their  identity rights as #indigenous peoples in #Burundi.

The #Batwa community has historically lived as hunters and gatherers in the equatorial forests of Africa and two decades ago, they lost their native land without integration or compensation to live outside the forests. 

The drastic lifestyle changes have left the Batwa in a “dungeon of despair”, says Imelde. She believes they should have given them the mechanisms to integrate and survive, but instead they have been “marginalized, oppressed, discriminated against and left to themselves.” More: http://sm.ohchr.org/18oY8Fo
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On This Day: In 1879 Apache Chief Victorio and warriors defeated Captain Byron Dawson and the Ninth Cavalry at the Battle of Las Animas Canyon, New Mexico. Victorio and the Apache were peacefully encamped at the canyon when two companies of cavalry under Captain Byron Dawson discovered them. Victorio's forces, numbering at least sixty men, positioned themselves atop of a ridge overlooking Las Animas Canyon and the adjoining Massacre Canyon. When the Americans were inside the canyon the Apaches opened fire with their rifles and bows, forcing the soldiers to take cover behind boulders and other natural defenses. Two other companies from the 9th cavalry were in the area and proceeded to the battlefield. When the reinforcements entered the canyon, Victorio's warriors ceased firing until the Americans began a flanking maneuver towards the ridge. Victorio's men then opened fire again and repulsed the attack. Official military reports of the event vary, but list either five or six troopers killed, two or three Navajo scouts killed, one civilian killed, and 32 horses killed in the battle. No Apache were believed killed. Three soldiers, Lieutenant Robert Temple Emmet, Lieutenant Mathias Day and Sergeant John Denny received the Congressional Medal of Honor for "acts of bravery" during the battle.
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In their circles
488 people
Have them in circles
620 people
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Luis Lopez (Luisangelo)'s profile photo
International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples, 9 August's profile photo
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