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CenterForLit
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Are you interested in enrolling your student in our Online Academy, but still unsure about the CenterForLit model? Do you wish you could find out what our classroom is like without paying tuition first? Now's your chance! On July 21 and 26 we will be hosting our annual free summer sessions--it's like a CenterForLit Open House! Just be sure to claim your spot now as these seats tend to go fast!
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Did Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter leave a bad taste in your mouth? Many people reject the novel for being too moralistic, while others fear that it promotes individualism and and a twisted view of church community. Well this week on The Hovel, Ian Andrews gives us a reason to reconsider our opinion of The Scarlet Letter and suggests that it might just be the most beautiful portrait of true grace that he has read this year.
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In a previous episode of BiblioFiles, the Andrews questioned whether or not it is necessary for good art to be beautiful. Well, we didn't want to make the other transcendentals feel left out! So in our most recent podcast we decided to have the same discussion about truth. Is it necessary that literature tell the truth? Help us decide! Episode 8 of BiblioFiles is now available on iTunes and on the website.
http://www.centerforlit.com/podcasts/
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You're cold. You're tired. You're stressed. You're behind. And now you just took it out on the kids. Feeling guilty? Adam Andrews offers some relief and perspective in his latest post on The Hovel.
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You're stranded on a desert island, and you can only bring three books. Which books do you bring? No anthologies or complete works allowed!
Missy tackles this impossible, classic question in her latest post on The Hovel. 
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Our second episode of BiblioFiles is now available! This time the Andrews introduce the concept of The Great Conversation--an idea at the very heart of our company's philosophy--and discuss which works offer contributions to the dialogue.

(By the way, you can stay up to date with the latest BilblioFiles episodes by subscribing to our podcast in iTunes!!)
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Two weeks ago on The Hovel, Adam Andrews explained why forcing "Christian themes" out of books written from an atheistic perspective is harmful. This week, in part two of "Christian Books and Christian Reading," he discusses why Christians would even want to read such books–or worse–teach them to their students.
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Say you have two high-schoolers, one student in junior high, and another in elementary. The high-schoolers each have 10 books that you absolutely must teach them this year so that they can be prepared to get into college. The junior-higher has another 8, and somehow you still need to read aloud to the little.  Sure, maybe you could do this if you spent every waking hour reading books...but somehow meals still need to get made and the laundry needs to be folded! Oh yeah, and I guess we have to make time for science and math at some point. It's enough to make you pull out your hair! How on earth are you supposed to survive?? Do we just need to give up dreams of college?

Enter the lie. It's called "The Tyranny of the Booklist." And it's what we'll be chatting about in our next Office Hours session with the Pelican Society on February 25 at 1:00 p.m. Pacific Time. So grab a cup of coffee and bring those booklists. We're going to have a list-burning. 
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A money-making scheme goes sour fast when two kidnappers realize they're ransoming a spoiled brat that no one wants back...Our newest addition to the Radio Read Along collection is now available on the website! Adam Andrews reads O. Henry's classic short story, "The Ransom of Red Chief." 
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Ian Andrews makes his first appearance on The Hovel with reflections on the role of fantasy literature and Tolkien's treatment of death. 
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