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Michael McGreevy
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Michael McGreevy

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on the plan to sequence all icelanders, to find patterns of disease.
In the ninth century there was a Norwegian Viking named Kveldulf, so big and strong that no man could defeat him. He sailed the seas…
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Michael McGreevy

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"I want to have a direct relationship with the non-government sector," Mr Pyne said. "Having talked to the Prime Minister about this matter many times, it is his view that we have a particular responsibility for non-government schooling that we don't have for government schooling."

I think my head just exploded.

The quote is from a speech last year, included in the linked article.
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rorting? +Ben McGreevy 
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Priceless opening paragraph.

Tony Abbott has read the riot act to his colleagues, warning there would be personal consequences for anyone caught leaking, according to leaks from Tuesday's party room meeting.
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 Mr Abbott said his warning that there would be "political and personal consequences" for anyone caught breaching cabinet processes, proved to be a "come to Jesus moment" for his ministers.

So he now thinks he's Jesus?
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"... just as Microsoft Word's grammar checker underlines every passive in wavy green to signal that you should try to get rid of it. That overinterpretation is part of the damage that Strunk and White have unintentionally done."
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He's certainly not sitting on the fence
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Finally...
It’s happening: Netflix has ordered a 13-episode season of Fuller House. John Stamos will produce the Full House sequel and guest star in his reprised role of Uncle Jesse. Candace Cameron-Bure,...
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Do you have Netflix btw?
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this is the synthetic diamonds of spirits: Our trick was to develop a system that breaks the wood polymers apart in the same proportion as classical aging. Then force the esterification
A distiller has come up with a method of producing spirits that taste like they've been aging in the barrel for 20 years, but his process only takes six days.
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I wonder which liberties the Liberal party still believes in.

The new citizenship law, by seeking to add an extremely long list of ways in which we can "renounce" our citizenship, is designed to make them a substantive part of our personal duty to the State. This is a very different thing from just calling them a crime. Losing your liberty is a very different thing from losing your identity as an Australian.
By inserting the requirement for allegiance to Australia into the proposed citizenship laws, the Government is invoking an idea that hasn't really existed since medieval times.
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Probably the liberty of the king leaders.
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The return of centrally planned economies: Big data beats Hayek. Real estate investment trust moved from a decentralized system of landlord/property managers to set their rents to a centralized system using huge datasets and price setting software, revenue management software is also widely used by airlines and hotels, software is being used in hiring decisions, and Uber uses an algorithm to set prices rather than letting drivers set them.

Hayek's essay "The Use of Knowledge in Society" makes the case for the use of decentralized markets to take advantage of widely dispersed information to make choices. "Central planning based on statistical information by its nature cannot take direct account of these circumstances of time and place and that the central planner will have to find some way or other in which the decisions depending on them can be left to the 'man on the spot.'" It was probably true when he wrote that in 1945, but it's wrong now. Now centralized algorithms  outperform decentralized local manager knowledge.
A few years ago I was speaking with an executive from a real estate investment trust that does billions of dollars a year in revenue. He was telling me about how they moved from a decentralized system of landlord/property managers to set their rents to one that utilized huge datasets [...]
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I was a member of the SDA when I worked in retail in high school. I was signed up, like this article describes, as a standard part of the onboarding process. When every new employee is signed up like this, the SDA ends up with huge membership numbers and consequently huge power to influence ALP policy.


At the time I knew that the unions formed a large part of Labor's support, and that this strongly influenced Labor's industrial policies. I also knew that there was a strong historical Catholic influence in the ALP. I had no idea, however, how much the SDA was meddling in social issues outside of industrial relations. De Bruyn's claim that his members agree "absolutely" with his stance against marriage equality is glib bullshit. They have no idea what he's up to and he knows it.

The SDA has no place dictating social policy. If I were still a member of the SDA today I would cancel my membership immediately. It would be delicious irony to see large numbers of current SDA members do likewise -- go on strike from the union, as it were.
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Cool...
 
We used to think that once a cell reaches full maturation, its DNA is totally stable, including the molecular tags attached to it to control its genes and maintain the cell’s identity. Some cells actually alter their DNA all the time, just to perform everyday functions
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An interesting and subtle article.
 
Extinction is Not the Problem

My preferred title and subtitle for this piece I wrote that appeared on Aeon Magazine today is “Extinction is Not the Problem: Spreading panic about extinction is the wrong narrative for conservation--wrong on the facts and wrong in its effect.”

The piece begins:

The way the public hears about conservation issues is nearly always in the mode of [‘BELOVED ANIMAL] THREATENED WITH EXTINCTION’. That makes for electrifying headlines, but it misdirects concern. The loss of whole species is not the leading problem in conservation. The leading problem is the decline in wild animal populations, sometimes to a radical degree, often diminishing the health of whole ecosystems.

Viewing every conservation issue through the lens of extinction threat is simplistic and usually irrelevant. Worse, it introduces an emotional charge that makes the problem seem cosmic and overwhelming rather than local and solvable. It’s as if the entire field of human medicine were treated solely as a matter of death prevention. Every session with a doctor would begin: ‘Well, you’re dying. Let’s see if we can do anything to slow that down a little.’

Medicine is about health. So is conservation. And as with medicine, the trends for conservation in this century are looking bright. We are re-enriching some ecosystems we once depleted and slowing the depletion of others. Before I explain how we are doing that, let me spell out how exaggerated the focus on extinction has become and how it distorts the public perception of conservation...

[The rest is at the link.  Comments welcome}
The idea that we are edging up to a mass extinction is not just wrong – it’s a recipe for panic and paralysis
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Interesting article.
Americans are fielding millions of calls from bright, energetic telemarketers, but what they don't know is that they're talking to machines... Sort of. 
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