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European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
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Europe's flagship laboratory for the life sciences.
Europe's flagship laboratory for the life sciences.

557 followers
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Summer in Science 2018 - For two weeks, 16 students from around Italy have taken part in the second edition of ‘Summer in Science’, a summer school organised by Adamas Scienza – a non-profit organisation dedicated to promoting scientific culture and innovative methodologies in life science education. Summer in Science is a two-week experience designed to help highly motivated high-school students to get a taste of working in a lab and to better understand how science works. Rossana De Loren...
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Welcome: Vikas Trivedi - Vikas Trivedi will join EMBL in October as a group leader in Barcelona. His group will combine engineering and biology to understand how groups of cells, such as developing embryos, self-organise. You studied engineering, how did you transition to biology? My undergraduate course was interesting because we applied engineering approaches to biological subjects, so I’m trained to understand biological systems using basic principles. When I went to Caltech for my PhD I...
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Humans of EMBL: Outreach - Chiara Morelli. PHOTO: Berta Carreño/EMBL Chiara Morelli Predoctoral Fellow, EMBL Rome Doing outreach is part of my DNA. My grandma was a science teacher and she gave me my first microscope when I was six! We would do experiments together and we really enjoyed it. In a way, she was doing outreach with me, and it worked: I’ve always wanted to become a researcher! Now, I do my best to challenge people’s preconceptions about science and scientists. Last year I was a ...
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Understanding soil through its microbiome - Soil is full of life, essential for nutrient cycling and carbon storage. To better understand how it functions, an international research team led by EMBL and the University of Tartu (Estonia) conducted the first global study of bacteria and fungi in soil. Their results show that bacteria and fungi are in constant competition for nutrients and produce an arsenal of antibiotics to gain an advantage over one another. The study can also help predict ...
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The proteins behind hungry cells - EMBL scientists have used super-resolution microscopy to see the protein machinery used by cells to ‘eat’ nutrients and other molecules. The research, published in Cell, clarifies how 23 of the most important proteins involved in this task organise and assemble themselves. EMBL group leader Jonas Ries led the research alongside collaborators Marko Kaksonen and François Nédélec. Researchers imaged more than 100,000 sites on yeast cell membranes, where molec...
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Art meets structural biology - “I’ve spent my whole life looking at protein structures and there’s nothing quite as beautiful. Today, it’s so nice to see others inspired by these structures.” This is how Janet Thornton, Director Emeritus of the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Senior Scientist welcomed visitors to the opening of the exhibition organised by the Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe). The exhibition, entitled ‘Artworks inspired by life’s building blocks’, runs fro...
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Europe PMC now indexes preprints - Europe PMC, the discovery platform for life science literature, based at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), will include preprint abstracts in the search results, alongside peer-reviewed content, to make science reported in preprints readily discoverable. To begin with, over 37 000 preprints will be available in Europe PMC from July 10, 2018. Europe PMC is an online repository that provides access to worldwide life science research articles,...
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Parental chromosomes kept apart during embryo’s first division - It was long thought that during an embryo’s first cell division, one spindle is responsible for segregating the embryo’s chromosomes into two cells. EMBL scientists now show that there are actually two spindles, one for each set of parental chromosomes, meaning that the genetic information from each parent is kept apart throughout the first division. Science publishes the results – bound to change biology textbooks – on 12 Jul...
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Maternal bacteria persistent in newborns - Their results, published in Cell Host and Microbe on 11 July, provide the basis for a better understanding of how the maternal microbiome impacts child health. Microorganisms pass from mother to child during different stages of natural delivery, as well as in subsequent breastfeeding and skin-to-skin contact. The team’s results show that bacteria from the mother are more likely to colonize newborns compared with bacteria from the surrounding enviro...
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Leukaemia roots detectable years before diagnosis - Scientists at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the Wellcome Sanger Institute and international collaborators have discovered that it is possible to identify people at high risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) years before they suddenly develop the disease. The study, published today in the journal Nature, found that blood tests looking for changes in DNA code can reveal the roots of AML in healthy people. Furth...
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