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Jonya Pacey
Works at Southeastern Libraries Cooperating
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Jonya Pacey

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Jonya Pacey hung out. #hangoutsonair
how does this work again?
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TONY NELSON's profile photoJonya Pacey's profile photo
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Thanks, Tony!  Next time I am online trying this, I won't worry about inviting you in.

My new camera helps, lol. The lag was horridly choppy.

Jonya
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Jonya Pacey

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I am not in favor of this. I do not think these monies should pay for a new Viking stadium. And I'd like to know what other people think. For or against? Share this forward AND email Governor Dayton's office, please.
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Violante de Rojas's profile photoGarret Bitker's profile photoJonya Pacey's profile photoKatie Polley's profile photo
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So libraries don't qualify as cultural institutions worthy of receiving these funds, but a football stadium does? I think not.
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An example of amazing customer service. I love stories like this; I keep them as inspiration to do the little things I do.
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Petra Cosgrove-Tremblay's profile photoJonya Pacey's profile photoThomas Weber's profile photo
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That is a great story! I once worked for Morton's (a lifetime ago). I started as a server back in 95, and made my way to GM in Crystal City VA. They have had their up's and down's; but they are a good company, and I know that they live for moments like this.

Once when I was the Maitre D' at the Conn Ave location in DC, we shipped a lobster by taxi to the Georgetown location for a customer because they had sold out. A great company finds ways to surprise it's customer base and keep it's employees engaged.
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Jonya Pacey

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Morning Fail: I was more than on time for once. Then could not find my keys for about 10 minutes. I snapped at my husband. Road construction had traffic way backed up. Phone decided to dial someone randomly. I was a bit frazzled when I got to work. Stupid way to start the day. These reports better not get in my way today, just saying.
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Have her in circles
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Jonya Pacey

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No idea what this ripple is, no idea how to access it yet, just clogging the web with it as requested. heh. something to look into later.
Glenn Thomas originally shared:
 
This is a Google+ Ripple test.

You need to reshare this publicly for it to work!

The more reshares the more interesting the test will be.

This will be posted on imSocial.com after we complete the test.

To view the ripple: http://plus.google.com/ripples/details?activityid=K8zv4tBUioB
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Tegan Brandi's profile photoJonya Pacey's profile photo
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That was it! Thanks.
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Jonya Pacey

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At #UMRUG in St. Cloud! About to call them to order as we have a busy, busy agenda today.
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Jonya Pacey

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Juuuust Sharing!! hehe.
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Ariel Duschanek-Myers's profile photo
 
Sexual tension, can you feel it?
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Patrick Anderson's profile photoJonya Pacey's profile photoMarti Fuerst's profile photo
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This is the first I've heard of the superduke thing as well. And I can totally see why someone would want to fight for their loved one. At the same time, Her Grace Fina Ingen Aeda shared some words at the Coronation of Northshield's current Majesty's Vladmir and Petranella, when Her Excellency Lusche was inducted into the Order of the Rose - a consort is a gift the fighter is giving the kingdom, because that fighter, inspired by the consort, believes that the consort would be an asset as royalty. It was very lovely, and I'm not doing Her Grace justice.

I totally agree with this sentiment, but I also think that as the face of the kingdom, royals need to represent both genders. With the ability to name champions (not just martial) and other members of a retinue, there's no reason why a same-sex couple can't share the dias. Besides, being royalty should be about serving the populous.
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This is a public post that +Phil Sandifer posted yesterday, and I'm sharing it forward publicly. For my two children, and for their generation. I ask you to read this essay and comment. I want to hear what you have to say.
Phil Sandifer originally shared:
 
Roses Too

One of the memes going around in response to Occupy Wall Street is the idea that the protesters are at fault for their own lack of employment for refusing to take jobs at McDonalds and the like. And I think this is one where a lot of people have an intuitive sense of why it's an unfair criticism, but are hesitant to put it into words for fear of walking into some sort of rhetorical trap. Which, to be fair, it clearly is - I'm sure plenty of people on the right would like nothing more than for someone to come out and be arrogant enough to say they're too good for minimum wage work. But being too nervous to say that means that we're losing out on the opportunity to make a larger point, so I'll go ahead and walk into that trap. Yes. I believe that I am entitled to a better-than-minimum-wage job. I believe, in fact, that almost everyone marching in the streets of New York City today is entitled to that. And I think that if we are anything less than completely honest about this belief, we risk abandoning the basic heart of the movement.

Here's the thing: no serious thought about social justice in the last century has focused entirely on survival. None. All of them have fought equally passionately, and often more passionately, for human dignity. And this is something that the right's assault on the progressive movement and it's gains over the last century has erased. An entire vast legacy of social justice is lost when we treat the fight for economic equality as purely about the basic conditions of survival such as food, shelter, and health care.

The most famous version of this actually celebrates its 100th birthday this year - James Oppenheim's 1911 poem "Bread and Roses" was published in December of 1911 in The American Magazine. It would go on to be one of the most memorable slogans of the labor movement, most associated (albeit possibly wrongly) with the 1920 textile strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where, as the story goes, women marched with signs declaring "We want bread, yes. But roses too." The slogan has aged incredibly well over the last century. I'm honestly a bit disappointed not to have seen it in any of the hundreds of signs I've seen at the protests around the world. Because it captures the heart of the issue.

I, along with many of those who are involved with or support Occupy Wall Street, am part of a generation that was remarkably well-treated in childhood. I have no illusions that I did not benefit wildly from the explosion of consumerism in the 80s and 90s that led to the mass purchase of things like video game systems, personal computers, expansive libraries, etc. On top of that, my generation is superbly educated. We were pushed, very hard, on the logic that having an education always helped you and that if you wanted a job you should go to college. This is a good thing. Regardless of whatever else I may begrudge the decades of economic expansion for the rich, the massive increase in education levels my generation received were amazingly good things.

But it's not just the education. We were taught to value education. We were taught that the life of the mind was important. We weren't just made an astonishingly smart generation, we were made a generation that respected intelligence.

But it also means that there is a massive bait and switch involved in now saying that my generation should suck it up and take minimum wage jobs. Because you know what? Taking someone with a college or even a graduate degree and shoving them in a mall selling blouses is degrading. Telling them that all of the intelligence and education they've cultivated is worthless and that their sole value is as a physical laborer is horrifically demeaning. And it's demeaning in a way that a lot of the stories told by those who accuse us of being entitled don't capture. There's a big difference between taking a minimum wage laborer job at 17 fresh out of high school and doing it at 25 with a graduate degree. A minimum wage job is appropriate for an unskilled and untrained laborer. It's not for someone with six years of specialist training. And we were told to get the specialist training, often with the threat that "if you don't go to college, you'll just end up flipping burgers." Now we're told that if we don't go flip burgers, we're slackers and entitled whiners. Never mind that we went into tens of thousands of dollars of debt on the promise that it would keep us from doing exactly that.

And that's part of what we're fighting for. The right not to have the world we were raised to live in taken away from us so that billionaires can afford a second yacht. The right to not have to work twice as hard to have half of what our parents had, and to live with comfort and dignity. We're saying that it's more important to provide fulfilling work for a generation that we educated and taught to value that education than it is to have as much money as possible being made in the world.

We're not just demanding that our generation not be left to die in the streets. I mean, yes, we're demanding that too. But the larger issue is one of respect. We played by the rules. We went to school, studied hard, and did everything we were told. And now society is telling us that we're slackers and freeloaders who have done something wrong. And yes, we're angry about that. Of course we're angry about it. How would anyone not be angry about finding out that even though they've done everything right, the rules have been changed?

Especially because under the new rules, we've already lost. We got degrees in useless fields and even if we were to go back to school (taking out even more crippling student loan debt to do it) and retrain in a new field, we'd just be flushing away a year of working life and income and ensuring that we will never build up enough to retire on. And that's assuming that being a 30-35 year old recent graduate with no work experience is ever going to get you a job. In other words, by doing what we were told, we've now been led to sacrifice our financial futures. Permanently. It is already too late for much of my generation to have a comfortable retirement instead of working themselves to death.

So do we have a sense of entitlement? Of course we do. Freely admitted. We believe we are entitled not to have been the victims of a multi-billion dollar con.

But what's not admitted is that the billionaire class has a sense of entitlement too. They believe that the mere fact that they acquired a billion dollars is justification for why they deserve it. Whether it was inherited, invested towards, or worked towards (and as has been pointed out countless times, nobody makes even a million dollars entirely from their own labor), they believe that the fact that they have wealth means they're entitled to keep it.

Me? I just believe I'm entitled to a job that makes use of the skills I trained to acquire, and entitled to eventually make enough money to retire. I don't want to be a millionaire. I want to teach college students about literature, and eventually retire to a modest apartment in a city somewhere and a life of reading and writing for my own edification. I don't want a handout. I want to do the work I spent over a decade training to be good at.

If my sense of entitlement bothers you more than people who believe themselves entitled to mansions and yachts, frankly, the problem isn't with me.

"As we come marching, marching, unnumbered women dead
Go crying through our singing their ancient cry for bread.
Small art and love and beauty their drudging spirits knew.
Yes, it is bread we fight for -- but we fight for roses, too!" - James Oppenheim, 1911.
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Laura Turpin's profile photoMike Patty's profile photoJessica Neal's profile photoKatie Polley's profile photo
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Schooling is good for teaching theory but bad for real world experience. If one has valuable skills, then find a way to put them to use. Solve a problem with your skill and people will line up with money in hand waiting for you to solve their problem. If one is entitled to a job, healthcare, an education, etc, where does it stop? Is everyone also entitled to be rich? If you want to join the group of elites then take on the risk like the Fords, Rockefellers, the late Sam Walton and others that carved a name out for themselves with ingenuity and hard work. If you want to join the status quo, continue doing what youre doing and wait for a handout...
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Have her in circles
231 people
Jacob Aufderheide's profile photo
Mary Kirk's profile photo
Setembrina Bramante's profile photo
Gayle Bitker's profile photo
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  • Southeastern Libraries Cooperating
    ILS Manager, 2012 - present
  • Southeastern Libraries Cooperating
    IT Help Desk Manager, 1999 - 2012
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