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Dougal Campbell
1,498 followers -
Building the web since before you knew there was a web.
Building the web since before you knew there was a web.

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Okay, I got Danny Havenith’s water torture animation ported to FastLED. Source code is on Gitub:

https://github.com/dougalcampbell/water_torture_fled

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Okay, I promised I’d show my “glitchy” Christmas Lights (for a Stranger Things themed Halloween party). As I mentioned before, I didn’t have time to do this like I really wanted, so I plan to redo it eventually. The effect is supposed to look like lights that are getting power surges and brownouts. So I’m basically just semi-randomly fiddling the global brightness, and sometimes adding in a “glitter” effect. “Semi” random, because I’m adding two random numbers to get a Gaussian distribution, allowing some cases to occur more often than others. I’ll post a link to a gist of the relevant code in the comments, later.

Quick! Point me to the best Christmas themed patterns for a strip of 50 lights!

Going to a Stranger Things themed Halloween party tonight. I’m going to be Chief Hopper, and my wife as Joyce Beyers. I’m making her a battery powered string of Christmas lights to carry around (WS2812).

I’m planning to make some glitchy effects to layer on top, too.

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Okay, not quite on-topic, but...
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Off-topic: Has anyone ever tried driving WS2812 LEDs with an analog circuit instead of a microcontroller? Like if you used 555s to drive multiple oscillating signals at slightly different frequencies, added them together, and used that for your data line (maybe with another timer to latch the signal periodically, to guarantee that the accumulated data gets displayed).

I'm sure that unless you got the frequencies into specific ranges, you'd probably just end up with what looked like noise, but I just wondered if anyone had ever tried it...

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What's a good way to power a smallish portable project? My wife has a clear "bubble" umbrella, and I've been wanting to add LEDs to it. There are 8 struts, each about 2ft long. So with 30/m strips, I should get 20 LEDs per strut, for a total of 160 lights.

Obviously, I'm going to avoid trying to light them all simultaneously at full brightness (9.6A). I have a bunch of 18650 LiPos (3.7V, 3000 mAh). I figure I'd probably need to put some in series @ 7.4V, then use a regulator back down to 5V. Any suggestion for one that will get a decent current output?

I'll probably use a Teensy (3.2?) to drive things. Should I use an OctoWS2812, too, or could I get away with skipping that? Also, could a Teensy LC drive 8 outputs, or would it be too limited for this?

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Hey folks, a while back I received my Tessel 2, but I just haven't had much time for hobby projects. But a few days ago, I finally pulled it out, just planning to tinker a little bit with some LED strips and rings. Only to find out that the T2 firmware doesn't have any support for WS8211/12 yet.

The T2 runs OpenWRT on a MediaTek SOC for wifi and programming via JavaScript (nodejs), with a SAMD21 for interfacing to the world. Is there anyone here who might be able to help in their efforts to get a low level driver working? There's an open issue here:
https://github.com/tessel/t2-firmware/issues/24

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Halloween Blinky Eyes project.
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10/9/15
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"Ours go to Eleven."
Originally shared by ****
The Eleven is a hackable desktop 3D printer with an open-air design: http://bit.ly/1Ooaapg

#Atmel   #3DPrinter   #3DPrinting   #Kickstarter  (via +ISG3D)
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