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"The Global Warming Policy Foundation has enlisted an international team of five distinguished scientists to carry out a full inquiry
Last month, we are told, the world enjoyed “its hottest March since records began in 1880”. This year, according to “US government scientists”, already bids to outrank 2014 as “the hottest ever”. The figures from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) were based, like all the other three official surface temperature records on which the world’s scientists and politicians rely, on data compiled from a network of weather stations by NOAA’s Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN).
But here there is a puzzle. These temperature records are not the only ones with official status. The other two, Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) and the University of Alabama (UAH), are based on a quite different method of measuring temperature data, by satellites. And these, as they have increasingly done in recent years, give a strikingly different picture. Neither shows last month as anything like the hottest March on record, any more than they showed 2014 as (the hottest year ever)”.

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
The Global Warming Policy Foundation has enlisted an international team of five distinguished scientists to carry out a full inquiry
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Wouldn't it be nice if the temperature data was fully accessible? I'm talking about the raw, pre-homogenized data, with full transparency to what the algorithms are doing.

If it is available, and I've missed it, I'd love someone to point me in the right direction.
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Bob Carter originally posted:

https://plus.google.com/+BobCalder/posts/Ak3yJpprid3

(reposted by +Jim Stuttard)
USACE's Sacramento District awarded a $5.1 million contract April 17 for the design and construction of a smart grid control system for renewable energy… - Bob Calder - Google+
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"High elevation environments around the world may be warming much faster than previously thought, according to members of an international research team. They call for more aggressive monitoring of temperature changes in mountain regions and more attention to the potential consequences of warming".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
High elevation environments around the world may be warming much faster than previously thought, according to members of an international research team. They call for more aggressive monitoring of temperature changes in mountain regions and more attention to the potential consequences of warming.
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"The recent slowdown in the rise of global average air temperatures will make no difference to how much the planet will warm by 2100, a new study has found".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
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"You can't predict the outcome of a marathon from the runners' times in the first few miles. You’ve got to see the whole race. Global climate change is like that: You can't understand it if all you have is a few years of data from a few locations. That's one reason that a fourth-generation satellite launching this summer is something to get excited about.
Jason-3, a mission led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration that is currently scheduled to launch on July 22, is the latest in a series of U.S.-European satellite missions that have been measuring the height of the ocean surface for 23 years. Sea level height is a critical piece of evidence about Earth's natural cycles and how humans are affecting our planet. Knowing sea level height also improves hurricane forecasts, navigation and the efficiency of fisheries and other offshore industries.
Most people think that, except for waves, the ocean is flat. It's not. The ocean has topography just as land does. Ocean currents cause hills and valleys in the sea surface that vary in height by more than six feet (two meters) from one place to another. And just as Earth's rocky landscapes change because of erosion and many other causes, its watery hills and valleys also change. High points on the sea surface tend to be over warm water and valleys over cold water, with currents flowing around the hills and valleys. Because the ocean absorbs more than 90 percent of the heat trapped by human-emitted greenhouse gases, monitoring the changing ocean topography is a key to understanding how the ocean responds to and influences climate change.
Of course, the ocean changes naturally as well, with cycles like the Pacific Ocean's El Niño and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), which change the height and temperature of the sea surface. Scientists want to understand these natural cycles better. "Jason-3 might witness a new phase of the PDO," said Josh Willis of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA's Jason-3 project scientist. The current cold phase produces colder-than-normal sea surface temperatures in the East Pacific; some oceanographers have theorized that the reason global atmospheric temperatures have not increased significantly since about 2000 is that the PDO switched to its cold phase at that time, and the cooler ocean surface has moderated air temperatures ever since".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
Jason-3 will add to a 23-year data set used to study climate change and ocean cycles like El Niño, as well as for hurricane forecasts, navigation and other ocean needs.
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"Scientists are calling on world leaders to sign up to an eight-point plan of action at landmark talks in Paris.
The key element is the goal to limit global warming to below 2C by moving to zero carbon emissions by 2050.
The UN meeting in December is "the last chance" to avert dangerous climate change, according to the Earth League.
Scientific evidence shows this can be achieved, but only with bold action now, says an alliance of climate researchers from 17 institutions.
The statement involves eight calls for action:
Limiting global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius
Keeping future CO2 emissions below 1,000 gigatonnes (billion tonnes)
Creating a zero-carbon society by 2050
Equity of approach - with richer countries helping poorer ones
Technological research and innovation
A global strategy to address loss and damage from climate change
Safeguarding ecosystems such as forests and oceans that absorb CO2
Providing climate finance for developing countries.
Chair of the Earth League, Johan Rockstrom, of the Stockholm Resilience Centre in Sweden, said the statement set out the scientific stance on what needed to happen at the Paris talks".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
Climate scientists are calling on world leaders to sign up to an eight-point plan of action at landmark talks in Paris.
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"A worldwide study of the interplay between organisms and their environment bolsters the idea that greater biodiversity helps maintain more stable and productive ecosystems".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
A worldwide study of the interplay between organisms and their environment bolsters the idea that greater biodiversity helps maintain more stable and productive ecosystems.
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"The United States and seven other Arctic nations vowed Friday to work together to combat climate change at the top of the world and put aside tensions over Ukraine and Russian military activities.
As the United States assumed chairmanship of the Arctic Council, a multinational group formed to address environmental and economic issues, Secretary of State John F. Kerry said that the Arctic is undergoing profound climate change at an alarming pace that will affect northern coastal communities and, eventually, the world.
“We’re on a dangerous path,” said Kerry, citing rising methane and soot emissions from diesel engines, airplane exhaust and wood-burning fires, all of which cover snow and absorb the sun’s heat, speeding warming".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
The U.S. becomes chair of the Arctic Council as the region is warming faster than any place on Earth.
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"Single-cell organisms called microbes are rapidly devouring the ancient carbon being released from thawing permafrost soil and ultimately releasing it back into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, according to new research. Increased carbon dioxide levels, of course, cause the Earth to warm and accelerate thawing".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
Single-cell organisms called microbes are rapidly devouring the ancient carbon being released from thawing permafrost soil and ultimately releasing it back into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, according to new research. Increased carbon dioxide levels, of course, cause the Earth to warm and accelerate thawing.
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Hum, the article mentions methane in no way, except possibly indirectly as the carbon in raw form released by the thawing permafrost, but in this case having it converted to carbon dioxide before release in the atmosphere would be advantageous...
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"With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps, a key step to beginning routine science operations next month.
SMAP launched Jan. 31 on a minimum three-year mission to map global soil moisture and detect whether soils are frozen or thawed. The mission will help scientists understand the links among Earth's water, energy and carbon cycles; help reduce uncertainties in predicting weather and climate; and enhance our ability to monitor and predict natural hazards such as floods and droughts".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
NASA's new satellite mission to map the water in the soil under our feet has passed another key milestone by generating its first full global maps.
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"Researchers need to find ways to measure how the changes in climate are affecting biodiversity. One of the best places to look may be down at our feet, at beetles. That`s because, as a research team discovered after doing the first large-scale survey of Arctic beetles, these six-legged critters are not only abundant in number but also diverse in feeding habits and what they eat is closely linked to the latitude in which they are found".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
Researchers need to find ways to measure how the changes in climate are affecting biodiversity. One of the best places to look may be down at our feet, at beetles. That`s because, as a research team discovered after doing the first large-scale survey of Arctic beetles, these six-legged critters are not only abundant in number but also diverse in feeding habits and what they eat is closely linked to the latitude in which they are found.
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"Tropical Pacific climate variations and their global weather impacts may be predicted much further in advance than previously thought, according to research by an international team of climate scientists. The source of this predictability lies in the tight interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere and among the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Such long-term tropical climate forecasts are useful to the public and policy makers, researchers say".

(Posted by +rasha kamel​)
Tropical Pacific climate variations and their global weather impacts may be predicted much further in advance than previously thought, according to research by an international team of climate scientists. The source of this predictability lies in the tight interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere and among the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Such long-term tropical climate forecasts are useful to the public and policy makers...
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Introduction
The Azimuth Project is an international collaboration to create a focal point for scientists and engineers interested in saving the planet. Our goal is to make clearly presented, accurate information on the relevant issues easy to find, and to help people work together on our common problems.  We need your help! 

The Azimuth Project includes a wiki, a blog, and a discussion forum

This Azimuth page here on Google+ lets you keep track of news related to energy, the environment and sustainability.  Posts on this page are written by Rasha Kamel, John Baez, Jim Stuttard, Frederik De Roo and David Tanzer.  The posts reflect the individual authors views and taste; we don't agree about everything!