Profile

Cover photo
priyadarshi sahoo
Works at Infosys
Lives in Cleveland
457 followers|29,750 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

priyadarshi sahoo

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Today you, Tomorrow me.

I challenge you in the next 7 days show your humanity by doing something simple for a perfect stranger.

+martin shervington +Tom Rolfson +Bruce Garber +Maria Quiban +Paul Roustan +Stacy Frazer +Christopher Lira +Stephanie Van Pelt

Pick your team and pass it on

1
Add a comment...

priyadarshi sahoo

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
By the peak of the dotcom boom at the end of the 1990s, when SoftBank was worth $180 billion, Son was reported to be worth $78 billion—a number that dropped by more than $70 billion in the crash. It was supposedly the largest financial loss by any one person ever. SoftBank’s stock price in 2000 was 198,000 yen, which fell to 1,542 yen two years later. As Wired noted back in 2004, “SoftBank blew billions more on Asahi TV, Asia Global Crossing, SKY Perfect, and a throng of dotcom dogs: Kozmo.com, More.com, SportsBrain. Webvan? Yep, that was him.”

The bottom line? “I think he’s going to give AT&T and Verizon a run for their money,” Schaede said.
1
Add a comment...

priyadarshi sahoo

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
How To Make Almost Anything.
The Digital Fabrication Revolution.
http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/138154/neil-gershenfeld/how-to-make-almost-anything?page=show

This is an excellent article by Neil Gershenfeld from MIT and Fab Lab fame, and is easily the longest article that I have sat down to read in its entirety in the last couple of months. It was shared via my stream a couple of days ago but I’m sorry I can’t remember by who and so can’t give appropriate credit. The article traces the history of printing and digital fabrication through to the modern day and extrapolates into likely futures. One of the key excerpts is where Neil discusses the Drexler-esque vision that they are currently working on in his lab: 

The digitization of material is not a new idea. It is four billion years old, going back to the evolutionary age of the ribosome, the protein that makes proteins. Humans are full of molecular machinery, from the motors that move our muscles to the sensors in our eyes. The ribosome builds all that machinery out of a microscopic version of LEGO pieces, amino acids, of which there are 22 different kinds. The sequence for assembling the amino acids is stored in DNA and is sent to the ribosome in another protein called messenger RNA. The code does not just describe the protein to be manufactured; it becomes the new protein.
 
Labs like mine are now developing 3-D assemblers (rather than printers) that can build structures in the same way as the ribosome. The assemblers will be able to both add and remove parts from a discrete set. One of the assemblers we are developing works with components that are a bit bigger than amino acids, cluster of atoms about ten nanometers long (an amino acid is around one nanometer long). These can have properties that amino acids cannot, such as being good electrical conductors or magnets. The goal is to use the nanoassembler to build nanostructures, such as 3-D integrated circuits. Another assembler we are developing uses parts on the scale of microns to millimeters. We would like this machine to make the electronic circuit boards that the 3-D integrated circuits go on. Yet another assembler we are developing uses parts on the scale of centimeters, to make larger structures, such as aircraft components and even whole aircraft that will be lighter, stronger, and more capable than today’s planes -- think a jumbo jet that can flap its wings.

A key difference between existing 3-D printers and these assemblers is that the assemblers will be able to create complete functional systems in a single process. They will be able to integrate fixed and moving mechanical structures, sensors and actuators, and electronics. Even more important is what the assemblers don’t create: trash. Trash is a concept that applies only to materials that don’t contain enough information to be reusable. All the matter on the forest floor is recycled again and again. Likewise, a product assembled from digital materials need not be thrown out when it becomes obsolete. It can simply be disassembled and the parts reconstructed into something new.

Pretty exciting; the stuff transhumanist porn is made of.
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
457 people
djfhye mudhjr's profile photo
William Volk's profile photo
Rex Malson's profile photo
News 24.com's profile photo
Jacinta Pereira's profile photo
prasath s's profile photo
Bu Ka's profile photo
Learning Matters's profile photo
Ahmed Hasan's profile photo

priyadarshi sahoo

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
One more howto, which may become a page for our book, the one that talks about failure, giving up, starting up again, and the odds of success:
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/annavital/becoming-an-entrepreneur-infographic-book/posts/389248
2
1
Amid Yousef's profile photo
 
How true
Add a comment...

priyadarshi sahoo

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Got 3 minutes to learn about procrastination? Don't put this off until later!
1
Add a comment...

priyadarshi sahoo

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Very excited to announce 4 new courses with industry leaders. Now open for enrollment! ow.ly/eAj3G
1
Add a comment...

priyadarshi sahoo

Shared publicly  - 
 
Sounds too good to be true...

Neonode Smartphone I multi touch solution launches

http://www.slashgear.com/neonode-smartphone-i-multi-touch-solution-launches-11251374/
Neonode has announced the market introduction of its new smartphone platform promising to be a low-cost and high-performance touch solution for feature phones
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
457 people
djfhye mudhjr's profile photo
William Volk's profile photo
Rex Malson's profile photo
News 24.com's profile photo
Jacinta Pereira's profile photo
prasath s's profile photo
Bu Ka's profile photo
Learning Matters's profile photo
Ahmed Hasan's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Cleveland
Links
Other profiles
Contributor to
Work
Employment
  • Infosys
    Technology Lead, 2005 - present
Basic Information
Gender
Male