Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Daryl Hunt
5,533 followers -
A secular humanist who enjoys his Kindle and engaging with others
A secular humanist who enjoys his Kindle and engaging with others

5,533 followers
About
Communities and Collections
View all
Posts

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
15/01/2018
9 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
PhotoPhotoPhoto
08/01/2018
3 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Reading a Play is Different to Reading a Novel.

Reading a Play is different to reading a Novel. I know I am saying the bleeding obvious but it is. To day I finished rereading "Kids Stakes" even though I have read it a number of times before the characters still reach out from the pages of Lawler's play just as powerfully as they did on my first ever read through. Even though I know what is going to happen I still feel like yelling at them (not good in a coffee shop) cheering with them and shedding a tear with them. For me reading a Play is a much slower process then reading a Novel. especially a Play that has lots of stage directions written. I find myself stopping and in my minds eye seeing the characters moving around the stage and talking. Because "Kids Stakes" is the first part of "The Doll Trilogy" I keep asking myself as I read does this play stand on its own? would people watching who have no knowledge of the rest of the trilogy be able to enjoy "kids Stakes" for what it is?

These are subjective questions but I believe the answer to them is "Yes" Almost twenty year ago when I directed Summer of the Seventeenth Doll I to was swept up in the roller coaster ride of emotions and each night as I watched the final harrowing scene as Olive basically had a mental break down right in front of the audience I shed a tear, a tear for all that she and the other had lost., a tear for what I had lost. Great writing allows you to invest yourself in the characters and in doing that you open yourself up to feeling everything they feel. When Summer of The Seventeenth Doll came to an end I decided that I did not want Olive to be remembered for her harrowing end but I wanted her and her fellow characters to return and for an audience, a new audience to meet them, not at the end of their journey but this time at the beginning. It's taken me almost twenty years to get around to it but as I said

"Reading a Play is different to reading a Novel"
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded