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Bob and Joy Schwabach
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Bob and Joy Schwabach write the "On Computers" newspaper column.
Bob and Joy Schwabach write the "On Computers" newspaper column.

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An exchange of emails with a reader on the subject of falling prices for large storage drives, led to an inevitable question: What are they good for? http://oncomp.com/2018/10/really-big-numbers/
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This week's column: Defend Your Phone

Users and Apple say the iPhone is the safest smartphone out there, but you can make it safer still.

Start with the log-on. Do you use a fingerprint? You should. Joy initially had difficulties getting her Android phone to recognize her index finger. The solution was to use more fingers. Now she uses her middle finger to get into the phone, and this one rarely misses. (No comments, please.) If you have an iPhone X, you can use your face instead of a fingerprint. It’s rumored that all iPhones coming out this fall will have “Face ID.” It’s inevitable.

What about a hacker breaking into your iCloud account on the web? It’s a good idea to set up “two-factor identification.” If you Google that phrase, along with “iPhone,” (or Android if that’s what you use), you can find simple instructions for setting it up. With two-factor ID, you’ll need a code that was just emailed, phoned, or texted to you as well as your password, whenever you’re logging on from a new machine. This stops the bad guy or girl in their tracks.

There is a device called “GrayKey,” which its maker claims can crack any iPhone password or code. It comes in two versions, one for $15,000 and one for $30,000, used by some police departments and presumably some government agencies. An Israeli firm, “Cellebrite,” will crack a cellphone code for you for $5,000 a pop. That’s plus airfare, because you have to bring the phone to Israel.

If it’s installing phone apps you’re worried about, try the free Malwarebytes mobile app for iPhone or Android, which blocks anything suspicious. In our test, it tagged an app called “Lost Android,” so we removed it. If we ever lose our phone and it isn’t in range of Alexa or our Google Home speaker, either of which can make our phone ring to announce its location or its address, we can go to MyAccount.Google.com and click “find my phone.”

A $12-a-year version of Malwarebytes’ mobile app can screen and block scam calls and texts. It can also unlock your phone if you’re a victim of “ransomware.” In a ransomware attack, you’re asked to pay a sum of money to get your phone unlocked, but Malwarebyes can do that for you for no extra charge. You get a 30-day free trial of this premium version when you download the free version.

Book Shout

Joy has a bookstore habit and buys more books than she reads. A free app called “BookShout” fixes that.

BookShout sets a daily goal for you, with a progress bar that moves along as you’re reading a book. After reading just 1000 words, Joy got a congratulatory email. After 5,000 words, she received 50 cents in BookShout bucks. The first day, she ranked 1535 among her friends, but quickly moved up to 534 a few days later. It’s all so gratifying, she might just finish a book called “Only Humans Need Apply,” which chronicles the rise of robots. (These robots can also read books, though their reviews are somewhat mechanical.)

To start, either download the app from the app store onto your phone, or go to bookshout.com to read books on your computer. We compared Bookshout’s e-book prices with Amazon’s and found them to be identical. BookShout also has a category called “free books.”

Though some reviewers have balked at reading books inside anything other than the Amazon Kindle app, Joy likes seeing the progress bar move along towards the daily goal. You can switch from one book to another and still get credit for reading. If you don’t like getting congratulatory emails, you can turn those off.

Internuts

AffordableCollegesOnline.org ranks online programs at a huge variety of colleges, from state schools to the Ivy League.

MrOwl.com lets you save your favorite websites to a page that others can see. If they like your collections or you like theirs, you can “heart” them. We clicked “history” and learned that a Union commander in the Civil War issued orders freeing the slaves in South Carolina, Florida and Georgia, though this was well beyond his authority. The orders were rescinded by President Lincoln ten days later.

Recovering Photos on Your iPhone
We don’t own an iPhone, but the site Comparitech.com gave us some good tips for recovering photos from one.

First, open the Photos app on your iPhone. Look at the bottom right-hand corner of the screen and tap “Albums.” Scroll down and look at “Recently Deleted,” which has all the photos you deleted in the last 30 days. Your lost photo might be there. Now tap “Select” in the upper right and choose the photos you want back. Then tap “Recover.”

Next, try logging on to iCloud.com. Your photos may have been automatically backed up there. Tap “Photos” to see everything saved. If your storage is full, use the iTunes app to back up your photos to your computer. If you’ve done this regularly, you can recover any lost photo. Even easier: Download the free “Google Photos” app. It will automatically back up any photos you’ve taken with your phone. Google Photos gives you unlimited storage space if you are willing to limit photo resolution to 16 megapixels and video resolution to 1080p. If you store at higher resolutions, it counts against your Google Drive quota of 15 gigabytes.

The Numbers Report

Google has 31 percent of the world’s digital ad market, according to research firm eMarketer, generating $85 billion in revenue. Facebook is second, with 18 percent. Google also owns YouTube and gets another $9.13 billion in ad revenue from there.

Hey Google!

If you have the “Google Home” speaker, you no longer have to say “Hey Google,” every time you want its attention. If eight seconds or less have passed since your last question, you can just ask a follow-up, which doesn’t have to be related to the first one.

But first you have to set this up. Go to the Google Home app on your phone. Look for the three stacked lines called the “hamburger icon” or the word “menu.” Tap it, then tap “more settings.” Tap “preferences” and turn on “continued conversation.” While you’re there, tap “Getting Around” and tell Google how you usually get around — car, public transportation, walking, biking, jet pack, etc. The next time you ask for directions, the Google assistant will tailor her response to your preferred mode of movement.
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(this week's column)

We got a guide from Play-Free-Online-Games.com. The exact page is impossible to find in a search, so we’re giving you the gist of it here. Actually, these things are fun, and you can’t beat the price.

Shooter Games. If you like to fly through space, try “Battleship Galactica” or “Ace Online.” If you prefer to fight on the ground and like monsters and werewolves, try “Wolf Team.” If you prefer mummies, try “Mission Against Terror.” If you would rather fight the military, and like World War II vintage tanks, try “World of Tanks.” If you prefer a deadly cartoon soldier, try “Lost Saga.”
Role-Playing Games. If you like fantasy, join ten million others in “World of Warcraft.” If you’ve been there, done that, try “Runes of Magic,” “Adventure Quest Worlds” or “Dragon Fable.” If your age is a single digit, try “Wizard 101.” If you want an easy sci-fi game, try “Dark Orbit.” To perfect the art of crushing your enemies, try “Age of Conan.” If you like “Dungeons and Dragons,” try “Crystal Saga,” “Forsaken World,” “Drakensang,” “Dark Swords,” “Dungeons and Dragons Online,” or “Lord of the Rings.” If you’re old enough to remember when “The Incredibles” came out, try “DC Universe Online.” If not, try “Superhero Squad Online.” If being a vampire hunting a werewolf is strange enough for you, try “Bitefight.” If not, try “Glitch.”
If you like a fantasy setting, try “Call of the Gods,” or “Grepolis.” If you like a historical setting, try “Castle Empire,” “Travian,” “1100 A.D.,” or “Tribal Wars.” If you like games with blocks or Legos, try “Minecraft” or “Roblox.” To make new friends, try “IMVU.” If you mainly want to create things, try “Second Life.”

Portable Speakers and All That Jazz

It has become clear to us over many years that there is a secret meeting place, perhaps in a remote mountain location, most likely in Bhutan, where the makers of electronic devices gather to decide what to promote for the coming holiday season. There is no other explanation for what are clearly waves of gadgets and stuff that wash over us every year.

For some time now, we have received pitches for earphones and speakers. Apparently, no one can fully appreciate rock or rap without special equipment, which is quite understandable. Nor are they able to distinguish what actors are saying on their television sets without a yard-long bar that delivers clear enunciation even when it is not intended; after all, a grunt is a grunt and that is the essence of an action movie.

There was a recent wave for smart TVs, one for protective smartphone cases, another for home antennas, and a constant effort to make a cell phone the movie camera of our time.

So we received a wireless speaker for review. We went to a nearby store and found that there were several of these on the market and they seem quite similar. So there is little point in trying to figure out which is the best, because that will depend on the individual’s ear and taste, meaning pop, rock or classical.

But we can look at what they’re good for. These new portable Bluetooth speakers are all about the size of a soup can and range in price from $20 to $350. Sound quality is pretty good and – if they’re waterproof – you can wash them with soap and water. On a more practical level you can download an app to let you wake up to music or news delivered at a clear understandable level.

A good way to start is the free Pandora app from your phone’s app store. Tap the hamburger icon (three stacked lines) in the upper left corner of the screen and choose “settings,” then “Alarm Clock.” Tap it to set the time and the station you want to listen to. A station can be the name of a band, such as “The Beatles” or “Benny Goodman.”

Coming this month to the free Clock app from Google is the music service Spotify. The nice thing about Spotify is that you can name a specific song rather than a radio station. For instance, if we ask for the Tijuana Brass on Pandora, we get a lot of Bert Kaempfert. We like Bert a lot; he gave the Beatles their first big gig in Germany, and launched their career. But sometimes we want the original: Herb Alpert.

We tried the new “Sbode 6 Bluetooth Portable Waterproof Speaker,” a six-inch wireless speaker. Besides playing music, audio books, and other sounds from our phone, it takes phone calls. The sound quality was good and the price $36 reasonable.

It’s hard to choose one of these speakers over another, unless you go by price. For $36 on Amazon, the Sbode seems a good deal. The manual leaves much to be desired, however. While the sound blared out at us, we struggled to read the tiny print on how to turn down the volume. The manual says to “short press” the minus button on the side of the speaker to decrease the volume. Pressing short or long turns out to be subjective; Bob’s short press had no effect either way and the long press was enough to blast you out of the room. They’re quite rugged. Though we wouldn’t try this, they say you can clean them with running water, and wipe off any amount of sand or snow. The speakers also have an FM radio, and a slot for a micro sd storage card.

The Cutting Edge

We usually ignore crowd-funding campaigns but this one broke a record; it took in almost 28 million dollars in 30 days. They call it the “GlowForge,” and it’s for engraving on wood and similar materials. The basic model; is $2,500.

There are cheaper 3D laser cutters available, but users say the cheapies have more of a learning curve and some use software infected with malware. There are more expensive ones too: A $35,000 laser used in commercial applications is, as you might expect, much faster than the $2500 or $6000 model GlowForge.

We saw a GlowForge for $4000 on Amazon, but users say the cheaper one from GlowForge.com is all that most beginners will need. Bob said he would cut Western scenes or a Tarzan adventure on veneer for custom furniture. That’s if he ever wanted to go into the custom furniture business.

Take a look at the user forum to find out what others are making. Popular right now: cheap ceramic tiles from Home Depot turned into coasters. Users color in the engraved areas with Sharpie marking pens. The excess ink wipes off the unengraved areas.

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(this week's column)

All of the artists we know paint the old-fashioned way: with a brush. But we’re fairly awed by what you can do with a mouse or a tablet.

The new Corel “Painter 2019” is out, and it’s worth taking a look at what artists are doing with it. Some of these people start with a photo, and produce the kind of work sold at art festivals. After some digging we found them on Instagram. Go to Instagram.com/CorelPainter to get a little awe for yourself.

We were curious about trying it ourselves. So we installed the free trial version from painterartist.com, and clicked on “Discovery Center” inside the program. This was Joy’s job, and she encountered some difficulty right away. Tutorials have to be approved by a long line of corporate types who feel they have to make some changes or they’re not doing their job. All bases must be covered. The trouble with covering all the bases is that long before you’ve touched them all, you feel like dumping the whole program. In short: Too much information. Much too much information.

Hacking her way through the underbrush of Corel tutorials, she was intrigued to see one titled “painting like Bob Ross.” Though now deceased, Ross still appears on public television in re-runs and they’re still popular. This software will not paint a Bob Ross painting for you, but explains his methods. Go to Learn.corel.com/tutorials/paint-your-very-own-mystic-mountain.

The biggest change in the latest version of Painter is its look and speed. Everything loads much faster, and the background is dark so as not to intrude on your art. They’ve added more brushes, like Real Watercolor, Real Wet Oil, and Sargent. Video game designers and concept artists can paint with five new patterns. If your Windows computer has a touch screen, you can use your fingers to reset a picture, zoom in or out of the scene, or pan around.

The program isn’t cheap at $429, but there is an “education edition” for only $99. Many companies have these education version deals, and usually you just have to give a student or faculty I.D.; sometimes you don’t have to show anything. If you want to try other digital art programs for free, and have already finished the Corel Painter free-trial period, try “MyPaint,” “Gimp,” and “Krita,” all available as a free download. All of these are compatible with a Wacom tablet, though setting up Gimp looks tricky.

Your Video on Amazon Prime

If you’ve always wanted to be a movie producer, here’s your chance. A company called “3Roads” will make your production available on Amazon Prime. And they won’t charge for it.

We looked at several homemade videos that ended up as choices for Amazon Prime users. One was strictly for train buffs, but there are plenty of those. Another covered Civil War battle reenactments. A third called “Dinner for Hire with Chef Bernard,” takes you into a house party to see how a professional chef prepares party food. A fourth, “Chasing Taste,” is about a desperate novelist who becomes a food critic. Another, “Heart Child” is about teaching autistic children to ride a skateboard.

To get your video on Amazon, go to 3Roads.com and click “services.” Then click on “Amazon Prime distribution,” which is on the left side of the screen. There’s no charge for having it distributed, and you can even make money based on the number of minutes your video is viewed. If you do make money with your video, the distributor, 3Roads, gets 30 percent.

Facebook Tip

Joy’s friend Margie sometimes complains about all the notifications she gets from a woman’s club Facebook page. But she doesn’t have to put up with that, and neither do you.

If one of the Facebook groups you belong to is annoying, click “Groups,” (on the left side of the Facebook page on your computer), then click the tiny picture of a gear and “edit notifications.” You can turn them all off, be notified when your friends post, or get the highlights. Or click “leave group.”

Maybe you’re not part of any group but would like to be. On your phone, tap the three stacked lines and then click “Groups.”. Then tap “discover” and look at the various categories, such as “games,” “trending,” “funny,” “movies and TV,” “sports,” “local,” “travel,” and “parenting.” On your computer, click “Groups” off to the left of the home page, when you get there, click “Discover.” When you find one you like, click “join.” We just joined “Science Humor,” which has almost half a million members. Hopefully, they’re laughing.

App Happy

“The Trading Game” is a free app for Android and iPhones. It starts off teaching you about “Forex” or foreign exchange trading. Answer three questions right and you have $750 in play money to try trading it virtually. But they won’t let you spend it, even virtually, until you’ve taken more quizzes or read more about trading on their site. Maybe you’re the next George Soros.

“Microsoft News” is a rival to Google News and others. Worth checking out if you’re a news-aholic. Bob likes to wait a year or two for any news to develop its full flavor.

The Numbers Report

Fake news has changed the way people interact with Facebook. According to a Reuters report, they no longer trust it for news of the world.

Worldwide, over half of participants in a research study said they were concerned about fake news. The highest concern is in Brazil, Spain and the United States. In Brazil, 85 percent of people are concerned, in Spain, 69 percent and the United States, 64 percent. It is lowest in Germany (37 percent) and the Netherlands (30 percent) where recent elections were largely untroubled by concerns over fake content.
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(This week's column) Brush Up

It’s a brave new world for dental patients: There’s a financial incentive to brush.

We just earned 226 “Dentacoins,” a form of crypto currency, from brushing three times. We looked up their value and at the time of writing, they were worth eight cents. There are a dozen exchanges where we could sell our e-cash to get our eight cents, but the Dentacoin app says we must wait until we’ve accumulated more. Nuts. The brief spike in January when that amount of Dentacoin would have been worth $1.30 is gone, fell into a cavity. Perhaps it will rise again.

“Dentacare Health Training” is a free app for Android or iPhone. It aims to make you a better brusher and flosser by guiding you through a timed session. For each session, you earn a small amount of a crypto currency called “Dentacoin.”

The fun part is the music and the motivation. The app often calls us “Darling,” or “Sunshine.” It praises us when we’ve brushed, flossed and rinsed. However, set-up is not for the non-techy. If you want to sell your Dentacoin, you must first have an “Ethereum wallet,” and give the app that address. Addresses are OK to share because they’re only for receiving money. We set up our Ethereum account on Coinbase.com. It only takes $2 worth of Ethereum to get a wallet address.

The idea behind Dentacoin is to give patients an incentive to keep their mouths healthy, and to make it easier to do business across borders. So far, 38 dental clinics in 14 countries are using it. The app itself has 23,000 users so far.

No Rabbit From Magic Jack

We still like a landline and we read recently that 40 percent of phone owners do as well. The fact is, handsets are more comfortable and easier to handle than cell phones and they have a big number dial-pad and a louder speaker phone. We were Vonage customers for years, which gave us a relatively cheap Wi-Fi phone service that works with a landline. Then we switched to Magic Jack.

Why did we do this? It’s cheap (and so are we). Magic Jack is only $39 a year. But our phone was dead about 90 percent of the time whenever we wanted to call out. So we switched back to Vonage and were assured that we could have our old number back. After all, we’d had that number with Vonage for eight years.

Then came the bad news. Magic Jack said that if we canceled, we’d lose that number. So now we have four numbers: Two cell phone numbers, our old land line number that transfers automatically to a cell phone, and a new phone number from Vonage. This gives telemarketers four times as many chances to reach us with their urgent messages. They usually start with “This is a recorded line.” Who cares? Record all you want; the only thing you’re going to get is a click when we hang up. However, four lines means two payments, $39 a year for Magic Jack and about $22 a month for Vonage. Egads, as the bard might say.

Truth Machine

With a leery eye, Joy turned to a new book on crypto currency, having lost a little money in Bitcoin. Even so, she believes that some form of “e cash” will someday take off. It’s certainly very popular in science fiction stories.

“The Truth Machine,” by Casey and Vigna, tells you why it’s gotta happen, though Bob remains skeptical. It’s his job. Michael Casey works at M.I. T. and Paul Vigna is a Wall Street Journal reporter. Their central point is that a digital payments system allows you to cut out the intermediary and make records un-hackable. This is crucial in countries where corruption is common. It can also establish property rights where there are none, making it possible for people to get loans on their land. It can speed up settlements between buyers and sellers all over the globe, and open new markets like the market for your personal data, something offered already by a company called Datum.org. The Netherlands, more than any other country we’ve read about, seems to be forging ahead as crypto currency pioneers. That’s because they often go Dutch. (Sorry about that.)

For instance, there’s a “Virtual Power Plant Project” in Amsterdam. The battery packs owned by homeowners are connected to microgrids that keep everyone topped up; there’s no need for a power company. Every transaction is encrypted and secured by the “blockchain,” a continuous digital ledger.

We came across “The Truth Machine” because the head of Sotheby’s, the auction house, said that a smart millennial recommended it to him. It has more technical detail than we’d like but makes some interesting points. The authors say that what makes the blockchain so revolutionary is the invention of “triple-entry bookkeeping.” You take the double-entry system which made the Renaissance so profitable and add a third component, an open ledger secured by code. It involves a signed receipt for every transaction and a time and date stamp. It is an excellent way to ward off fraud.

Bob’s youngest son is helping to market a new kind of Bitcoin called “Bitcoin Core.” Joy gave him her Bitcoins to convert into this new version. It’s supposed to be faster. Bob likes going to the track.

Profit From Your Data
Every day comes a new story about Facebook, Google or someone else profiting from your data. How about you profiting from it?

We just installed “Datum,” a free app for Android, iPhone and computers, from Datum.org. It lets you sell your own info. First, we gave advertisers the right to send us one email per month, then we allowed our background location data to be collected for a month. Heck, if we go to Timbuktu, we don’t care who knows it. (Bob has already been to Timbuktu, says it’s sandy.)

Our email could be worth up to 100 “DAT” (another cryptocurrency) per month, according to the app. At of today’s writing, that’s $1.67, which puts us in our place. We tried out their data calculator, at calc.datum.org, and found out that our data is worth about $2,000 to companies. That’s quite a spread between their price and ours.

The Numbers Report
According to Decluttr.com, nearly half of single women view the owner of an old phone as an immediate turn-off. Also from Decluttr: Most iPhone users are turned off by Android users, and only half of Android users are inclined to date an iPhone user. (Well, naturally.) Android users tend to agree with the statement: “iPhones are overpriced and fragile, and if my date had one, I can assume that they might make poor purchasing decisions.”

Where etiquette comes into play, iPhone users are more likely to cancel at the last minute or end a relationship by text. iPhone users are also more likely to fake a bathroom trip to use their phone, text a friend, and complain about their date. iPhone users are also more likely to text friends in the middle of a date to find ways to excuse themselves when it’s not going well. As Bugs Bunny would sometimes say: “You know of course that this means war.”
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(this week's column) Cutting the Cable Revisited

We asked AT&T how much it would cost to drop our TV service and just keep the Internet. They immediately offered to drop the monthly charge to $120 from $160. That’s better, we thought, but hardly the best.

“Philo TV” has over 45 channels for $16 a month. These include A&E, Discovery, AMC, BBC America, Food Network, History, Travel, Lifetime, Food Network and Nickelodeon. You can watch them on your computer or your phone. Or, if you want to watch on a regular TV, you can plug in a Roku stick or player, Apple TV, or an Amazon Fire stick. Roku and Amazon Fire are fairly cheap, $28 for Roku Express and $40 for the Fire stick.

Though Philo doesn’t have local channels, you could get those by buying an indoor antenna for around $30. You can try out Philo for free at Try.Philo.com. The nice thing is, they don’t ask for a credit card, just a cell phone number.

Another option is AT&T’s “Watch TV,” free for subscribers to AT&T’s unlimited cell phone service, which starts at $80 a month. It offers 31 live channels, around 15,000 shows and movies on demand and an option to view anything that’s been on in the last 72 hours. The word is they’re going to offer this service “soon” to non-subscribers at $15 a month. We aren’t holding our breath; “soon” is one of those magic words, always changing shape.

Better Searches
Joy argues that the best way to find anything on Google is to type it exactly as you want it understood. Bob says there are some tricks of the trade worth knowing. For example:

Put in a dash or minus sign to exclude something. Say you’re looking for a history topic but are tired of articles from Wikipedia. Type into the Google search bar: “Teddy Roosevelt –Wikipedia,” without adding the quotes. Use the minus sign on your keyboard. (Note: Put a space to the left of the minus sign but not to the right.) We typed “CNN.com -politics” and got celebrity and business news. All right, it’s not a big timesaver, but at least it narrows things down.

Type “related:” (without the quotes) to find websites similar to ones you like. We typed “related:ZMEscience.com” and found FuturePundit and ScienceBlog. Don’t forget the dot com part or you’ll get a different result. We typed “related:boardgames.com” for a lot of board game websites. Who knew there were so many board games?

Use “vs” when you want to compare foods or anything else. For example, “rye vs wheat” will bring up a comparison. Bob likes rye.

You can also search within a site, which is often better than a site’s own search bar. Just type the site’s name, add a space, and then the search term. For instance: “Burpee.com indoor plants.”

Google Pay

You can often use Google Pay, formerly “Android Pay,” just by waving your phone at the terminal you see at the check-out counter in the grocery store and other places, though our local CVS wasn’t set up for it. There’s also something called “Google Pay Send,” which lets you send money. Now the two apps are merging.

In Google Pay, tap the hamburger icon (three stacked lines in the upper left corner of your phone screen) and choose “send or request money.” (You can also use Google Pay on your computer.) There’s a 2.9 percent fee if you use a credit card, but it’s free if you use a debit card. Google Pay and Apple Wallet let you store airline boarding passes, concert tickets, loyalty cards, gift cards and so on. In Google Pay, if you want your friends to pay their fair share, just click on the transaction and then split it up. Other ways to do this are through Venmo or Apple Pay.

Internuts

“Everything you ever needed to know about investing scribbled on cocktail napkins.” Search on that phrase to find an article from MarketWatch.com, with cartoons on napkins. The cartoons cover stocks, bonds, real estate and even Bitcoin.

“Norfolk PD Lip Sync Challenge.” Google that phrase to find a hip dance routine by police and firemen in Norfolk, Virginia. Frankly, they look great; if you’re gonna get a traffic ticket, you definitely want to get it in Norfolk.
App Happy

MobCrush.com is a place to watch others play video games live. Who would want to do that? So far, 670 million people.

Want an easy way to share your own game playing and possibly earn money through ads? Mobcrush added an app called “MobCam.” It will let you share your game playing on lots of social platforms at once, including YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, Twitter and others. The app also lets you chat with anyone watching. If you get ad sponsors, you can earn $15 an hour on up. Keep on shooting.

You’ll find MobCam for free in the Apple App Store and a free version for Android is expected out later this summer.

The Numbers Report

Here’s what’s hot in the freelance job market: According to the latest report from Freelancer.com, it’s data mining, networking technology, web design, and writing. (Bob has noticed that everyone thinks they write well and can sing grand opera. They are mistaken.)

Not hot are jobs related to e-books, Google Plus, Microsoft and app design. According to a study by The Nielsen Company, kids and adults are turning to traditional books, not e-books. With over 2.8 million Android apps and 2.2 million Apple apps, many are questioning the need for more, so that demand is way down. Jobs related to blockchain technology were up 58 percent in the first quarter of this year.
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