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Melissa J. Mallonee
Works at CSSD11
Attended University of Colorado at Boulder
Lives in Fountain, Colorado
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Melissa J. Mallonee

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Solar Eclipse Over the South Pacific Ocean - NASA
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Melissa J. Mallonee

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If you cast your eyes toward the constellation Cygnus, you’ll be looking in the direction of the largest planet yet discovered around a double-star system. It’s too faint to see with the naked eye, but a team led by astronomers from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and San Diego State University (SDSU) in California, used NASA's Kepler Space Telescope to identify the new planet, Kepler-1647b.
If you cast your eyes toward the constellation Cygnus, you’ll be looking in the direction of the largest planet yet discovered around a double-star system. It’s too faint to see with the naked eye, but a team led by astronomers from Goddard and San Diego State University, used NASA's Kepler Space Telescope to identify the new planet.
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The time to stop new offshore oil and gas drilling in the Arctic, Atlantic, and the Gulf of Mexico is right now. Take action today to protect our climate, our coasts, and our communities.
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Melissa J. Mallonee

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Win the lottery, but continue working because of boredom? Here are 50 things better than a cubicle.
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On the idyllic seaside campus of UC Santa Barbara, a garden grows.
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Melissa J. Mallonee

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French Revolutionaries Storm the Bastille on 14 July 1789

Parisian revolutionaries and mutinous troops storm and dismantle the Bastille, a royal fortress that had come to symbolize the tyranny of the Bourbon monarchs. This dramatic action signaled the beginning of the French Revolution, a decade of political turmoil and terror in which King Louis XVI was overthrown and tens of thousands of people, including the king and his wife Marie Antoinette, were executed.

The Bastille was originally constructed in 1370 as a bastide, or “fortification,” to protect the walled city of Paris from English attack. It was later made into an independent stronghold, and its name–bastide–was corrupted to Bastille. The Bastille was first used as a state prison in the 17th century, and its cells were reserved for upper-class felons, political troublemakers, and spies. Most prisoners there were imprisoned without a trial under direct orders of the king. Standing 100 feet tall and surrounded by a moat more than 80 feet wide, the Bastille was an imposing structure in the Parisian landscape.

By the summer of 1789, France was moving quickly toward revolution. There were severe food shortages in France that year, and popular resentment against the rule of King Louis XVI was turning to fury. In June, the Third Estate, which represented commoners and the lower clergy, declared itself the National Assembly and called for the drafting of a constitution. Initially seeming to yield, Louis legalized the National Assembly but then surrounded Paris with troops and dismissed Jacques Necker, a popular minister of state who had supported reforms. In response, mobs began rioting in Paris at the instigation of revolutionary leaders.

Bernard-René Jordan de Launay, the military governor of the Bastille, feared that his fortress would be a target for the revolutionaries and so requested reinforcements. A company of Swiss mercenary soldiers arrived on July 7 to bolster his garrison of 82 soldiers. The Marquis de Sade, one of the few prisoners in the Bastille at the time, was transferred to an insane asylum after he attempted to incite a crowd outside his window by yelling: “They are massacring the prisoners; you must come and free them.” On July 12, royal authorities transferred 250 barrels of gunpowder to the Bastille from the Paris Arsenal, which was more vulnerable to attack. Launay brought his men into the Bastille and raised its two drawbridges.

On July 13, revolutionaries with muskets began firing at soldiers standing guard on the Bastille’s towers and then took cover in the Bastille’s courtyard when Launay’s men fired back. That evening, mobs stormed the Paris Arsenal and another armory and acquired thousands of muskets. At dawn on July 14, a great crowd armed with muskets, swords, and various makeshift weapons began to gather around the Bastille.

Launay received a delegation of revolutionary leaders but refused to surrender the fortress and its munitions as they requested. He later received a second delegation and promised he would not open fire on the crowd. To convince the revolutionaries, he showed them that his cannons were not loaded. Instead of calming the agitated crowd, news of the unloaded cannons emboldened a group of men to climb over the outer wall of the courtyard and lower a drawbridge. Three hundred revolutionaries rushed in, and Launay’s men took up a defensive position. When the mob outside began trying to lower the second drawbridge, Launay ordered his men to open fire. One hundred rioters were killed or wounded.

Launay’s men were able to hold the mob back, but more and more Parisians were converging on the Bastille. Around 3 p.m., a company of deserters from the French army arrived. The soldiers, hidden by smoke from fires set by the mob, dragged five cannons into the courtyard and aimed them at the Bastille. Launay raised a white flag of surrender over the fortress. Launay and his men were taken into custody, the gunpowder and cannons were seized, and the seven prisoners of the Bastille were freed. Upon arriving at the Hotel de Ville, where Launay was to be arrested by a revolutionary council, the governor was pulled away from his escort by a mob and murdered.

The capture of the Bastille symbolized the end of the ancien regime and provided the French revolutionary cause with an irresistible momentum. Joined by four-fifths of the French army, the revolutionaries seized control of Paris and then the French countryside, forcing King Louis XVI to accept a constitutional government. In 1792, the monarchy was abolished and Louis and his wife Marie-Antoinette were sent to the guillotine for treason in 1793.

By order of the new revolutionary government, the Bastille was torn down. On February 6, 1790, the last stone of the hated prison-fortress was presented to the National Assembly. Today, July 14–Bastille Day–is celebrated as a national holiday in France.

#frenchrevolution   #bastilleday   #louisxvi   #marieantoinette   #paris   #monarchy   #anarchy   #prison   #riot   #revolt   #revolution   #france  

via/ history.com

image | bookshopsdriveinsandjive.com
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Melissa J. Mallonee

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In day 3 of a lifestyle change again and all I'm thinking about is 27 reasons not to work out.
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Matt Gehrung!
I think we should have to start all nostalgia stories with the words "in my day" and when you read it, you should shake your fist. I find a lot of nostalgi
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Melissa J. Mallonee

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Even China is trying to convince people to eat less red meat.
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Melissa J. Mallonee

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I might be a little out of touch, but I'm a girl who went up a hill and hasn't coasted down the other side yet.
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People
In her circles
149 people
Have her in circles
72 people
Marina Loeper's profile photo
dumiter vlad's profile photo
Michael Smolensky's profile photo
Melvin Ramos's profile photo
Meryl Danielle's profile photo
brayan samaniego's profile photo
John Mallonee's profile photo
Levi Mallonee's profile photo
Mike Verderaime's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Teacher
Skills
Je parle français...and I'm good at lots of stuff...just can't think of anything right now.
Employment
  • CSSD11
    Teacher, 2002 - present
    French Instructor
  • Hot Topic
    2002
  • Bombay Company
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Fountain, Colorado
Previously
Colorado Springs, Colorado - Fort Collins, Denver, & Boulder, CO
Links
Story
Tagline
"I am endlessly falling, lost in this wonderful misery..."
Introduction

I went to Wasson High School in Colorado Springs and the University of Colorado at Boulder.  :)I have five children and three dogs and I teach high school!

Bragging rights
Je parle français!
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Education
  • University of Colorado at Boulder
  • University of Colorado at Denver
  • Colorado State University
  • Wasson High School
Basic Information
Gender
Female
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Married
Other names
Gehrung
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Angry Birds Under Pigstruction
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
We were greeted as soon as we entered the show room! Kristine was friendly and helpful. The SUV we wanted wasn't on the lot yet, but she showed us what it would look like inside and what the color would look like outside. Kristine called us when the vehicle arrived and both of us were able to take a test drive. She was very helpful during the negotiation process, bringing her manager in to talk directly to us and also made sure that once we purchased the SUV that we were familiar with all the functions. Kristine even helped pair my phone to the Bluetooth! I would buy another vehicle from her!
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
2 reviews
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