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Wayne Radinsky
18,621 followers -
Software Design Engineer
Software Design Engineer

18,621 followers
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"Roscosmos plans to carry out 150 space launches by 2025," says CEO Igor Komarov.

"In the period ending 2025 (the period of the newly-adopted federal space program) we plan to fundamentally upgrade the group of satellites in orbit. We plan to carry out more than 150 launches. That done the Russian orbital group will grow considerably."

The "group of satellites in orbit" includes Russia's version of the GPS system, GLONASS.
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"How to do machine learning efficiently." A set of practical tips for machine learning projects. "I now believe that there is an art, or craftsmanship, to structuring machine learning work and none of the math heavy books I tended to binge on seem to mention this."

"The 10 second rule." "Be a time spammer." "Test yourself." "Rush to success." "Don't tune the parameters, tune the architecture."
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Honda still uses humans to build the Accord at its Marysville, Ohio, factory, "and that's unlikely to change anytime soon."

"Even as doom-and-gloom reports suggest robots are poised to replace human labor and automotive upstarts like Tesla Inc. aim to largely remove people from the production line, workers keep toiling side-by-side with machines in Marysville. And Honda's approach is working: The Accord won the prestigious North American Car of Year award at last week's Detroit auto show."

"Japanese rival Toyota Motor Corp. uses just a handful of robots on the Camry final assembly line at its plant in Georgetown, Kentucky, and has no plans to add more, according to Mark Boire, chief production engineer. Markus Schaefer, production chief at Mercedes-Benz, in 2016 said the carmaker was de-automating and relying more on humans to install the endless array of options that luxury customers demand."
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In the Malay Peninsula, researchers compared the vocabulary for smells of the Semaq Beri, who are hunter-gatherers, and the Semelai, who are horticulturalists. "Asifa Majid of Radboud University in the Netherlands and Nicole Kruspe of Sweden's Lund University asked 20 Semaq Beri and 21 Semelai individuals to identify 80 colors and 16 smells -- including banana, petrol, fish and leather. To reflect the consistency of the responses, the researchers created a 'codability score.' If all members of a group gave a different description of a scent or color, the score would be zero; if they all gave the same response, the score would be one."

"Semelai farmers' average codability score for scents was only 0.06. But the Semelai were much more consistent when it came to naming colors, earning a score of 0.46. The Semaq Beri hunter-gatherers scored 0.3 in the color portion of the experiment, but far outpaced the Semelai when it came to naming scents, racking up a score of 0.26."
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Robots that work out. Kengoro and Kenshiro at the University of Tokyo. They mimic the human musculoskeletal system.
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The Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology "published the Three-Year Action Plan to Encourage the Industrial Development of the New Generation of AI."

"The Action Plan identifies the key areas of AI development between 2018 and 2020, which include intelligent vehicles, service robots, drones, medical image aided diagnosis systems, video and image identification systems, voice interaction systems, translation systems, smart home products, intelligent sensors, neural network chips, and open source platforms. In each area, the key technologies and applications involved are also specified."

"AI development is considered as a critical catalyst of the 'Made in China 2025' initiative."
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"Mathematicians classify partial differential equations like Navier-Stokes based on the extent to which they can go haywire at infinitesimally small scales. Navier-Stokes is on the extreme end of the spectrum. The difficulty of the mathematics of the equation is, in some sense, an exact reflection of the complexity of the turbulent flows they're supposed to be able to describe."

"Researchers want to understand exactly how a smooth flow breaks down into a turbulent flow and to model the future shape of a fluid once turbulence has taken over. But the Millennium Prize asks for something much more modest: proving that solutions will always exist."

"Tristan Buckmaster and Vlad Vicol's work shows that when you allow solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations to be very rough (like a sketch rather than a photograph), the equations start to output nonsense."
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"The AI Index, from Stanford, adopts a unique approach, and tries to aggregate data across many regimes. It contains Volume of Activity metrics, which measure things like venture capital investment, attendance at academic conferences, published papers, and so on. The results are what you might expect: tenfold increases in academic activity since 1996, an explosive growth in startups focused around AI, and corresponding venture capital investment. The issue with this metric is that it measures AI hype as much as AI progress. The two might be correlated, but then again, they may not."
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"Amazon's first Amazon Go, a kind of grocery store without cashiers or a checkout line, will open to the public in Seattle on Monday in the first stage of an experiment that could usher in a new era of shopping."

"Go uses a network of cameras and sensors to dynamically monitor customers and automatically bill them for what they take out of the store via a smartphone app. It's been in a form of beta testing for some time, but starting tomorrow, any customer will be able to just walk right in if they download and install the Amazon Go app. When we last saw this tech tested out in early 2017, Amazon was reportedly still working on some bugs -- like the computers that run the store wigging out if too many customers entered the building, or they moved too fast inside the building, or if retail items got moved around on the shelves."
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"Self-crashing cars." "Cars are computers." "After a cyber security breach at very reputable company I was working with years ago I asked myself: If even we can't keep personal data secure, how are these automotive companies doing it? Then Jeep got hacked and had to ship millions of USB sticks to patch the automotive software."

"Vaguely vindicated that there wasn't some special secret to securing computers that they knew that we didn't, I also felt uneasy. If hacking a Jeep is as straightforward as hacking a server, and servers are routinely breached, then where are all the hacked cars? It's a bit like the Fermi Paradox."

"The explanation is likely a mix of things. It may not occur to most security researchers that they could be just as effective hacking cars as they could hacking servers or workstations. There may be a lack of motivation by assailants capable of breaching these devices, since they may be used to corporate espionage contracts where buyers buy information, not control. They may also have trouble turning security techniques that work for servers or personal computers to cars because the attack surface is smaller."

"Most software developers haven't thought of self driving cars, cyber security, and national security at the same time, nor do they know the interfaces that the communication systems on automotives expose. When I bring up the nature of this threat to strangers with data science stickers on their laptops while pretending to be a layperson, they assure me that things are fine because there must be regulation."

"Devices could be designed to accept multiple modules any of which can initiate safety procedures." "The safety module must be able to communicate through multiple channels; including satellite, radio, and LTE." "It should be assumed that the module may be relaying commands to a compromised control computer, so the module itself must be able to disengage both the power and the controlling computer during an emergency." "The most straightforward way of securing the safety module would be to employ both a secured computer within the safety module and a fallback to an unchangeable ASIC, each with their own set of cryptographic keys." "Safety modules should have no ports and no network connection to debugging devices or upgrade servers." "Standardized, redundant systems are another safeguard." "Isolating the control computer of our autonomous devices is also important." "Do not allow control computers to read data directly from the CAN bus." "Some of these proposals, like the previous one, will make repairs by small shops hard or impossible." "Our designs should take a note from Apple's Secure Enclave and mandate that critical tasks, like updating the control computer's software, be accomplished in a similar way." "The network shouldn't be trusted and DNS and certificate chains shouldn't either." "The media computer and its components should be completely isolated from any components involved in navigation or control." "The DSRC should be similarly redesigned and isolated." "Use HTTPS/2 with TLS 1.2 or greater and ensure ciphers and configurations employ forward secrecy." "Use client side encryption in addition to HTTPS and use really big keys." "Ship every car with its own, massive One Time Pad (OTP)." "Never SSH or otherwise allow access via programmer terminal to any autonomous vehicle carrying passengers or those outside of secure testing facilities." "Employ cryptographic signing and encryption on everything that is possible, given performance and safety considerations." "All code on any device connected to the control or navigation computer should have a high degree of test coverage, and these tests and other techniques, like fuzzing, should be run before any software update to any component." "Bug bounties, like those employed by GM, Tesla, and others are a good start, but they do not pay well enough to fund non-casual security research.Government mandated and internationally agreed upon rewards should be set and payments should scale with the number of autonomous devices in operation." "Harshly fine and imprison those that manufacture, sell, or provision counterfeit automotive electronics." "Dramatically increase funding for COMSEC and cyber operations." "Fund research into chips that are specialized for security so vulnerabilities like Meltdown and Spectre are less likely." "Build systems to detect reverse engineering of security critical code and collaborate with intelligence agencies to filter friendly security researchers from potential hostiles or cyberarms manufacturers."
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