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FIXING THE FUTURE 2014
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With his recent book from Urbanomic, Object Oriented Philosophy: The Noumenon’s New Clothes, philosopher Peter Wolfendale examines trends in continental philosophy which seek to overturn a correlationist consensus, and directly access a metaphysical realism once more. Wolfendale engages a broad-ranging knowledge of the history Western philosophical thought, from Deleuze to Quine, to examine and critique this turn, arguing for the priority of a methodological epistemology if we are to have any hope of recovering a metaphysical stance worth advocating. Following Kant, Wolfendale’s Transcendental Realism proceeds from a fundamental deontology to revive the constructive trajectory of truth in the formal structure of the real, rationally and systematically engaging both the demands of thought and the world upon philosophy.

In this seminar Peter Wolfendale will present his approach to conducting metaphysics in the the 21st century, providing an overview of what we can recover from the development of philosophy and where we can go in the future. Responding to Wolfendale’s presentation will be artist/theorist Amanda Beech, philosopher Daniel Sacilotto, and philosopher Ben Woodard. Moderated by artist and writer Joshua Johnson.

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Organized by Diann Bauer 

In this session Ray Brassier, Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams will talk about the overlap between their philosophical and political concerns despite their differences in disciplinary focus. The aim of the conversation will be to address the interfusions of philosophical rationalism and a 21st century political economy. The discussion will be moderated by Diann Bauer, followed by questions and comments by the other organizers of the Fixing the Future platform in addition to those watching live. This session will not be archived as a video but will be transcribed and posted on our website at a later date

http://fixingthefuture.info/projects/events/plotting-politics-reason-and-political-economy/

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Organized by Mohammad Salemy

Streaming online and live @ 
Whitebox Art Center
329 Broome Street
New York, NY 10002

An uncanny timeliness opened an unexpected connection between global contemporary art and geopolitics this month when, following the escalation of Israel’s military operations in Gaza, a planned exhibition of works from and about the Arab world opened at New York’s New Museum. Not only is the exhibition the biggest of its kind but, in addition to works from Palestinian artists throughout the show, the fifth floor of the museum houses a separately curated presentation of art and archival materials about and from Palestine.

It’s merely a truism to respond to this happenstance with the well-known quote by Walter Benjamin, that “there is no document of civilization which is not at the same time a document of barbarism.” However, investigating the subtleties of Benjamin’s link between civilization and barbarism seems especially pertinent to these coincidental exposures of the politics of the Arab world in that the operating logics of both Israel’s Operation Protective Edge and New Museum’s Here and Elsewhere each in their own way contend with the form and content of the anticolonial resistance that has historically provided the Raison d’être for so much of Arab art, specifically contemporary art from Palestine.

In this conversation organized by Mohammad Salemy, Arialla Azoulley, Joseph Audeh, Judith Rodenbeck, Alex Shams, and Myriam Vanneschi will discuss what connections can be made between seemingly unrelated categories of military and museum as well as war and art.

The Middle East continues to be a primary site for the blood-drenched transformations of our planetary geopolitical system and is now also taking a leading role in the emergence of a global contemporary art. The discussion will consider whether the coincidental exposure of geopolitical violence in the Middle East and art from the region to audiences in the global north can help us understand the future of Palestine and the place of production and distribution of contemporary art in the future.

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If a guiding question in developing Fixing the Future’s platform has been “how to act according to the 21st century?”, it has been motivated by a recognition that what inhibits such action is the mediation of our present by abstract powers embedded within capitalism that also manipulate and control futures. While a primary concern for us is the reorientation of art away from such mediations as they operate through the staged indeterminations of contemporary art, the conditions of the contemporary might themselves be figured as a site of confinement or series of traps whose generic reiteration of illusionary autonomies, false affordances, and liberal freedoms carries consequences for any domain of thought and action. 


In this seminar, strategist Benedict Singleton will present alongside two of Fixing the Future’s organizers, Suhail Malik and Keith Tilford, to consider what methods, strategies, tactics, and logics might be adequate to the task of defeating the very logics that structurally determine our present and the imperative to take leave of contemporary conditions.

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