Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Trooper Veterinary Hospital
12 followers
12 followers
About
Posts

Nuts for your dog? The answer is simply no. Want to know more? Check out this helpful article on the types of nuts that are the greatest risk for your dog.

http://www.petinsurance.com/healthzone/pet-articles/pet-health-toxins/Nut-Dangers-to-Dogs.aspx
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Dog Food Recall - Blue Buffalo is voluntarily recalling a limited batch of its Life Protection Formula Dog Food product due to the presence of excessive moisture and mold. Check out our blog for more information.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Canine Influenza...is your dog at risk? You might be surprised to find out that he is! Check out our blog for more information about the new strain of canine influenza and the vaccine available at Trooper Vet!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Catch ya later, Trooper Vet!
-Sheba
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Spring has sprung!  That being said, do your cats chew on plants in your home?  Because they love to climb and explore, it is difficult to keep plants out of their reach. Therefore, if you are going to have plants in your house, or if you let your cat out in your yard, you need to be able to accurately identify the poisonous plants to which your cat will be exposed. When in doubt it is best to remove the plant from your home.

If a plant is poisonous, assume all parts of the plant are poisonous -- though some parts of the plant may have higher concentrations of the toxin than others. Many toxic plants are irritants: they cause inflammation of the skin, mouth, stomach, etc. The toxin in other plants may only affect a particular organ like the kidney or heart.

The following is a listing of plants that are toxic to cats, as well as the most commonly encountered toxic plants:
Amaryllis (Amaryllis sp.)
Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale)
Azaleas and Rhododendrons (Rhododendron sp.)
Castor Bean (Ricinus communis)
Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.)
Cyclamen (Cyclamen sp.)
English Ivy (Hedera helix)
Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe sp.)
Lilies (Lilium sp.)
Marijuana (Cannabis sativa)
Oleander (Nerium oleander)
Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum sp.)
Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)
Spanish thyme (Coleus ampoinicus)
Tulip and Narcissus bulbs (Tulipa and Narcissus sp.)
Yew (Taxus sp.)
To read more, go to: www.petmd.com/cat/emergency/poisoning-toxicity/e_ct_poisonous_plants
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Trooper Veterinary Hospital was proud to participate in The American Cancer Society's Bark For Life this past Saturday, April 16, 2016. The Bark for Life is an annual fundraising event honoring the life-long contributions of our Canine Caregivers. This event provides an opportunity for people to be empowered through their canine companion partnerships and to contribute to cancer cures through the mission of the American Cancer Society.

Canine Caregivers are Canine Companions, Guide Dogs, Service Dogs, Rescue Dogs, Therapy Dogs, Police Dogs, Cancer Survivor Dogs, and Diagnostic Dogs, who with their owners, join the American Cancer Society as Relay teams. They participate to celebrate cancer survivorship, to honor people lost to cancer, and to fundraise in support of the American Cancer Society mission of eliminating cancer though research, education, advocacy and service.

Trooper Vet staff and Ambassadog Louie manned a vendor table (check Louie out in the photo above!) and met many folks during this great event! We were proud to be named the top donor team, raising $545 to fund the fight against cancer. All of the canine teams came together to raise over $2200! We are thrilled that we could give back to the community and help raise money to battle a disease that has touched us all in some way.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Who has your heart?  A cat?  A dog?  A chinchilla?  Fishes?  Some of each?? For National Pet Day, share a picture of your pet below! 

Louie and Ralph, Trooper Vet's Ambassadog and Ambassacat, belong to Dr. Herman.  They have his heart for sure!

http://goo.gl/tTyXMI
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Happy Heartworm Awareness Month!

Do you know the dangers your pet faces from heartworms? The American Heartworm Society has all of the information you need to know about this pesky parasite! Check it out here and be sure to have your dog tested annually for heartworm! Call us to schedule a heartworm test today!

https://goo.gl/cmqHKY
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Powassan Virus - Powassan (POW) virus is transmitted to humans by infected ticks. Approximately 60 cases of POW virus disease were reported in the United States over the past 10 years. Most cases have occurred in the Northeast and Great Lakes region. Signs and symptoms of infection can include fever, headache, vomiting, weakness, confusion, seizures, and memory loss. Long-term neurologic problems may occur. There is no specific treatment, but people with severe POW viru... http://ow.ly/2XD80e
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Canine Flu FAQ - Questions, Answers, and Interim Guidelines   Q: What is canine influenza? A: Canine influenza (CI), or dog flu, is a highly contagious respiratory infection of dogs that is caused by an influenza A virus. The canine influenza virus (CIV) is closely related to the virus that causes equine influenza and it is thought that the equine influenza virus mutated to produce the canine influenza virus. In the U.S., canine influenza has been caused by the H3N8 inf... http://ow.ly/2XuecF
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded