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A gene known to suppress tumor formation in a broad range of tissues plays a key role in keeping stem cells in muscles dormant until needed, a finding that may have implications for both human health and animal production, according to a Purdue University study headed by Purdue Center for Cancer Research member Dr. Shihuan Kuang.

http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2017/Q1/tumor-suppressor-key-in-maintaining-stem-cell-status-in-muscle.html
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Join us for our 2016 Holiday Fund Drive. Your valued support enables life for those battling #cancer!

http://www.cancerresearch.purdue.edu/2016-holiday-fund-drive
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A Purdue-related startup, co-founded by Purdue Center for Cancer Research member Dr. You-Yeon Won, is developing a unique nanoparticle ultraviolet radiation technology that could enhance cancer cell killing effects of radiation treatment, thus reducing radiation doses and patient side effects. #Purdue #Cancer #Cancerresearch #PurdueCure

http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2016/Q4/purdue-related-startup-develops-radiation-method-that-could-enhance-cancer-killing-effect-of-treatment,-reduce-side-effects.html
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At the Purdue Center for Cancer Research, we work to enable life through research.
Dr. Alex Wei, Professor of Organic Chemistry and Purdue Center for Cancer Research member, is looking into new insights for #nanoparticle delivery to #cancer tumor cells. #Purdue #cancerresearch #PurdueCure

http://bit.ly/1skNOJB
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A new type of imaging technology, developed by Purdue Center for Cancer Research member Dr. Ji-Xin Cheng and his lab, uses the mid-infrared part of the spectrum and "thermal lensing" to visualize living cells and organisms, an innovation that could bring insights into drug delivery and cancer treatment. #PurdueCure

http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2016/Q3/imaging-uses-photothermal-effect-to-peer-into-living-cells.html
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“The way that therapy is currently selected for cancer patients is almost a blind process. Because of that, most cancer patients don’t respond to their therapy,” says Dr. David Nolte, Purdue University Edward M. Purcell Distinguished Professor of Physics, and Purdue Center for Cancer research member. “I think we can drastically improve the selection of cancer therapy, and I think that’s going to have a lot of benefit for a lot of people.”

http://www.insideindianabusiness.com/story/32938301/technology-aims-to-find-best-chemo-for-individual-patients

#PurdueCure #cancerresearch #HammerDownCancer

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Purdue University Professor You-Yeon Won’s development, called radio-luminescent nanoparticles, is designed to enhance the cancer-cell-killing effects of radiation treatment.
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Purdue Center for Cancer Research member Dr. Andy Tao has developed a novel method for detecting certain types of proteins that serve as indicators for cancer and other diseases. “It is possible to use our platform to identify these sugar-modified proteins as a biomarker for bladder cancer,” Tao said. #Purdue #cancerresearch #cancer #PurdueCure
 
A Purdue University biochemist has developed a novel method for detecting certain types of proteins that serve as indicators for cancer and other diseases.

Glycoproteins are formed when sugars attach to and modify a protein. In some cases, a combination of glycoproteins present in a sample of blood or urine could be an indicator of disease or cancer.

But those glycoproteins can be elusive. There has been no antibody to differentiate between them and regular proteins. And the complex and bulky sugar groups can make it difficult for even standard protein-detection antibodies to find their targets.

W. Andy Tao, a Purdue professor of biochemistry, has developed a novel protein array, a high throughput platform to analyze multiple proteins in parallel, for separating glycoproteins from unmodified proteins. Tao also demonstrated its effectiveness for identifying glycoproteins associated with bladder cancer. The findings were published Monday (Nov. 14) in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Tao developed a nano-sized polymer, called polyGPA, that attaches to the sugar groups of glycoproteins and brings them to the surface of the protein array. The nanopolymer also repositions the glycoprotein so that the antibodies used to detect unmodified proteins can better reach their targets. http://bit.ly/2fwUc0z
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Exciting news! Imaging technology from Purdue Center for Cancer Research member, Dr. Phil Low, has been fast-tracked toward FDA approval!
 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted fast-track status to a Purdue University scientist's optical imaging technology that may one day significantly improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients.

Philip Low, Purdue's Ralph C. Corley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry in Purdue University - College of Science and the director of the Purdue Institute for Drug Discovery in Discovery Park at Purdue University, developed the OTL 38 molecule that will move quickly to phase 3 clinical trials in human cancer patients. The molecule, given to patients intravenously, attaches to receptors on cancer cells and glows, identifying the cells that should be surgically removed.

Low says up to 40 percent of cancers recur in the original site of the surgery because surgeons might miss a microscopic cluster of 10 or 20 cells that cannot be seen during a normal procedure. OTL 38 illuminates even those tiny clusters.

"This has the potential to save lives because the surgeons will tell you that the only sure way to cure cancer is to cut it all out," says Low, who is also a member of the Purdue Center for Cancer Research. "This technology gives them a significantly better chance to find and remove all the cancer from a patient." http://bit.ly/2e044hZ
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Dr. Humaira Gowher, a Purdue assistant professor of biochemistry and Purdue Center for Cancer Research member, is interested in the mechanisms that control gene expression by directing epigenetic regulators such as DNA methylation to specific portions of a gene. Her research has pinpointed an epigenetic mechanism that is a key factor in how genes are switched on and off. External or environmental factors, such as carcinogens from tobacco smoking, disrupt normal epigenetic regulation. This leads to changes in gene expression, which results in the production of cancerous cells. #Purdue #cancerresearch #PurdueCure

Read more at: http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2016/Q4/key-epigenetic-switch-mechanism-in-gene-regulation-discovered.html
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Purdue Center for Cancer Research Director and Distinguished Professor of Comparative Pathobiology, Dr. Tim Ratliff, spoke about the latest technology and drug discovery breakthroughs happening at Purdue, at the Big Ten Cancer Research Consortium Summit on September 10th in Indianapolis.
 
"Investigators and industry leaders collaborate at BTCRC Summit"

The first-ever Big Ten Cancer Research Consortium Summit drew an energetic group of academic investigators and pharmaceutical industry leaders to Indianapolis Sept. 9-10, for a series of meetings that strengthened academic and pharmaceutical industry collaboration within the consortium.

More than 100 attendees, representing all BTCRC member institutions and 16 pharmaceutical and biotech companies, attended the event, hosted by the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center.

Read more: 
Oct. 5, 2016: The first-ever Big Ten Cancer Research Consortium Summit drew an energetic group of academic investigators and pharmaceutical industry leaders to Indianapolis Sept. 9-10, for a series of meetings that strengthened academic and pharmaceutical industry collaboration within the ...
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Purdue Center for Cancer Research member, Dr. Andy Tao, received funding for his research technology that could lead to a new way to distinguish aggressive forms of prostate cancer from indolent forms of the disease, to ensure the best possible patient treatment.

http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2016/Q3/tymora-receives-225,000-grant-to-advance-prostate-cancer-research.html

#PurdueCure #ProstateCancer #CancerResearch #Purdue
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Pushpak Bhandari's profile photo
Pushpak Bhandari
8 months ago
Great research