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Montessori Discovery School
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Montessori, School, Homeschooling, Montessori method, creative learning
Montessori, School, Homeschooling, Montessori method, creative learning

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If you are looking for a yummy way to cool off this week check out the Sundae Drives brochure! Some of my personal favorites include Ekonk Hill Turkey Farm in Sterling, We-lik-it in Abington and also Buttonwood Farm in Griswold. Does your family have a favorite on the list?


http://www.mystic.org/icecreamtrail
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After a brief hiatus Friday's Fun Fact is back! 

Did you know that the llama is a South American relative of the camel? These sturdy creatures are domestic animals used by the peoples of the Andes Mountains. Native peoples have used llamas as pack animals for centuries. Llamas graze on grass and, like cows, regurgitate their food and chew it as cud. They chomp on such wads for some time before swallowing them for complete digestion. Llamas can survive by eating many different kinds of plants, and they need little water. 

At birth, a baby llama (called a cria) can weigh between 20 - 30 lbs. A full-grown, full-size llama is 5.5 to 6.0 ft tall at the top of the head, and can weigh between 280 to 450 lb. Llamas can live for about 20–30 years with good care. They are very social animals and live with other llamas as a herd. Llamas are intelligent and can learn simple tasks after a few repetitions. As of 2007, there were over seven million llamas and alpacas in South America, and due to importation from South America in the late 20th century, there are now over 158,000 llamas and 100,000 alpacas in the United States and Canada.

Our two beautiful llamas - Blayd and Dr. BeBop
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Happy Earth Day everyone!
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Friday's Fun Fact:

Did you know that if you were to add together all the droplets in a medium sized Cumulus cloud, they’d weigh the same as 80 elephants?

All clouds are made of water – tiny droplets of water in the 
case of the low clouds and ice crystals in the high clouds 
(mid-level clouds often contain a mixture of the two). 
There are ten basic types of cloud and they are grouped according to the way they look – whether they’re made up of individual clumps, or layers or streaks – and how high they are – whether low, mid-level or high clouds.

Cumulus clouds are the cotton wool puffs, with flat bases and cauliflower tops, which drift lazily across the sky on a sunny day. They generally form a few hours after daybreak and tend to scatter before sundown. They form on invisible columns of air (known as thermals) which rise from the ground as it is warmed by the Sun. Most forms of Cumulus produce no rain or snow, and so are known as fair-weather clouds.
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Visit our Open House Thursday evening April 10th, from 7:00 - 8:30 pm.  You'll meet our teachers and learn how Montessori education works.  Then you'll tour our classrooms and chat with our teachers.
Although we love children, this evening is designed for adults.
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