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Penny4NASA

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On this day in 1969, the crew of Apollo 11 splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, accomplishing President Kennedy’s goal of “landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth” before the end of the decade.

Tell Congress it’s time to take the next giant leap for mankind: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

#NASA #Apollo11 #Space #Science #OnThisDay #History
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Penny4NASA

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On this day 5 years ago, the final Space Shuttle mission returned to Earth. No astronaut has launched from U.S. soil since.

Tell Congress you support a return to U.S. manned spaceflight: https://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

#NASA #SpaceShuttle #Space #Science
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Matt Thompson's profile photoScott In Florida's profile photoRan dy's profile photo
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Ran dy
 
+Scott In Florida
If you realy care for the US then join the upheaval going on unhinging oligarchs united. Several states allready called for a convention to overturn unlimited $$ and end the POTUS auction for good.
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Penny4NASA

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On this day in 1969, Apollo 11 launched from Kennedy Space Center.

Forty-seven years later, Apollo 11 and the first ever moon landing persevere as testaments to human ingenuity and motivation. Using only a fraction of the computing power available at our fingertips today, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Michael Collins, and all those behind-the-scenes were able to extend humankind’s physical boundaries to the surface of another celestial body. Coupled with Armstrong’s iconic quote, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” Apollo 11 has since been cemented as not only NASA’s greatest contribution to modern exploration, but arguably humankind’s greatest explorative feat to date.

On this day in 1969, millions of people crowded around their television sets to watch what would become a seminal moment in human history - the launch of the first manned lunar mission. A Saturn V rocket launched Apollo 11 and its crew from Launch Complex 39 site at the Kennedy Space Center. In twelve minutes it would achieve geocentric orbit, and three days later it would achieve lunar orbit.

As this week marks the 47th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, we are poignantly reminded of an epoch of space exploration wherein manned exploration existed beyond the limits of low-Earth orbit. As we look back fondly on the first humans to have walked on the Moon, it’s important to remember that the first humans to step foot on Mars are walking the Earth today.

Write Congress today and tell them it’s time to take the next giant leap for mankind: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

Watch at Penny4NASA's video, the Spirit of Apollo, and consider what raising the NASA budget from less than half a penny up to one full penny on each federal dollar spent can and will do for our economy, for our society and for our future: http://goo.gl/kUDM7

Read more about Apollo 11:
http://goo.gl/fb8NQ
http://goo.gl/S2Hqg
http://goo.gl/3hXI3

Image Credit: NASA

#NASA #Apollo11 #NeilArmstrong #Space #Science #OnThisDay
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Qwerty Uiop's profile photoDan Reidy's profile photoAaron Harper's profile photoLuby Sanders's profile photo
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Rock on NASA, you continue making history, and we are very proud of all your accomplishments!! Thx NASA ;-)
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Penny4NASA

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On this day 5 years ago, the final Space Shuttle mission launched.

For thirty years, a generation of astronauts embarked on a wide range of dynamic missions utilizing the five shuttles that comprised the Space Transportation System (STS). As humanity’s first reusable spacecraft, these robust shuttles provided the means for two of NASA’s finest achievements – launching the Hubble Space Telescope and constructing the International Space Station. However, according to a space.com article, the space shuttle program has had significant cultural impacts as well.

“One of the greatest legacies of the space shuttle has been its ability to open space to more and different types of people,” stated Robert Pearlman, editor of collectSPACE.com. “Many nations saw their first citizen enter space aboard the shuttle, including Canada, Mexico, Japan, Australia, Saudi Arabia and Spain. The first American female and African-American entered space on the shuttle. The first American of Jewish descent and the oldest person to ever enter space flew on the shuttle, too.”

On July 8th, 2011, the launch of STS-135 proved historic, as it was the final flight of the Space Shuttle program, with Atlantis being the mode of transportation. Lasting 12 days, 18 hours, and 28 minutes, STS-135 was an ISS supply mission, with a spacewalk scheduled on the fifth day for ISS maintenance. After successfully completing their mission objectives, the crew prepared Atlantis for its 33rd – and final – reentry and landing procedure, which occurred on July 21st. By the end of this mission, Atlantis racked up some impressive stats. The shuttle orbited the Earth 4,848 times, and in doing so, traveled nearly 126 million miles – more than 525 times the distance from the Earth to the Moon. After three decades and 14 satellite deployments, Atlantis was the workhorse of the shuttle fleet. STS-135 CAPCOM operator Barry Wilmore recognized the importance of Atlantis’ final Florida landing.

“We congratulate you, Atlantis, as well as the thousands of passionate individuals across this great space faring nation who truly empowered this incredible spacecraft which has inspired millions around the globe.”

Since the completion of STS-135, NASA still remains unable to send Americans to space, and must rely upon the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmos, for passage to the ISS. Hoping that an American-based commercial alternative would be available by 2015 under the Commercial Crew Program (CCP), NASA had an original contract with Roscosmos at roughly $62.7 million per seat aboard a Soyuz spacecraft. However, because of the failure on Congress’ part to fully fund the CCP at the requested levels, that goal was made impossible.

Still requiring a means to transport Americans to and from the ISS, on April 30th, 2013, NASA was forced to extend that contract until 2017. This extension also comes at a price. The price of one Soyuz seat now requires NASA to pay Roscosmos approximately $8 million more, at $70.7 million per seat. On August 5, 2015, NASA was forced once again to extend its existing contract with Roscosmos to transport American astronauts to the ISS at a cost of $490 million.

Tell Congress that you support fully funding the Commercial Crew Program and that you want to end NASA’s dependence on expensive Soyuz trips: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

Sources:
1. Space Shuttle’s Lasting Legacy: 30 Years of Historic Feats
http://goo.gl/30Ktma
2. NASA to Pay $70 Million a Seat to Fly Astronauts on Soyuz
http://goo.gl/bQKAY
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Michael Interbartolo's profile photoLuby Sanders's profile photo
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Indeed we should never forget that Atlantis was the first reusable space shuttle that was in service for thirty years, made history for its 14 successful deployments and orbiting Earth almost 5 million times.

In addition, Atlantis provided the means for launching the NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, and it was the workhorse in constructing the International Space Station..

I personally hold a special place in my heart for this special amazing vehicle.

I am also writing a letter to Congress asking them to seriously to reconsider funding the Commercial Crew Program because it is unfair that with all the NASA's impressive space record history and accomplishments, they do not have their own form of transportation to the intended destinies. Paying $70 million dollars per seat to the Russian agency is absolutely outrageous!
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Penny4NASA

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Juno isn't the first spacecraft to reach its destination on July 4th. NASA's first Mars rover, Sojourner, landed on Mars on July 4, 1997.

Named for abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth, NASA’s Sojourner rover landed on Mars on July 4, 1997. Unlike previous landing systems that used conventional rockets to decelerate, the Sojourner rover used a parachute and a system of airbags to slow down before the rover dropped roughly 100 feet to the planet’s surface. This system comprised the Pathfinder lander, which was renamed the Carl Sagan Memorial Station after successfully delivering the rover. Sagan, a major proponent of the exploration of Mars, passed away shortly after the Mars Pathfinder mission launched on its way to the Red Planet.

Sojourner then set about its mission to analyze nearby rocks on the surface. Compositional analysis revealed that silica was found in higher concentrations in rocks than the surrounding area. Being found in igneous rocks, such a presence of silica was a hint that Mars may have had a more interesting geological history than was previously thought. Sojourner also sent pictures of the Martian surface back to NASA, while Pathfinder took photographs of the Martian sky. Among the photos from Sojourner were images showing rounded pebbles and conglomerate rocks indicating that different types of soil had been mixed in the past—evidence of a formerly water-rich planet.

Originally scheduled to operate for 7 sols (1 sol is about 40 minutes longer than a day on Earth), Sojourner had the possibility of extending its mission to 30 sols. In total, Sojourner operated for 83 sols before communications were lost on September 27, 1997. In that time, it covered just over 100 meters of the Martian surface.

Learn more about Sojourner here: http://goo.gl/i1axt
Urge Congress to help fund more planetary science missions: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

#IndependenceDay #July4th #Juno #Jupiter #Mars #NASA
#OnThisDay #CarlSagan  
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Penny4NASA

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Watch Live As NASA's Juno Spacecraft Enters Jupiter's Orbit

After a nearly 5-year journey, NASA’s Juno spacecraft is scheduled to reach its destination with a planned orbital insertion at Jupiter on July 4. Juno will become only the second spacecraft in history to orbit Jupiter, and it will be the first to conduct a polar orbit of the giant planet.

Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2016/07/04/watch-juno-spacecraft-enter-jupiter-orbit/

#NASA #Juno #Jupiter #Space #IndependenceDay #July4th  
We strive to increase NASA's funding to 1% by encouraging popular support for NASA through education and outreach.
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Penny4NASA

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On this day in 2012, Sally Ride passed away. As the first American woman to fly in space, she taught us all that the sky is not the limit!

#SallyRide #Space #Science #NASA #OnThisDay #History  
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Anna Belle's profile photoTruth Undenied's profile photoAaron Harper's profile photoMilady Blue's profile photo
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I just want to know, why did it take NASA so long to catch up with the Russian Space Program? They had a woman in space in 1963, Valentina Tereshkova, and it took the United States 20 some odd years to catch up to that.

All kudos and respect to Sally K. Ride, may she rest in peace, but it is shameful that it took so long to FINALLY make it possible for an American woman to finally get into space. Why was that?
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Penny4NASA

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On this day 47 years ago, Apollo 11 landed the first humans on the moon. No human has returned since 1972.

Tell Congress it’s time to take the next giant leap for mankind: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

#NASA #Apollo11 #Space #Science  
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John Michael Strubhart's profile photofrancis elimlim's profile photoManfred Laxy (Sir Manfred)'s profile photo
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If you can not see that this is fake, then you are a VOLL-IDIOT.
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Penny4NASA

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51 years ago today, Mariner 4 became the first spacecraft to perform a successful flyby of Mars

In a coincidence of astronomical proportions, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft conducted the first flyby of Pluto on the 50th anniversary of the first flyby of Mars. NASA’s Mariner 4 probe became the first spacecraft to capture up-close images of another planet when it flew past Mars on July 14, 1965.

Continue reading:
http://www.penny4nasa.org/2015/07/14/pluto-flyby-marks-50th-anniversary-of-first-mars-flyby/
We strive to increase NASA's funding to 1% by encouraging popular support for NASA through education and outreach.
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Christian Gutierrez's profile photo
 
In case you don't know, the picture of Pluto recently taken contains the outline of Disney's dog Pluto represented by light shaded areas.
Also, the recently taken picture of Jupiter showing off auroras in the north pole, is the exact same photo of Jupiter from 2014, and I do mean the same picture, with every cloud in the exact same spot.
How do you explain these two things? Do you still support nasa?
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Penny4NASA

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We strive to increase NASA's funding to 1% by encouraging popular support for NASA through education and outreach.
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Michael Borger's profile photoChristian Gutierrez's profile photo
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Tell me this isn't a fake, and tell me you don't see Disney's dog Pluto's outline on that photo!
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Penny4NASA

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On July 7, 2003, NASA’s Opportunity rover launched en route to Mars.

Since landing on Mars more than a decade ago, the rover has returned a wealth of scientific data. Opportunity studied the first meteorites discovered on another planet, and photographed the movement of both clouds and dust devils on Mars. Opportunity also uncovered evidence that water once flowed on Mars, and that in the past Mars had an environment that was hospitable to life.

Last year, Opportunity completed the first marathon on Mars, traveling farther than any other rover has on another world.

Read more about Opportunity here: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2015/03/24/opportunity-rover-completes-marathon-on-mars/

#NASA #Mars #Space #Science #OnThisDay
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Luis Aguilar Jr's profile photo
 
Wow
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Penny4NASA

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Happy 4th Of July! Enjoy Some Stellar Fireworks To End The Night.

The Cartwheel Galaxy is a ring galaxy located about 500 million light-years away in the constellation Sculptor. It was once a normal spiral galaxy until it experienced a head-on collision with a nearby galaxy approximately 100-200 million years ago. “Usually a galaxy is brighter toward the center, but the ultraviolet view (blue) indicates the collision actually smoothed out the interior of the galaxy, concentrating older stars and dust into the inner regions. It’s like the calm after the storm of star formation,” according to Phil Appleton of the California Institute of Technology.

The collision created waves of brief star formation rippling out from its center, the first being the bright blue outermost ring composed of many young massive stars. The second wave is the yellow-orange inner ring where less star formation is taking place. “It’s like dropping a stone into a pond, only in this case, the pond is the galaxy, and the wave is the compression of gas,” Appleton explained. “Each wave represents a burst of star formation, with the youngest stars found in the outer ring.”

Read more about the Cartwheel Galaxy here:
http://buff.ly/294iWpW
http://buff.ly/294jdsZ

Image Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

#IndependenceDay #July4 #Space #NASA
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NASA's annual budget is a half a penny on your tax dollar. Imagine what we could do with a full penny. http://bit.ly/-Imagine
Introduction
Penny4NASA was founded to uphold the importance of space exploration and science. We believe wholeheartedly that our federal funding of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, at a mere 0.48% of the total, does not reflect the hugely important economic, technological and inspirational resource that this agency has been throughout its 50+ year history. With approximately $10 coming back into the economy for every $1 spent, thousands of new science and engineering students becoming inspired continuously, and the multitude of technologies that NASA research has both directly and indirectly made possible, we believe that NASA needs to be funded at a level of at least 1% of the U.S. federal budget. This isn't a partisan argument, and this isn't a fiscal budget argument, this is the American people saying that as a society our tax dollars to reflect that importance of science and space exploration. And 0.48% doesn't cut it. We are calling for NASA budget to be increased to at least 1% of the US federal budget.
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