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The TerraMar Project
72,563 followers -
Sea Hope. Sea Change. Sea Future.
Sea Hope. Sea Change. Sea Future.

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Lemon Sharks Negaprion brevirostris are disguised in shallow coastal waters by the "yellow-ish" color of their back. What's unique about this shark is that its 2 dorsal fins are both large and relatively the same size. Most sharks only have 1 large dorsal fin. The largest populations of lemon sharks are found in the Atlantic Ocean's tropical and sub-tropical shallow seas.

These sharks are pickier eaters than most, and target bony fish, mollusks, and crustaceans. Research has also shown that Lemon Sharks have an apparent preference for social interaction, cooperation and the establishment of hierarchies of dominance and stable social relations. They also exhibit a learning capacity from such interactions.

These animals are listed as "Near-Threatened" on the IUCN Red List, due to loss of mangrove habitat and direct exploitation by finning, and bycatch in fisheries.

Check us out on Instagram! @theterramarproject

Photo: Albert kok/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

#lemonshark #marinelife #marinespecies #marineconservation #waterislife #vitaminsea#naturealwayswins #TerraMar #sharks #elasmobranch
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Ospreys are some of the world's best fishermen. These eagle-like birds dive from 30-100 feet up, and pluck fish from the water's surface with their curved claws. These avian predators can be found on every continent besides Antarctica.

Because their diet consists of 99% fish, Ospreys can be found near ponds, rivers, lakes, and coastal waterways around the world. Human habitat is sometimes an aid to the osprey. The birds happily build large nests on telephone poles, channel markers, and other such locations. Artificial nesting platforms are common in areas where preservationists are working to reestablish the birds. North American osprey populations became endangered in the 1950s due to chemical pollutants such as DDT, which thinned their eggshells and hampered reproduction. Ospreys have rebounded significantly in recent decades, though they remain scarce in some locales.

Photo: Brian Yurasits

#seabirds #oceanlife #VitaminSea #fishing #bird #osprey #conservation #cleanseas #fish #saveourocean
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Everything about the Red Lionfish Pterois volitans yells "don't touch, I'm venomous". These reef fish are native only to the Indo-Pacific, and everywhere else in the world they are an introduced species. Red Lionfish are easily recognizable from their vertical black and red stripes, and the up to 18 needle-like dorsal fins. The venomous spines on these animals are purely defensive in their purpose, and though a sting from one can be extremely painful to humans, it will rarely cause death. Red Lionfish hunt for small shrimp and fish in their rocky reef habitat.

Red Lionfish population numbers are healthy and their distribution is growing, causing some concern in places like the United States, where the success of this non-indigenous species presents human and environmental dangers. These fish are popular in the aquarium trade, and it is likely that their release from home aquariums may be the cause of their worldwide distribution.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: Alexander Vasenin/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

#marinelife #savethesea #oceanconservation #lionfish #poisonous #coralreef #reef #seahope #seachange #seafuture #TerraMar
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The Goliath Grouper Epinephelus itajara is the largest grouper in the Western Hemisphere. These guys can reach up to 8 feet in length and weigh up to 1,000 pounds! Between the Months of July and September, Goliath Groupers meet in large groups to spawn at special locations. Millions of eggs are released into the water at a time, and when fertilized, they end up in Mangrove estuaries where the young fish can grow in safety.

These groupers are so threatened by human actions because of their nature to aggregate in large groups, and grow at a slow rate. They are currently listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Redlist, due to past overfishing of their populations and loss of mangrove habitat to coastal development. A moratorium was placed on Goliath Groupers in 1990, prohibiting the harvest of any Goliath Grouper at sea.

Check us out on Instagram! @theterramarproject

Photo: Albert kok/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

#marinelife #marinespecies #TerraMar #GoliathGrouper #Grouper #VitaminSea
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Flying Gurnards Dactylopterus volitans are native to tropical and temperate waters of the Atlantic Ocean. When these animals get excited or threatened, they can fan out their large, brightly colored pectoral fins to scare away predators. These animals spend the majority of their time on sandy ocean bottoms using their pelvic fins as "legs" to walk along the ocean bottom feeling around for prey in the sand.

When Flying Gurnards are caught by fishermen, they're known to make a loud "grunting" noise. These animals are a species of least concern by the IUCN Red List, and are fairly abundant in the waters of the Atlantic.

https://www.instagram.com/theterramarproject/?hl=en

Photo: Jens Petersen/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

#marinelife #flyinggurnard #marinespecies #TerraMar #fish #flyingfish #marineconservation #highseas
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Happy #FlatsharkFriday! Dive into the weekend with good vibes and hope for the future.

Conservation takes time - it isn't accomplished overnight. But every day support grows to save our oceans. #SeaHope and keep up the awesome work! http://bit.ly/2EH5CYn

Photo: Albert Kok
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The Humphead or Napoleon wrasse is one of the largest reef fishes in the world and is the largest member of the wrasse family (Labridae). The enormous size of adult fish is made even more imposing by the prominent hump that develops on their forehead, from which they earn their common name. Mature adults also have thick lips; juveniles can be identified by their pale greenish colour and two black lines running behind the eye.

The Humphead Wrasse is widely distributed on coral reefs and inshore habitats throughout much of the tropical Indo-Pacific, from western Indian Ocean and Red Sea to southern Japan, New Caledonia and into the central Pacific Ocean.

This species can live at least 30 years, and is listed as an Endangered Species by the IUCN Red List, due to their slow growing nature and population declines in recent history.

Learn more by visiting us at: http://theterramarproject.org/

Photo: Derek Keats/Wikimedia Commons

#marinelife #wrass #marinespecies #conservation #marineconservation #reef #coralreef #endangered
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The Vaquita is the world's most endangered marine animal, and it's population is hanging on by a thread in Mexico. With less than 30 individuals (and dropping) left in the wild, Vaquitas are the world's smallest porpoise and are endemic to the Northern Gulf of California.

Unsustainable and illegal fishing practices are the main drivers pushing Vaquitas to extinction. Vaquitas share waters with the much sought-after totoaba fish and fishing nets inadvertently catch and drown these porpoises. Demand for totoaba swim bladders – believed to cure a variety of illness and diseases in Chinese medicine- is driving the vaquita to extinction. The swim bladders are often illegally smuggled over the US border and then shipped to China where it can sell up to USD 8,500 per kilogram in the black market.

On June 30, 2017, the government of Mexico announced a permanent ban on the use of gillnets in the Upper Gulf of California.

The Gulf of California World Heritage site is at risk of being listed as in danger by the World Heritage Committee. Mexico has been given one year to demonstrate that it is taking appropriate legal, scientific, technical, administrative and financial measures to protect this heritage site and the animals that live there—including the vaquita.

https://www.instagram.com/theterramarproject

Photo: Paula Olson/NOAA/Wikimedia Commons (CC0)

#Endangered #SaveOurOcean #MarineSpecies #Overfishing #Vaquita #VitaminSea #Conservation #Extinction
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Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks Sphyrna lewini are one of the most common species of hammerhead shark. Hammerhead sharks are easy to pick out in a crowd thanks to the unique "hammer" shape of their head. Their eyes and nostrils are located at the extreme ends of their head, and give the shark a unique vision of its environment. On the bottom of the shark's head are sensing organs called ampullae of Lorenzini which allow the sharks to detect prey under the sand.

Scalloped Hammerheads are found near-shore early in life, and then move out to the open ocean where they occupy in the world's tropical and sub-tropical waters. Sometimes these animals will gather in large schools, which is an usual behavior for such a top predator. They have relatively small mouths, and mostly hunt for stingrays and small fish species.

Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks are an endangered species, mostly due to human exploitation and by-catch in fisheries. Their schooling nature puts populations at a greater risk of exploitation, and there is a high demand for hammerhead shark fins. Hammerhead shark fins are worth more on the market because of their high fin ray count.

https://www.instagram.com/theterramarproject

Photo: Barry Peters/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

#marinelife #elasmobranch #hammerhead #shark #TerraMar #CostaRica
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