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The Enigmatic Carolina Bays Reveled in LiDAR
The Enigmatic Carolina Bays Reveled in LiDAR

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July 11, 2014    Kiptopeke Bay South, VA

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/1qQoiB

Presented today is the third adjacent  #bayShore of exactly the same length ( 1 Kilometer), width (0.8 kilometer) and bearing (132.3º) located at the southern end of the Delmarva Peninsula. The other two were discussed on previous #CBoD posts ( See http://goo.gl/iTUUx3 and http://goo.gl/XKi0Qx )

The South bay, like the “West” bay, has had half of its spatial footprint destroyed by the Chesapeake Bay’s migration to the East.  This situation leads me to believe that the shoreline’s trace across the West and South bays will provide a spectacular vertical exposure of three kilometers of bay subterranean architecture. And what an exposure - as shown in the Album’s elevation maps, the bay floor is 10 meters above the surface of the bay, and the rim is another 2.5 meters. The total exposure is 30,000 square meters across an entire Carolina bay complex.

Of the 360+ bays already blogged about in #CBoD , Kiptopeke Bay South certainly has the least provenance as a Carolina Bay. All that remains of its rim is the northeast segment, yet that arc does offer an excellent fit the the common planform overlay used in the other two bays here.

I have taken the name of the State Park they reside in to informally name the bay complex. I hope to visit Kiptopeke State Park this summer and scope out the possibilities of a research project to map the subterranean structure of the bay. 

One of the most intriguing things about this discovery is that the cross-bay exposures are almost entirely within the State Park. Accessing such an exposure is almost completely non-invasive, and contrasts with the thought of excavating a 1 kilometer long, 10 meter (30 ft) deep ditch across a wetland area - which be it private or public, is likely an impossible task.

The Album includes an hsv-shaded elevation map of the southern extent of the Eastern Shore. This demonstrates how the 3.5 kilometer wide higher-elevation central spine of the peninsula is truncated diagonally at this locale by the erosion of Chesapeake Bay outflow currents, effectively cutting the Bald Eagle Bluff for 13 kilometers. Along that extent, the West and South bays here are the only bays that have been partially removed.

The USGS topographic maps of the area do not indicate the three bays, but a smaller bay immediately to the east of South bay is identified.

The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured 60 bays in Octant 148303. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/148303.html

South Bay
Index #: 148303_6290
Location: 37.156064099679476,-75.97708607045917
Major: 1.1 km  . . . Minor: 0.8 km
Eccentricity: 0.677
Area: 69.93 hectares
Bearing: 132.3º
Elevation: 0.0 m
Archetype: bayShore
Effective Diameter: 943.596 m
#CBsurveyGrid_148303

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 11, 2014 Kiptopeke Bay South, VA
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July 10, 2014    Kiptopeke Bay West, VA

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/glJuak

The majority of the Carolina Bays present on the Eastern Shore of Virginia match the #bayShore shape, here is a the second in a complex three bays of exactly the same length ( 1 Kilometer), width (0.8 kilometer) and bearing (132.3º).  Today’s West bay is co-joined to yesterday’s #CBoD nose-to-tail with 60 meters of overlap. ( See http://goo.gl/iTUUx3 ) The only way in which they differ is a 130 meter offset of their major axis. 

Well, there is actually one other significant way in which they differ:  I interpret the LiDAR as documenting that the West bay has had about half of its surface area eroded away. The central backbone of the Eastern shore is comprised of the Princess Anne Terrace, which extends down from the central Delmarva Peninsula at an elevation of ~10 meters and continues over across the Chesapeake bay in southeastern Virginia; most bays are located on that elevated terrace. At this location, the terrace is abruptly truncated on a diagonal by erosion from the Chesapeake Bay currents, resulting in a 10 meter (30 foot) bluff which extends for ~13 kilometers across the peninsula at its southern end. A hsv-shaded elevation map in the Album demonstrates how the 3.5 kilometer wide higher-elevation central spine of the peninsula is truncated diagonally at this locale by (I assume) the erosion of Chesapeake Bay outflow currents, effectively cutting the Bald Eagle Bluff for 13 kilometers. Along that extent, there are the only two bays that have been partially removed.

This situation leads me to believe that the shoreline’s trace will provide a spectacular vertical exposure of the north rim, the south rim and several kilometers of the bay floor. And what an exposure - as shown in the Album’s elevation maps, the bay floor is 10 meters above the surface of the bay, and the rim is another 2.5 meters. The total exposure is 30,000 square meters across an entire Carolina bay complex. 

I have taken the name of the State Park they reside in to informally name the bay complex. I hope to visit Kiptopeke State Park this summer and scope out the possibilities of a research project to map the subterranean structure of the bay. 

One of the most intriguing things about this discovery is that the West bay cross-bay exposure is almost entirely within the State Park. Accessing such an exposure is almost completely non-invasive, and contrasts with the thought of excavating a 1 kilometer long, 10 meter (30 ft) deep ditch across a wetland area - which be it private or public, is likely an impossible task.

Adding to the joy is the existence of a man-made access ramp cut down through the northeastern rim of the West bay and then continuing down through the bay floor till it reaches the Chesapeake, again offering that same 12.5 meter exposure, only along a gentle ramp. 

That ramp is a wonder, but it was not constructed to deliver bathers to the beach. A 1952 Aerial Survey photo documents its original use - as the northern terminal for the Little Creek to Cape Charles Ferry, which was a  car transport and passenger ferry service operating across the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay from the 1930s until 1964, when it was replaced by the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel. During its peak, the Little Creek Ferry operated 90 one-way trips each day with seven vessels.The flagship of the seven-ship fleet, the 367-ft. SS Pocahontas carried 1,200 passengers and 120 vehicles. The six other ferries carried from 68 to 120 cars and up to 1,200 passengers. See more from Wikipedia: http://goo.gl/qHktnF

The attached Album includes Google Earth 3-D perspective screenshots of the exposures, with the elevation LiDAR providing the hsv-shaded elevation key.

The USGS topographic maps of the area do not indicate the three bays, but a smaller bay immediately to the southeast is identified.

The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured 60 bays in Octant 148303. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/148303.html

West Bay
Index #: 148303_6793
Location: 37.16979175932081,-75.98449013095644
Major: 1.1 km  . . . Minor: 0.8 km
Eccentricity: 0.677
Area: 69.92 hectares
Bearing: 132.3º
Elevation: 9.93 m
Archetype: bayShore
Effective Diameter: 943.529 m

#CBsurveyGrid_148303

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 10, 2014 Kiptopeke Bay West, VA
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July 9, 2014    Kiptopeke Bay East, VA

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/4rNGNn

The majority of the Carolina Bays present on the Eastern Shore of Virginia match the #bayShore shape, here used to measure a 1 Kilometer bay. I have taken the name of the State Park this bay sets in to informally name a complex of three bays of this size - today’s is the eastern-most and hence its name. The West bay and the South bay will be presented tomorrow and Friday, respectively. Of the three, the East bay is the most complete, whereas the other two have been heavily eroded away by the shore currents of the nearby Chesapeake Bay - but more on that in future posts.

The central backbone of the Eastern shore is comprised of the Princess Anne Terrace, which extends down from the central Delmarva Peninsula at an elevation of ~10 meters and continues over across the Chesapeake bay in southeastern Virginia; most bays are located on that elevated terrace. At this location, the terrace is abruptly truncated on a diagonal by erosion from the Chesapeake Bay currents, resulting in a 10 meter (30 foot) bluff which extends for ~13 kilometers across the peninsula at its southern end. A hsv-shaded elevation map in the Album demonstrates how the Chesapeake likely removed much of the terrace’s extent across what is now the mouth of Chesapeake Bay.

Historical Aerial photo image shows the bay floor to be in agricultural use back in 1950, before the creation of the State park.  US Rt 13 now passes over the eastern extent of the bay floor as an elevated 4-lane divided highway. The elevation map shows that the roadbed elevation is higher than the bay’s rim. Back in 1950, that expressway did not exist, but a railroad bed along the same path did. No man-made drainage outlets are visible in the LiDAR, but two very large collection ponds (> 130 m x 200m) are currently in the floor of the bay.  

The USGS topographic maps of the area do not indicate the three bays, but a smaller bay immediately to the southeast is identified. A trail guide for the State park is available via this link: http://goo.gl/qK31OX

The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured 60 bays in Octant 148303. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/148303.html

East Bay
Index #: 148303_6689
Location: 37.16589516821844,-75.97487309035444
Major: 1.1 km  . . . Minor: 0.8 km
Eccentricity: 0.677
Area: 69.92 hectares
Bearing: 132.3º
Elevation: 8.98 m
Archetype: bayShore
Effective Diameter: 943.529 m

#CBsurveyGrid_148303

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 9, 2014 Kiptopeke Bay East, VA
7 Photos - View album

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July 8, 2014    Easy Bay, NC

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/IBscJ1

Easy Bay is located in northern Sampson County. NC, just about halfway between Fayetteville and Goldsboro along US Rt 13. The bay is among the largest of the Carolina bays, but at 5.28 k on the major axis, there are still 25 bays in the survey which are larger still.

The landform was not recognized as a Carolina bay prior to the availability of LiDAR - and therefore has no appearance on the USGS Topographic Maps, nor has it been given a formal name.  I chose the name here informally after Easy Street, a local road which winds across the midsection of the bay floor.

Despite the fact that the USGS Topo does not recognize the primary bay because of the open drainage, there are a collection of small “daughter bays” framing Easy Bay which do make it onto the Topographic map.

The massive natural drainage channel of Seven Mile Swamp has eroded up into and for 4 kilometers along the major axis of the bay, effectively draining the entire basin and allowing it to remain unnoticed by man as a bay, and has little of the common Carolina bay habitat characteristics. Where it cuts through the bay rim, the channel is almost a kilometer wide.  Much of the land on the bay floor today is open farmland.  A 1950 Aerial survey photo shows the bay floor to be 75% forested 65 years ago.

Google Streetview imagery is available along Rt 13 as it crosses the extreme southeastern tip of the bay floor. The gentle rise of the rim can be seen to the south of the roadway at this point. The location of photos in the album is indicated by the placemark in the KMZ file, and can also be viewed interactively in your browser using this link:  http://goo.gl/OOkCuQ 

The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured over 400 bays in Octant 140313. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/140313.html

Index #: 140313_8887
Location: 35.221110172774644,-78.4691362147873
Major: 5.28 km  . . . Minor: 2.99 km
Eccentricity: 0.824
Area: 1241.7 hectares
Bearing: 142.49º
Elevation: 59.19 m
Archetype: bayCarolina
Effective Diameter: 3,976.151 m

#CBsurveyGrid_140313

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 8, 2014 Easy Bay, NC*
8 Photos - View album

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As the #CBoD  bay count rises, I am finding more and more bays which exhibit what might be called "Deep Penetration" from headword stream erosion. Here is a live album which displays their hsv-LiDAR image.

Bays are only seen on un-disected landscapes. In areas with greater relief, they are found on flat ridges which have survived from their original broad and flat regression terraces. Perhaps the Eastern Coastal Terraces were originally covered with far more bays, but most have been erased by dissection and erosion.  Considering how flat the terrain is, and how slow erosion is know to occur, the bays may well be hundreds of thousands of years old.
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Deeply Penetrated bays
26 Photos - View album

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July 7, 2014    Ocean Gate Bay, NJ

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/oOIy3c

While the Carolina Bays further south are perhaps more grand due to the shear size of some, the bays of Deleware, Maryland, New Jersey and Long Island are intriguing to me because of their ability to present the characteristics of the #bayBell spices in spite of their diminutive size. That said, today’s #CBoD offering is over 1/2 kilometer in diameter. 

Located about 1 kilometer from the Atlantic Ocean’s Barnegat Bay and with a bay floor 1 meter above sea level, this #bayBell Carolina bay has a tenuous hold on the landscape. A 1959 Aerial Survey photo suggests that Ocean Gate attempted to expand the city’s fixed size street grid six blocks to the south and across the bay, but only the northern 1 1/2 blocks of the subdivision was successful within the bay’s basin. I can only assume that the builders found the remainder of the track to be too wet to build on - the roads have been overgrown and almost invisible to the satellite eye.

While the bay’s shape shows well in the LiDAR, there are no indication it exists when referencing the USGS topographic map. The name of the city and the avenue which leads into the center of the bay was used informally here as its name.

Today there are but a few homes within the bay’s footprint, and all are on or close to the northern rim segment closest to the city.

The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured only 8 bays in Octant 159296. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/159296.html

Index #: 159296_6856
Location: 39.92225775794908,-74.14068904598975
Major: 0.53 km  . . . Minor: 0.44 km
Eccentricity: 0.562
Area: 18.82 hectares
Bearing: 120.91º
Elevation: 1.88 m
Archetype: bayBell
Effective Diameter: 489.513 m

#CBsurveyGrid_159296

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 7, 2014 Ocean Gate Bay, NJ
6 Photos - View album

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July 6, 2014    Harrells Bay, NC

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/GbbkGO

Harrells Bay was noticed by me on the USGS Topographic map of Delway, NC, prior to being identified in the LiDAR survey. It is big (over 1 1/4 km) but subtle. After reviewing the bay for this post, it is clear there are other bays in the area which were also overlooked in my initial canvas.

I have correlated the shape to the #bayCarolina , and the fit looks to be satisfactory. The shape and orientation are also seen in other bays in the area. One unusual aspect is the absence of an eastern rim and the lack of often-seen sand dune structures in that area of the rim. This suggests that the generation of that southeastern dune is not the controlling aspect in the creation of a bay. It is my interpretation that southeastern dunes rising above the rim - and clearly visible as wind blown dune shapes - are surficial alterations to the pre-existing Carolina Bay landform/

A 1957 aerial survey photo demonstrates that the bay and surrounding area were under native forest at that time.  Today the entire area is in use as a tree plantation, with neat rows throwing off the LiDAR elevation map because if its thick canopy.

The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured ~100 bays in Octant 139312. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/139312.html

This is a revised and expanded version of a post from December 2012.

Index #: 139312_0963
Location: 34.774051950234906,-78.15797141175713
Major: 1.28 km  . . . Minor: 0.81 km
Eccentricity: 0.774
Area: 81.87 hectares
Bearing: 140.28º
Elevation: 26.93 m
Archetype: bayCarolina
Effective Diameter: 1,020.979 m

#CBsurveyGrid_139312

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 6, 2014 Harrells Bay, NC
6 Photos - View album

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July 5, 2014    Clark Lagoon, NE

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/NPe7Oe

Clark Lagoon hosts the Clark Federal Waterfowl Production Area, which resides in the central portion of its basin. 

This #bayWest landform has a natural outlet to the east, but at an elevation above the current level of the central basin.  That central portion remains quite wet during the rainy seasons, and may be artificially fed by pumped water, allowing it to support the wildlife habitat. Nebraska Birding Trails lists the following information about the Area:

Located in Kearney County, 6 miles east and 1 mile north of Wilcox. Habitat includes 227 acres of wetland and 224 acres of upland.

The WPA is surrounded by working farms, but the satellite imagery suggest the WPA proper is currently undeveloped. A 1953 Aerial Survey image is included in the KMZ and the Album, and it documents that the region around the bay has changed little in the past 60 years. Most apparent is the extensive implementation of circular gantry irrigation systems over the past 20 years, as none were evident in 1953 or in 1994.

While searching for information about Clark Lagoon, I identified a comprehensive monograph entitled “Birds of the Rainwater Basin, Nebraska” (2012), by Joel G. Jorgensen of the Nongame Bird Program, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. It can be downloaded from http://goo.gl/Gk5Qi6 . Here is an introductory paragraph:

The Rainwater Basin (RWB), located in south-central Nebraska, is known internationally as a critically important region for birds. This recognition developed when it became apparent that large proportions of North America’s mid-continental duck and goose populations stopped-over in the region’s playa wetlands during spring migration. In 1992, the RWB was designated as its own Joint Venture under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (USFWS-CWS-MMERF 1994). More recently, research has shown that the RWB plays a similar role for shorebirds that use these playa wetlands and terrestrial habitats during migration. In 2009, the RWB was recognized as the first “Landscape of Hemispheric Importance” by the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network (WSHRN 2012). With an increased understanding of the RWB’s role in supporting migratory waterfowl and shorebird populations, there is a corresponding focus on the importance of wetland conservation.

On the topic of Geomorphology, Jorgensen’s paper included the following, which is consistent with my understand of basin development:

Recent work by Kuzila (1988, 1994), Kuzila and Lewis (1993) and Kuzila et al. (1991) provide additional information on the development of the RWB landscape. Kuzila (1994) found that the modern landscape and soil layer generally mirrors a previous “paleolandscape” that was deposited prior to the Wisconsinan Period. Thus, modern basins and ridges (lunettes) cover “paleobasins” and “paleoridges”; modern ridges tend to have less relief than the “paleoridges”.

Google Streetview is available along 26 Rd as it traverses the bay. An image in the album shows the view from bay floor looking south towards rim in distance along horizon. You can tour the bay traverse in your browser interactively using this link:  http://goo.gl/KltkoJ

The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured 23 bays in Octant 161396. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/161396.html

Index #: 161396_5022
Location: 40.377051372579665,-99.05604895290608
Major: 3.19 km  . . . Minor: 1.85 km
Eccentricity: 0.813
Area: 466.11 hectares
Bearing: 253.33º
Elevation: 658.98 m
Archetype: bayWest
Effective Diameter: 2,436.12 m

#CBsurveyGrid_161396

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 5, 2014 Clark Lagoon, NE
7 Photos - View album

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July 4, 2014    Claude Green Bay, NC

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/9bYyVK

Today’s #CBoD is located 3 kilometers northwest of Robersonvill, in Martin County, NC. I have measured it using two overlapping #bayCarolina templates, both of exactly the same size and orientation. I find it intriguing that such a natural landform could be mapped so precisely using two identical templates slightly offset. The offsets are similar to the situation at three bays near each other 175 km to the southwest: Lammon (4/1/2014), Dobbins (4/6/2014) and Herndon (4/11/2014).

Another fascinating aspect of this bay is that there are two natural drainage channels which have penetrated the rim and into the bay. Furthermore, the resulting erosion of the bay’s floor has seemingly revealed the normally buried interleaved rim segments. Those often “missing” rim traces map perfectly to the two templates used. As such, Claude Green Bay would make an excellent research site. Since the bay is primarily drained and dry due to the natural drainage, access would not be difficult or invasive to an intact bay natural habitat. 

The natural drainage has allowed the bay to be undetectable on the USGS topographic map, and has remained unidentified as a Carolina Bay. The name was taken here informally for the bay using the local road which crosses its southwestern rim (it enters and leaves the bay about the same location as the natural drainage).

The reveled rim segments are obvious in the cross-bay elevation profile map, along with a raised roadbed. Such clues in the “sand” reminds me of a great quote offered by George Howard:

Given a confident belief that the answers are indeed out there in the sand, we come then to the true shame of the Carolina Bay story: the willingness of the current geophysical research community to tolerate and admit such a profound "mystery" in their midst. I've known respected professional earth scientists to brush off questions about Carolina Bay origin with references to "alien landings" and "giant fish." With prodding, they generally elicit a thin collage of wind and wave theory faintly recalled from their student years. One gets the distinct feeling that the study of Carolina Bay origin is the "crazy aunt in the attic" of the Coastal Plain researcher. And that visiting his dear relative is hardly worth the disturbing consequences.

Google Streetview imagery is available along Claude Green Road. You can tour the road as it passes the bay using this link in your web browser:  http://goo.gl/qTn5AI

The bay floor has been used for tree plantation use, and its evolution can be seen in the imagery available in the KMZ file and the attached album. An aerial survey photo from 1950 shows the bay to be mostly in a natural forested state, excepting some fo the higher rim areas. By the time of the 1993 Google satellite imagery, the bay follr is primarily neat rows of tree plantation, which had become thick and lush by the 2006 image. Today the satellite imagery shows a large swath fo the bay floor to be bear earth, the trees having been harvested. In a stroke of luck, the Google Streetview imagery is from 2008, at which time much of that swath had been harvested, but many tall trees still remained. Life of a tree plantation, Carolina Bay style.


The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured 34 bays in Octant 143309. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/143309.html

Index #: 143309_3812
Location: 35.845704484153586,-77.28130776462905
Major: 1.15 km  . . . Minor: 1.01 km
Eccentricity: 0.489
Area: 91.94 hectares
Bearing: 130.57º
Elevation: 20.33 m
Archetype: bayCarolina
Effective Diameter: 1,081.949 m

Index #: 143309_3811
Location: 35.84527603445764,-77.2780933363543
Major: 1.15 km  . . . Minor: 1.01 km
Eccentricity: 0.489
Area: 91.94 hectares
Bearing: 130.57º
Elevation: 20.51 m
Archetype: bayCarolina
Effective Diameter: 1,081.949 m

#CBsurveyGrid_143309

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 4, 2014 Claude Green Bay, NC
8 Photos - View album

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July 3, 2014    Deep Bottom Bay, SC

View in Google Earth:  http://goo.gl/0hg21b

The wetland known by the USGS as Deep Bottom Bay may well extend far beyond the boundaries of the mapped #baySouth template, but I have chosen to apply the name here only to the northernmost of a collection of overlapped bay shapes. By itself, it is over 2.5 kilometers long.

The name was likely given this bay because of its deep north central section, which has been eroded extensively by Deep Bottom Creek entering from the north. That creek has migrated across 3/4 of the bay - which must have taken a considerable period of time. 

At the 10 o’Clock position on the rim, the LiDAR shows the existence of a 300 meter wide paleochannel where Deep Bottom Creek may have previously flowed around outside the northwest rim, before successfully breaching it. Since the breach, Deep Bottom Creek has effectively abandoned the paleochannel. I have traced the proposed drainage patterns in the KMZ file, and are measured in the Elevation Profile maps along cross-structure transects.

The entire bay floor is forested, suggesting that it has remained quite wet, in spite of the extensive natural drainage. This reminded us that the entire coastal plain is virtually as flat as a pool table, and water movement (and erosion) is a slow process.

The Carolina Bay Survey [http://cintos.org/Survey] has identified and measured 14 bays in Octant 131323. Their location and metrics can be referenced through a Fusion Table spatial visualization: http://cintos.org/FusionMap/131323.html

Index #: 131323_9418
Location: 32.985392579995505,-80.79608474149552
Major: 2.57 km  . . . Minor: 1.88 km
Eccentricity: 0.681
Area: 380.49 hectares
Bearing: 145.91º
Elevation: 21.35 m
Archetype: baySouth
Effective Diameter: 2,201.031 m

#CBsurveyGrid_131323

Indexes to my Carolina Bay of the Day Blogs: http://cintos.org/CBoD/
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July 3, 2014 Deep Bottom Bay, SC
6 Photos - View album
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