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Queeniey Corliss
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Microsoft finally unveils its new browser called Edge
At last the long wait is over,
Microsoft finally reveals its official name for its new web browser plans last
January, dubbed as Microsoft Edge, which is previously code-named Project
Spartan. Microsoft made the
announcement at the annual Build Developer Co...

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Microsoft finally unveils its new browser called Edge

At last the long wait is over, Microsoft finally reveals its official name for its new web browser plans last January, dubbed as Microsoft Edge, which is previously code-named Project Spartan.

Microsoft made the announcement at the annual Build Developer Conference 2015. Edge will replace Internet (http://queenieycorliss.tumblr.com/) Explorer as the default browser of Windows 10 PCs, smartphones and tablets. It's not surprising that the nickname "Edge" is based on the new rendering engine that Microsoft is using for its Windows 10 browser which is called EdgeHTML.

Joe Belfiore, the Corporate Vice President, Operating Systems Group at Microsoft also said that the name was referred to the idea of Microsoft being on the edge of consuming and creating.

Microsoft Edge is designed to be a lightweight web browser with a layout engine built around web standards that is created for interoperability with the contemporary web.

The browser's new logo appears to be similar to the Internet Explorer's logo. However, the directions of the swirls have been changed and the color is a bit darker.

Microsoft Edge consists of unique features such as the ability to annotate on web pages, modern and futuristic design for new tabs which appear to have a flat design concept, jotting down notes or draw on top of web pages for a great way of reading and consuming content, favorites folder built into the browser, thumbnails of frequently visited websites, web applications and further integration with digital assistant Cortana to offer more personalized results and actions.

Developers will be able to carry their Chrome extensions or Firefox add-ons with just a couple of changes to Microsoft Edge.

Microsoft Edge also enables users to engage with sites and provide them a chance at starting to write some web code, which they may put into an application through web extensions built into the web browser.

Stay tuned on The Corliss Tech Review Group (http://thecorlissreviewgroup.com/blog) blog for more updates.

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European Union accuses Google of market abuse
European
Union has formally charged Google of abusing its dominant position on the
internet search market. According
to a Corliss Tech Review Group report, Google has used its gigantic power as a search engine to redirect
internet users from rivals to its o...

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The Corliss Group Tech Review: Bank hackers steal millions worldwide
The banking sector has been a frequent target for hackers nowadays. As much as US$1 billion were stolen from banks and other financial companies worldwide in about two years, wherein it is considered as one of the biggest banking breaches known, by a multin...

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Google Reduced Fifty Percent of Android Malwares
As
stated by Corliss Tech Review Group ,
a malware is a type of software that is specifically created to gain access or
damage user’s sensitive data. Android
has long been seen as vulnerable to malware because it is an open platform and
several devices run ...

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The Corliss Group Latest Tech Review - Protect Your Assets By Practicing Common-Sense Cybersecurity
 
Let’s get the scary stuff out of the way upfront: Cybercrime costs the global economy $575 billion annually, according to reports. The United States takes a $100 billion hit, the largest of any country, according to Politico. A report from former U.S. intelligence officials counted 40 million people whose personal information was stolen within the past year.

Online theft is huge, and it only seems to be getting worse. Hardly a week goes by without some story about hackers penetrating a computer system somewhere. Corporations, individuals, even White House servers were hacked last week. I sometimes wonder just how difficult it is for a determined bad guy to access grandma’s checking account or your neighbor’s IRA and grab those assets.

I am not the only one thinking about this. New York State Department of Financial Services issued a report on cybersecurity in the banking sector, where more than 150 organizations rely on third-party service providers for critical banking functions. The regulators want the banks to tighten security.

So should you.

We spend most of our time in financial markets looking at ways to deploy our capital: What assets to buy or sell, how much we should save for retirement, whether we should own more of these stocks and less of those bonds.

We don’t spend so much time thinking about the ways we can lose that money — to fraud and to common theft. We should be more vigilant, especially as we move our lives online, with digital access to our checking and savings accounts, our online portfolios, even our taxes.

It is impossible to make yourself hack-proof, but you can make yourself less vulnerable.

It all starts with some common-sense security steps. Three ways you probably can improve your existing practices: Develop better e-mail habits, beef up password security and (as always) remember that your behavior is the root of most of your problems.

Get your e-mail act together

Every day, your inbox fills with all manner of junk. Some of it is merely time-wasting nonsense, but let’s not forget about the really dangerous stuff: phishing schemes, malicious viruses and malware. It seems the only reprieve we get are those rare occasions when the main servers in Russia — a.k.a. Spambot Central — gets temporarily knocked off-line.

It’s more than a huge productivity killer, it’s a financial hazard. That $100 billion a year we mentioned above comes out of everyone’s pockets. Even if you have not been hacked, you are paying for it in some way. Banking costs are higher as financial firms spend hundreds of millions of dollars a year on security.

People have tried a variety of ways to tackle this: Filters, whitelists, e-mail verifiers and trusted ID services; disposable ­ e-mail addresses from sites such as Mailinator; “junk” e-mail addresses from Hotmail, Yahoo or Google. And still the danger keeps coming.

I have a few tricks I use to keep the really nasty stuff under control, such as:

●View e-mail as plain text.

All of the bad links, embedded viruses and other malware go away when you select “view as plain text.” Sure, you lose all of the graphics and links, but you lose the threats as well.

●Create a primary e-mail address.

This is your main address — for colleagues, clients and peers. Never share this e-mail address. Don’t subscribe to anything using this address — no Internet mailing lists, no subscriptions, nada. Use this address alone for your finance- and business-related e-mails. Anything unrelated is junk; treat it that way. Block the domains of senders. Mark junk mail as junk.

●Use an e-mail forwarder.

I have been a big fan of Leemail.me. Instead of giving out my e-mail address, I use Leemail to auto-generate an address whenever I want to share my e-mail with an unfamiliar company. It forwards my e-mail from the company to me. When I want to shut that sender off, I flick a button.

Tracking the companies that share or sell your e-mail address is invaluable. The basic version of Leemail is, astonishingly, free, and the upgrade is only a few bucks a year.

●Don’t hit “unsubscribe”; get blacklisted instead.

There are a number of companies that provide e-mail services to third parties, shops such as Constant Contact, Vertical Response and iContact. They are the middlemen between businesses and consumers. And while they claim to be “opt-in only” and not spammers, in truth, they are subject to whatever bad behaviors their clients engage in. They all have become legal quasi-spammers.

On every e-mail these companies send, there is an unsubscribe button. NEVER CLICK THAT. When you do, you are not unsubscribing. Rather, you are verifying that your e-mail address is legitimate.

Instead, go to the company Web site and track down the customer service number. Call customer service and insist on having your e-mail or domain “blacklisted.” Thats the only way to ensure you will truly be unsubscribed. If the company refuses, file a Federal Trade Commission complaint.

Password security

If you were like I was five years ago, you had one simple password that you used for everything — Amazon, Facebook, Wall Street Journal — everywhere. This could’ve been disastrous. Now all passwords are different. Avoid the common errors, such as using birthdays or your kids’ names. Never use sequential numbers. And for goodness sake, don’t use “password” as your actual password.

Put all of your passwords on a document named something other than “My passwords.” I find burying passwords somewhere in a spreadsheet to be useful. Print out a copy and place it in your safety deposit box with other important papers.

Your biggest risk? You.

I have said all too often that when it comes to investing, people are their own worst enemy. Behavioral problems are rife in security as well. Get into the practice of thinking about security, and soon it becomes second nature.

The Securities and Exchange Commission has gotten much more serious about personal financial data security. They have informed advisers and brokers that there is a duty to protect client data. When we set up our wealth-management practice, we put into place specific policies and procedures to protect clients:

● All sensitive information is sent by secure e-mail using a third party for encryption.

● We never e-mail Social Security numbers or account numbers or other private data via regular email.

● We went totally paperless. Our file cabinets are empty, everything is cloud based.

● Any documents that arrive are shredded, so even our outgoing garbage is secure with nothing usable to a thief.

Most of this is common sense. However, many people are still vulnerable. With smarts and a bit of awareness, you can make your financial assets much more secure.

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The Corliss Group Latest Tech Review - Protect Your Assets By Practicing Common-Sense Cybersecurity
Let’s get the scary stuff out of
the way upfront: Cybercrime costs
the global economy $575 billion annually, according to reports. The United
States takes a $100 billion hit, the largest of any country, according to
Politico. A report from former U.S. intel...

Post has attachment
The Corliss Group Latest Tech Review - Us Regulator To Impose New Cyber Security Standards For Banks And Their Supply Chain
 
A new report highlighting deficiencies in US banks' oversight of suppliers' cyber security should serve to remind financial services companies in Europe of the due diligence they need to undertake, an expert has said.

Financial services and technology law expert Angus McFadyen of Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind Out-Law.com, said that regulators in both the US and Europe are increasingly interested in what financial services companies are doing to address cyber security threats.

McFadyen was commenting after the New York State Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) announced its intention to introduce new regulations "strengthening cyber security standards for banks' third-party vendors" in the "coming weeks".

The announcement was made as it revealed that fewer than half of the banks it surveyed said they do not "conduct any on-site assessments" of "high-risk" suppliers, such as data processing companies and other suppliers that typically have access to "sensitive bank or customer data".

The NYDFS report (7-page / 313KB PDF) also said that only about 30% of the banks surveyed "require their third-party vendors to notify them in the event of an information security breach or other cyber security breach".

A fifth of the banks do not require suppliers to set "minimum information security requirements", whilst of those that do only a third "require those information security requirements to be extended to subcontractors of the third-party vendors", it said.

"A bank's cyber security is often only as good as the cyber security of its vendors," Benjamin Lawsky, superintendent of financial services at the NYDFS, said. "Unfortunately, those third-party firms can provide a backdoor entrance to hackers who are seeking to steal sensitive bank customer data. We will move forward quickly, together with the banks we regulate, to address this urgent matter."

McFadyen said that although "security is a growing concern on both sides of the Atlantic" the action proposed by the NYDFS is "the most forthright we’ve seen".

"European regulators are also actively looking at security," McFadyen said. "We’ve seen new rules around payment security come out of Europe and the Financial Conduct Authority’s (FCA's) own guidance on bank outsourcing touches on its importance. Security measures are rarely perfect, as we’ve seen with the takedown of the French TV channel TV5Monde, but the risks presented by a compromise in the sector are growing as we are increasingly digitising financial services."

McFadyen pointed to a recent announcement by the FCA on the implementation of new internet payments security guidelines in the UK as highlighting the regulatory focus there is on cyber security.

The FCA has said it will incorporate the new guidelines into its "supervisory framework" at the same time as the new EU Payment Services Directive (PSD2), which is still being negotiated, is transposed into UK law. The internet payment security guidelines were finalised late last year by the European Banking Authority (EBA).

"We are fully supportive of the objectives behind the guidelines and agree with the importance of consumers being protected against fraud when making payments online," the FCA said. "Ensuring the security of payments and the protection of sensitive customer data is a critical part of the infrastructure of robust payment systems."

"Many firms already have in place measures for strong customer authentication, and we would remind payment service providers of their responsibility to ensure consumers’ payments are safe and secure. We will be incorporating the detail of the requirements of the guidelines into our supervisory framework in line with the revised Payment Services Directive (PSD2) transposition timeline," it said.

Connect with us

https://twitter.com/CorlissTech

http://queenieycorliss.tumblr.com/

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The Corliss Group Latest Tech Review - Us Regulator To Impose New Cyber Security Standards For Banks And Their Supply Chain
A new report highlighting
deficiencies in US banks' oversight of suppliers'
cyber security should serve to remind financial services companies in
Europe of the due diligence they need to undertake, an expert has said. Financial services and technology
law e...

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The Corliss Group Latest Tech Review: Facebook to launch social network for cyber security experts
Facebook is launching a social
network for cyber security professionals to share information about
threats that could lead to cyber attacks, as the US government and companies
search for new ways to co-ordinate their defences. The world’s largest social net...
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