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Lynn Easley
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Celebrating the 4th with 300,000+ fireworks (stars) M 13 The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules. Taken last night with the RC10 and ZWO 1600MMC camera.
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Messier 53 Globular Cluster located in the constellation of Coma Berenices. One of the more globular clusters of the Milky Way at 58,000 light-years distance.

Imaged with the RC10 and 1600MMC camera.
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Color version of galaxy NGC 6946 with supernova SN 2017eaw with open cluster NGC 6939.
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Finally a clear night.

Supernova SN 2017eaw from last night at magnitude 12.83 using a "V" filter (green). Discovered by Patrick Wiggins on May 14, its the 10th supernova discovered in the aptly named Fireworks Galaxy, NGC 6946. It is a Type II-P core collapse supernova. NGC 6946 is located in the constellation of Cygnus, and is about 22 million light years away.

Imaged with the 80mm refractor, and Atik 314 mono ccd through a "V" filter.
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Messier 16 aka The Eagle Nebula.
Quick image of M16 and the "Pillars of Creation" made famous by the Hubble Telescope. Imaged with the RC10 and ZWO1600 monochrome camera early this morning.
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NGC 2261 is often called Hubble's Variable Nebula. Named after Edwin Hubble, who carried out some of the earlier studies of this object. Discovered in 1783 by William Herschel, and was the first object photographed by the 200 inch Hale telescope. It was Hubble who first noticed the changes in the nebula in photographs. The object changes in brightness and shadows in the structure of the nebula. The changes occur over weeks and months. The best theory explaing it, is dense knots of dust streamers cast shadows on the reflection nebula. The nebula is illuminated by the star R Mon, which is a young Orion type star. It is an irregular, eruptive type of variable star that can vary as much as 2 magnitudes in brightness.

Imaged with a 10" RC scope and ZWO 1600mmc monochrome camera.
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M81 also known as Bode's Galaxy is a spiral galaxy in Ursa Major, one of its neighbors is M82 is also know as the Cigar galaxy is a star burst galaxy. The star burst activity is thought to have been triggered by interactions with M81. Both are approximately 12 million light years away.

Image taken with the ED80CFT Refractor and Atik 314L+ mono ccd using 120 second exposures through LRGB filters.
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The Twin Quasars were one of the first observable effects of gravitational lensing. Light passing through a galaxy YGKOW G1 and its associated cluster located between Earth and the quasar is bent by the gravity of the galaxy cluster to form the double image.

Interestingly the light from the "b" image arrives about 14 months later than from the "a" image due to the extra distance it travels due to the lensing effect. The by redshift measurement of the quasar the estimated distance is 7.9 to 14 billion light years away. The quasar is near magnitude 17, and the images are separated by 6 arc-seconds and is located in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Hubble Image: http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1403a/

A few billion dollars does get you much better pictures!


Color images taken with the 80 mm refractor, and the inset image was taken with a larger 254 mm scope.
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Imaged the recent nova in Sagittarius, TCP J18102829-2729590, and they say scientists are bad at naming stuff :-)

Easy to see why so many novas are discovered in this location of the sky. Also did a photometric observation of it in using a "V" filter and came up with a magnitude of 8.234 
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NGC 891 is a spiral galaxy located in the constellation of Andromeda.

From our viewpoint it is edge on. It is thought that this is how our Milky Way galaxy would look from that angle, being similar to our galaxy. Interesting enough, our galaxy would be mostly invisible to anything in that galaxy due to the amount of dust and gas from looking through the thick sections of the spiral arms. Most galaxies that we can see are located above or below our own galaxy.

NGC 891 is located some 27 million light years away. Also visible are many distant galaxies, some only appear as smudges. One of the brighter object is NGC 898, at magnitude 13.8, is in excess of 266 million light years away based on its red shifted light.

Image was assembled from 103 x 180 second exposures through Lum filter, and 28 x 300 second exposures through R/G/B filters for a total integration time of 12+ hours. Imaging scope was the 80 mm refractor and Atik 314L+ mono ccd camera.
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10/25/16
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