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David Sanchez
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How about a hearty Steak & Eggs entree, Chilaquiles, or some spicy Huevos Rancheros? Top it off with a Blood Orange Bellini or a Blush Bloody Mary, and you’ve got the ingredients for a perfect day. Enjoy good food in a great atmosphere while you and dad take time to get to know each other again.
#SantaBarbaraRestaurants
#CaliforniaCuisine

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Max’s Restaurant is located at 3514 State Street, Santa Barbara, in the Upper State St. area. The Santa Barbara family restaurant serves breakfast and lunch Monday through Sunday from 7:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. Fine Italian cuisine and home-made Italian pasta are served Tuesday through Saturday evenings, from 5:00 until 9:00 p.m. 
#ItalianCuisine
#SantaBarbaraRestaurant

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Take a break and let us do the cooking this year.   The hustle and bustle of the holidays can stress out the calmest of souls. Arm yourself with these stress-reducing tips and have yourself a relaxing holiday season. Here are tips For a Stress-free Holiday in Santa Barbara from the Santa Barbara family restaurant - Max’s Restaurant.
#SantaBarbaraDining
#MaxsRestaurant

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Snowflake-a-Day #49
This will probably be in my top 10 for me this series. I love the shift in patterns and the almost regal, crown-like appeal of the branch tips. Do me a favour and view large!
 
As a snowflake grows, it tumbles around in a cloud. That cloud is moving and there are so many ways for growth to be affected by a change in the environment directly around the snowflake. Temperature, humidity, air turbulence, elevation, and many other factors all shape how a snowflake is formed. If those variables change drastically during the growth of a snowflake, you’ll see a noticeable change in the type of crystal part-way through its “life”.
 
This snowflake began as a capped column, and took on a split crystal pattern as plates grew into branches. Two opposing plates exist on either side of a column, and each set of twin corners fight for water vapour by chance or by aerodynamics, one corner always wins. In this case, the top plate won three sides and so did the bottom plate. The very top and the two bottom-most branches belong to the top plate, and the others belong to the bottom. You can see an interesting connection to this all the way to the tips of the branches.
 
Certain features of snowflakes will only grow on one side of the crystal. You’ll notice that the branches associated with the bottom have plenty of interesting surface features spanning multiple levels of depth. You’ll see a faint representation of these same features on the top branches, because you’re seeing them through the ice – they are on the opposite side of the crystal. One side has a huge amount of topography, and the other side is nearly completely smooth. The only feature you can see is a faint circle, indicating inward crystal growth from the outer edge of the branch tip.
 
Because this snowflake gives me a unique opportunity to see the exact shape of features on each side of the crystal, it might make a worthy candidate for modelling in 3D with all the information needed to make an accurate representation. Once this Snowflake-a-Day marathon is over, that’s the next big project. :)
 
Finding snowflakes like this are why I keep shooting during every snowfall. You never know what you’ll come across falling from the sky!
 
For an engaging read on the physics and photography of snowflakes, you’ll enjoy Sky Crystals: https://skycrystals.ca/book/ - 304 pages full of content to make you think, and to help you make images exactly like this.
 
Snowflakes of every design have been included in this print that took me 5 years and 2500 hours of work to produce, titled “The Snowflake”: https://skycrystals.ca/poster/ - to see what over 400 crystals look like all in proportion to one another, you’ve got to check it out. Do it as a favour to me if you enjoyed this image!
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Clown Triggerfish

Did you know: Triggerfish can "trigger" their fins to extend in order to lock themselves into holes, crevices, and other hiding spots.

This particular species is called the Clown Triggerfish, you can guess why...
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Since the new year, the price of oil has surprised even the most bearish punters. Read why: http://econ.st/1nvtA0o
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