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Ondřej Čertík
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Unusual view.
From below, marbled-looking swirls of Jupiter’s atmosphere can be seen in this citizen scientist created image that uses data from our Juno spacecraft: http://go.nasa.gov/2kNj9W8
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I didn't realize that tomorrow (January 27) will be exactly 50 years from the Apollo 1 fire.
Leading up to our annual Day of Remembrance on Tuesday, we're honoring the Apollo 1 crew for the 50th anniversary of the tragedy at 10 a.m. EST today at the Astronauts Memorial Foundation hall in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Watch live: https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive
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A similar Curtiss-design pusher is available for everybody to see at the Albuquerque airport since 1989. It's in great condition, and I am very happy that "The Albuquerque Museum and the Albuquerque International Sunport jointly purchased this historic airplane for the people of Albuquerque.", more at the link below. I spent at least an hour just looking at it at the airport one time, and every time I arrive in ABQ, I spend several seconds looking at it, as it is prominently displayed there when you exit the airport.

https://www.cabq.gov/culturalservices/albuquerque-museum/museum-collections/history/online-history-exhibitions/the-1914-ingram-foster-biplane
Today in 1911: Eugene Burton Ely made the first successful landing and take-off from a naval vessel. In this photo, Ely guides his Curtiss Model D biplane for an imminent landing on a platform constructed on the stern of the USS Pennsylvania, anchored in San Francisco Bay, CA.

While Ely had flown from the deck of the USS Birmingham the previous November, this was the first successful landing of an airplane on a ship. Paired with a take-off from the USS Pennsylvania later that same day, the achievement marked the beginning of naval aviation. More from our story archive: http://s.si.edu/2fPDdF8
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This is unsettling. I think the first antibiotic, penicillin, was discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928, but it only became widely available after WWII. Before that, people died from relatively simple and curable (by antibiotics) diseases. I hope we are not returning to that era again.

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/01/a-superbug-resistant-to-26-antibiotics-killed-a-woman-itll-happen-again/513050/

https://www.rt.com/usa/373612-superbug-resistant-antibiotics-kills/

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-38609553

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Very interesting if the prediction turns out to be correct.

h/t +John Baez
Red nova

A "red nova" due to two stars merging might take place in 2022, and would likely be visible from Earth. (Alas, the linked article illustrates this with a picture of two merging bluish stars.)

The stars have been observed orbiting each other with an exponentially increasing angular velocity over the last three years, and they are believed to already be surrounded by a shared envelope of gas. If they are seen merging, this will be the first case of such an event being predicted in advance, making it possible to study the pre-collision phase.

Thanks to +Peter da Silva

The full paper is here: http://www.calvin.edu/academic/phys/observatory/MergingStar/MolnarEtAl2017.pdf

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/01/colliding-stars-will-light-night-sky-2022

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Arnie shows how to take the high road. A very useful skill.

http://time.com/4625886/arnold-schwarzenegger-donald-trump-abraham-lincoln/

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I can't remember ever hearing of the Bismarck battleship, but this is a pretty epic story, how Bismarck was chased and eventually sunk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_battleship_Bismarck



h/t +Ron Lewenberg

http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-latest-activity/news/2016/december/12/161212-naval-pilot-who-crippled-the-bismarck-dies-aged-97

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Good article by Washington Post, and nice graphs.
There are several informative, beautiful maps here. My favorites are the railroad and waterway tonnage because they're a little different than the kind I see most often and the insight jumps right out. I used ot work in the power industry and could never find data to map the whole power grid. I want to know how they got it!

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/national/maps-of-american-infrastrucure/

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Sad to see people celebrating fires in Israel.

h/t +Michael Safyan​
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