Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Spring Arbor of Kinston
4 followers
4 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Back in 1895, the breathtaking Blue Ridge Mountains, a comfortable climate and low land prices inspired the Vanderbilts to buy up 125,000 acres of North Carolina wilderness and build the Biltmore House, the largest estate in the U.S. The same factors that attracted this wealthy family continue to make North Carolina popular among retirees and second-home buyers today. But the Tar Heel State offers a little bit of everything, geographically and culturally. Retirees who prefer to live by the sea can find 300 miles of barrier island beaches, two national seashores and idyllic villages in the state’s eastern region. North Carolina also has some great college towns, including Chapel Hill, Davidson, and Durham. And dynamic city living can be found in fast-growing Charlotte, which has been undergoing a restaurant renaissance, and the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill-Cary vicinity, dubbed the “Research Triangle” due to its high density of high tech companies. For anyone on a fixed budget, living costs in North Carolina can be fairly friendly. Overall, the state is 3.7% cheaper than the national average. State income taxes are also to 5.8% flat tax. For more information on senior living in Greensboro, NC with levels of care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive marketwatch.com

Post has attachment
When the time comes to pick a place to retire, you want to make it a good one. After all, retirement is the prize at the end of a lot of long years of hard work. So what are the factors that go into picking that magical place? The perfect place will be a little different for everyone depending on finances, family and, of course, preferences. But for the most common factors – cost of living, safety, healthcare, activities and climate – Virginia comes out on top time and again. BankRate.com, a financial analysis website, recently published their list of the 10 Best States for Retire, ranking Virginia as #5 in the nation. We did a little more digging to find out what particular cities and towns have been recognized as top spots…and here’s what we found. Keep in mind, these aren’t in any particular order as they have all been recognized by various organizations and publications, but not analyzed side-by-side. Richmond Bloomberg Business ranked Richmond as one of the most affordable cities in which to retire. With beautiful neighborhoods and an abundance of cultural attractions like art museums, opera, theater and ballet, Richmond has no shortage of activities, Add to that a rich history, beautiful parks and good healthcare, and Richmond is a prime place to spend your golden years. Whether you’re looking to be closer to the grandkids or just want a certain lifestyle, Virginia has more than enough options. If you’re retired, or thinking about retiring soon, and would like more information on senior living with levels of care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive onlyinyourstate.com

Post has attachment
If you're an empty nester who's getting older, you may like the idea of downsizing. But if you don’t fancy moving into the sub-400-square-foot residences espoused by the tiny house movement, fear not; there are other options, including senior living communities with levels of care. These retirement enclaves are for folks in and approaching their sunset years who might be looking for some supportive services such as meals, transportation, and housekeeping, but who don’t need the level of care associated with assisted living facilities or nursing homes. If this sounds like your ticket to enjoying the good life in retirement, there can be a lot to think about when it comes to choosing a community. It can be overwhelming.  More Friends, Less Housework The main drivers for those considering retirement communities are socialization and simplifying their lifestyle. Even if their house is paid off, people often want to downsize from a traditional home with more bedrooms and bathrooms than they need. And they don’t want to have to deal with all the maintenance those dwellings often entail, not to mention going up and down stairs. But it’s important not to make decisions about such major life changes too quickly. Conversation Starter? The retirement housing conversation can be a good time to start considering options for later when retirees aren’t as mobile and may need additional care. In the case of a surviving spouse, take three to six months to let your emotions settle and figure out what you want to prioritize for the rest of your life. Really identify what those key priorities are. Some communities are organized around specific interests such as golf or art, or they may cater to a specific ethnic group. Some retirees have children in multiple cities, so deciding on location is also an important factor. Location and Lifestyle With all the services senior living communities can offer, some can get pricey. However, some may offer surprisingly good value and might actually be better economic alternatives when compared to regular apartments in certain high-rent markets in major metropolitan areas. That’s a good thing, as these are mostly private pay facilities. Take a Test Drive In addition to touring lots of communities, visit during mealtimes to not only sample the food, but also see the population together and explore whether the vibe feels right. And for those who have found their social circle shrinking as they age, retirement communities can make it easier to start making friends again. Senior living brings people back together. It really does foster those relationships. For more information on senior living, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive tickertape.tdameritrade.com

Post has attachment
Rumor has it that assisted living communities are not affordable. Read on, and you may be surprised. When people begin looking into assisted living options, they assume that they won't be able to afford a quality assisted living community. However, after researching and learning about the costs, they learn that assisted living can be affordable. If you are reading this article, you may be considering an assisted living facility for yourself or for your loved one. Here are some areas to consider as you research your options. Working with Marketing, Sales Directors First, schedule an in-person meeting with the director of marketing/sales. Websites are sometimes limited and may not paint a clear picture of actual costs. Many assisted living communities are managed by a company that oversees other communities across the United States. Ask which amenities and services are offered at the location you are considering. A good marketing director will take the time to help you analyze your current spending and financial situation, and how it compares to their community. You might be surprised what you really spend when living on your own. Don’t be afraid to be upfront about properties you owned, savings and any insurances policies that may help meet your care needs. The marketing director wants you to be successful, as their goal is for your loved one to live in the community long-term. If you can’t afford it, a good marketing director will be upfront and honest with you. What to Consider? Many assisted living communities will present you with a base rate, comprised of different care levels. Watch for à la carte fees, as these could increase the cost. Clarify what the base rate really means and ask the facility what would cause an increase in your rent. Some facilities have a mandatory rate increase every year. Make sure you understand what this entails. Base rates typically do not cover additional care needs, such as medication management or bathing. Make sure you ask about their process in identifying when you or your loved one may need to advance to the next care level. Ask that they put everything in writing so you can go home and discuss what you learned with your family. In addition, be sure to inquire about any discounts that may apply. Many assisted living communities have move in specials or are aware of outside discounts, like for veterans. One of the most essential questions to ask, as well as one of the most difficult, is what happens when your loved one runs out of private pay funds. If your loved one can only afford assisted living for a year or two, be transparent with the facility. Moving into an assisted living facility can be feel overwhelming at first. While you are considering your options, ask if you can participate in their activities or enjoy a meal in their dining room. The quality and level of care should be the number one priority during your search. At the same time, you want to make sure the community feels like home, so you feel welcome to take advantage of all assisted living has to offer! For more information, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive flagstaffbusinessnews.com

Post has attachment
Once you retire, you're free to head to the beach or golf course. In some cases, you can even dramatically reduce your cost of living or improve your quality of life with a single move. But you want to make sure that a retirement spot will continue to meet your needs as you age. Here are 10 tips for finding your ideal retirement spot: Seek lower costs. If you can sell your house in an expensive city and move to a place where housing costs significantly less, you can use that influx of cash to help fund your retirement years. If the cost of living is lower, it can certainly let your retirement nest egg last a little longer. Look for great amenities. Think about how you want to spend your retirement years, and make sure your retirement spot has the resources to allow you to do that. Look for golf courses, pools, fitness centers, parks or other amenities you would like to use. If you want to be pursuing your education, you might be looking for a college or other learning venues. If there are travel options you want to pursue, you are going to need to be near an airport or a train station. Health care options are essential. Make sure any community you are considering has adequate medical facilities and doctors that are taking on new patients. If you have any ongoing medical condition, or propensity for a specific illness runs in your family, it can be useful to retire near medical professionals who specialize in treating it. Calculate the tax impact. Taxes vary considerably by state, and you can often reduce your costs considerably by moving to a low-tax place. Take a look at how the state taxes pensions, Social Security and earned income, and also consider the sales tax, property tax and any special tax perks available for senior citizens. It's also important to realize that taxes pay for services, and there may be less help available to senior citizens in low-tax areas. Aim for proximity to family and friends. Many people want to retire near their children and grandchildren. Family and friends can enrich your life in retirement and provide significant (and often free) help when you need it most. "If somebody has lived in the same place their whole life and that's where their social network is and where the people they depend on are, then it's much harder to pick up and build a new network of support where you don't know anybody and you have to start from scratch. If you do move to a new community away from your support system, you will need to create a new circle of friends. An activity like golf or bridge will get [you] into another social network. Job opportunities. Americans are increasingly planning to work during the traditional retirement years. If a retirement career is part of your plan, you may want to line up a job opportunity before you make a move. A place that will enable you to do what you want to do with your post-retirement work career is very important. Some people have very portable skills where they could practice anywhere, while some people are more place-dependent. Transportation options. Many seniors reach a point when they can't or no longer want to drive. Some cities have public transportation systems that give discounts or are even free for senior citizens, or low-cost van or cab services that will help seniors get to doctor's appointments. Better weather. Some people seek retirement spots with warm weather so they can avoid winter, but you might find that you miss the change of seasons or that warm weather comes with its own challenges. Test it out first. One way to be more certain that a retirement spot will be a good fit is to test it out by renting. When you first move to a place, it might seem wonderful, but once you have tried living in it, you might find that it doesn't really suit your needs. There's nothing like actually living in a place to know all its little eccentricities and ins and outs. For more information contact Spring Arbor. money.usnews.com

Post has attachment
As family members come to discover that a parent has dementia (possibly Alzheimer’s), many conversations ensue about the “what ifs.” “What if she lives longer than Dad does – what will we do?” “If it is Alzheimer’s – what steps will we take for care?” “What will we do when Dad can no longer manage as her “caregiver?” “How will we know when it is time to move her to assisted living?” When assisted living is the direction a caregiver or family is considering, it is important to understand the options. There are medium to large assisted living facilities that come with many benefits – activities, socialization, three meals a day, housekeeping and laundry services, medication management if needed, transportation for doctor appointments, church, outings, and grocery and drug stores. How Will We Know it is Time? As it happens, the answer to this question has many factors. Any one of the factors, or a combination of them, can put the process of moving to assisted living in motion. The factors can fall into one of four categories—safety, general health and well-being, behavior, and caregiver burden. Let’s take a look at them. Factors to Help You Decide Safety Of all considerations, safety is first. Your loved one must be safe in his or her environment. Have they wandered? If it has happened once, it is likely to happen again. Are they a fall risk? A fall can change everything, and frequently precipitates a move to assisted living. Are there stairs in the home that are becoming too difficult or unsafe? Would it be safer for them with one-level living, staff to monitor their whereabouts, and activities to keep them occupied? General Health and Well-Being How is their physical health? Do they have other health issues or a chronic illness? Are they able to get daily exercise? Have you noticed a weight change? What is their ability to manage their own activities of daily living (ADLs)? ADLs include eating, bathing, dressing, toileting, transferring (walking) and continence. Are they socially engaged, or are they becoming more socially isolated? Do they see friends or family on regular basis? Have they given up driving, or should they? Behavior Are they experiencing more forgetfulness, confusion, episodes of aggression, sundowning, or combativeness? Is their behavior becoming difficult to manage? Caregiver Burden If you are the caregiver, are you able to get rest? Is the person with Alzheimer’s keeping you up at night? Are you able to get respite from caregiving? Is the rest of your family feeling ignored? What support system do you have? What about resources? Are you continuing to work? Is there adequate income? Is caregiving just too much? Would moving your loved one to assisted living give you time needed for family or work? When the Decision is Yours to Make If this decision is yours alone to make, are you ready to move your loved one to an assisted living facility? If you are finding it difficult to make this decision, many resources are available. Tour some facilities and talk to the staff. Reach out to your local Area Agency on Aging or Adult and Aging Services. An Aging Life Care Specialist is also available to discuss this option, as well as others. Finally, other caregivers are travelling the same journey and understand. For more information on assisted living and dementia care contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive brightfocus.org

Post has attachment
When you reach a certain age and you are beginning to think about downsizing, it is likely that you’ll have some doubts. In fact, there can be quite a few worries when thinking about downsizing. From losing space, to having your family to stay for holiday weekends, to feeling like your home defines you, there are a lot of things to think when thinking about downsizing. But really, you shouldn't worry - it doesn’t need to be an identity crisis. Here is the ultimate list of why downsizing is, actually, a great idea. If you're about to go through with it, or are in the middle of doing so, this is why you should be happy at the prospect. You'll have less space to clean. And tidy. Does this have a downside? It's more cost-effective. You might not have fewer bills - because you'll still, presumably, want the same services from your home - but it's likely they will be reduced, because in turn, you have reduced the size of your living accommodation. With the size comes the added bonus of not having any space. There's no extra space for unwanted guests, and them turning up every weekend when you'd rather they weren't there. And, there is no space for unwanted junk. Just think of the money you can save - and invest. Selling your old house could generate a whole wealth of income that you weren't expecting. There's no expectation for you to be the host. Pained at the thought of hosting everyone and their dog during holidays? When you've downsized, you needn't worry. Someone else can do the work, and you won’t be left out of the festivities. You have the opportunity to make a new home your own. Think of it as starting from the beginning: you can choose the location anew, the size, the everything. Added to that, you can make your new home age-appropriate. Not enjoying walking up and down the stairs every day? Get an apartment on the first floor. Want a swimming pool for water aerobics without the gym fee? Check out apartment communities with those luxuries. See, not scary at all. For more information on senior living communities in Greensboro, NC  contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive The Telegraph

Post has attachment
The decision to help an aging adult move out of a current home is a complex one -- both emotionally and practically. Above all, you want the person to be safe and well. How can you all feel more confident about whether circumstances suggest that your loved one should no longer be living alone? Although every situation is different, looking at the following 11 signs will give you valuable information to help make the decision. 1. Big-picture signs it might be time for assisted living Keep the big red flags in mind. Certain situations make it more obvious that it's wise to start thinking about alternate living arrangements. Look for: * Recent accidents or close calls. Did your loved one take a fall, have a medical scare, or get in a fender bender (or worse)? Who responded and how long did it take? Accidents do happen, but as people get older, the odds rise of them happening again. * A slow recovery. How did the person you're caring for weather the most recent illness (for example, a flu or bad cold)? Was he or she able and willing to seek medical care when needed, or did last winter's cold develop into untreated bronchitis? * A chronic health condition that's worsening. Progressive problems such as COPD, dementia, and congestive heart failure can decline gradually or precipitously, but either way, their presence means your loved one will increasingly need help. * Increasing difficulty managing the activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). ADLs and IADLs are the skills needed to live independently -- dressing, shopping, cooking, doing laundry, managing medications, and so on. Doctors, social workers, and other geriatric experts evaluate them as part of a functional assessment, which is one way to get an expert's view of the situation. Difficulties with ADLs and IADLs can sometimes be remedied by bringing in more in-home help. 2. Up-close signs it might be time for assisted living Give your loved one a big hug. Clues aren't always visible from a distance; especially when you don't see the person every day, you might learn more through touch. Look for: * Noticeable weight loss. Does the person feel thinner? Are clothes loose, or has he added notches to his belt? Many conditions, from depression to cancer, can cause weight loss. A person who is having trouble getting out to shop or remembering how to cook (or to eat) can lose weight; check the fridge and watch meal-prep skills. * Seeming more frail. Do you feel anything "different" about the person's strength and stature when you hug? Can your loved one rise easily from a chair? Does she or he seem unsteady or unable to balance? Compare these observations to the last time you were together. * Noticeable weight gain. Common causes include an injury slowing the person down, diabetes, and dementia (when someone doesn't remember eating, he or she may indulge in meals and snacks all day long). Someone with money troubles may choose fewer fresh foods and more packaged goods or dried pasta and bread. * Strange body odor. Unfortunately, a close hug can also reveal changes in personal hygiene habits. Causes range from memory trouble to depression to other physical ailments. * Changes in appearance. Does the person's hair and makeup look all right? Are clothes clean? Someone known for crisply ironed shirts who's now in a stained sweatshirt may lack the dexterity for buttons or may have lost the strength for managing an ironing board and iron. A formerly clean-shaven man with an unkempt beard may be forgetting to shave (or forgetting how to shave). 3. Social signs it might be time for assisted living Think realistically about the person's social connections. Social circles tend to shrink with age, which can have health and safety implications. Look for: * Signs of active friendships. Does your loved one still get together for lunches or outings with friends or visits with neighbors, or participate in religious activities or other group events? Does he or she talk about others or keep a calendar of appointments? Lack of companionship is associated with depression and heart problems in older adults. If friends have died or moved away, moving to a place where other people are around could be lifesaving. * Signs that your loved one has cut back on activities and interests. Is a hobby area abandoned? Has a club membership been given up? A library card gone unused? There are many reasons people cut back, but dropping out of everything and showing interest in almost nothing is a red flag for depression. * Days spent without leaving the house. This sometimes happens because the person can no longer drive or is afraid to take public transportation alone and lacks a companion to come along. While many older adults fear being "locked away" in a retirement home, many such facilities offer regular outings that may keep them more mobile and active, not less. * Someone who checks in on a regular basis. If not you or another family member, who does this? Is your loved one willing to consider a home-safety alarm system, a personal alarm system, or a daily calling service? * A plan for a worst-case scenario. If there's a fire, earthquake, flood, or other disaster, is someone on standby to assist? Does your loved one understand the plan? 4. Money signs it might be time for assisted living Riffle through the mail. Your loved one's mail can offer an often-overlooked clue to how he or she is managing money, a common early warning sign of cognitive trouble. Look for: * Snowdrifts of mail in various places. Finding lots of mail scattered around raises concern about how bills, insurance, and other matters are being managed. (Piles of mail are also a potential tripping hazard.) * Unopened personal mail. Everybody skips junk mail, but few of us can ignore a good old-fashioned, hand-addressed letter. * Unopened bills. This can indicate that your loved one is having difficulty managing finances -- one of the most common first signs of dementia. * Letters from banks, creditors, or insurers. Routine business letters aren't worrisome. But it's alarming if they're referring to overdue payments, overdrawn balances, recent accidents, or other concerning events. * Thank-you messages from charities. Older adults are often vulnerable to scammers. Even those who have always been fiscally prudent are vulnerable if they're having trouble with thinking skills (a common sign of Alzheimer's disease). Some charities hit up givers over and over, and your loved one may not remember having donating the first time. * Lots of crisp, unread magazines. The person may unknowingly have repeat-renewal subscriptions he or she doesn't need. 5. Driving signs it might be time for assisted living Take a drive -- with your loved one behind the wheel, if he or she is still driving. Living independently in our culture often depends on the ability to drive (or the arrangement of alternate transportation options). Look for: * Nicks or dents on the car. Notice the car body as you get in and out. Damage marks can be signs of careless driving. * Whether the person promptly fastens his or her seatbelt. Even people with mild dementia usually follow the rote basics of driving. It's worrisome if he or she is forgetting this step. * "Tension, preoccupation, or being easily distracted. The person may turn off the radio, for example, or be unwilling to engage in conversation while driving. He or she may avoid certain routes, highway driving, or driving at night and in rain -- a safe kind of self-policing but also signals of changing ability. * Signs of dangerous driving. People whose driving ability is impaired are more likely to tailgate, drift from their lane, go below the speed limit, react slowly to lights or other cars, and mix up gas and brake pedals. See 8 ways to assess someone's driving. * Warning lights. Check out the dashboard as you ride along. Does the car have sufficient oil, gas, antifreeze, windshield-wiper fluid? 6. Kitchen signs it might be signs for assisted living Go through the kitchen, from fridge to cupboards to oven. Because people spend so much time in this room, you can learn a lot. Look for: * Stale or expired foods. We all buy more than we need. Look for signs that food is not only old but that this is unnoticed -- mold, sour milk that's still used, or expiration dates well past due, for example. * Multiples of the same item. Ten bottles of ketchup? More cereal than can be eaten in a year? Multiples often reveal that the shopper can't remember from one store trip to the next what's in stock at home. * A freezer full of TV dinners. Your loved one may buy them for convenience sake, but frozen dinners tend not to make healthy diet. If there's not much fresh food in the house (because it's too hard to for the person to procure or cook), your loved one might be ready to have help with meal prep or delivery services. * Broken appliances. Check them all: microwave, coffeemaker, toaster, washer, and dryer -- any device you know your loved one uses (or used to use) routinely. * Signs of fire. Are stove knobs charred? Pot bottoms singed badly (or thrown out)? Do any potholders have burned edges? Also look for a discharged fire extinguisher, smoke detectors that have been disassembled, or boxes of baking soda near the stove. Accidents happen; ask for the story behind what you see. Accidental fires are a common home danger for older adults. * Increased use of takeout or simpler cooking. A change in physical or mental abilities might explain a downshift to simpler recipes or food choices. 7. Around-the-house signs it might be time for assisted living Look around the living areas. Sometimes the most obvious sign is hard to see because we become so used to it. Look for: * Lots of clutter. An inability to throw anything away may be a sign of a neurological or physical issue. Obviously it's more worrisome in a neatnik than in a chronic slob. Papers or pet toys all over the floor represent a tripping hazard. * Signs of lax housekeeping. Spills that haven't been cleaned up are a common sign of dementia -- the person lacks the follow-through to tidy. Keep an eye out for cobwebs, bathroom mold, thick dust, or other signs of slackness. Physical limitations can mean your loved one needs housekeeping help or a living situation where this is taken care of for him or her. * Bathroom grime and clutter. A common scenario: Your loved one makes an effort to tidy up living areas but overlooks the bathroom. Or the guest bath is clean, but not the one the person uses all the time (the one off a bedroom, for example). Here you may see a truer picture of how your loved one is keeping up. 8. Pet-care and plant-care signs it might be time for assisted living Be sure to check out how the other living things are faring. An ability to take care of pets and plants goes along with self-care. Look for: * Plants that are dying, dead, or just gone. Most of us have seen plants go brown sometimes. Keep an eye out for chronic neglect, especially in a former plant-lover's home. * Animals that don't seem well tended. Common problems: dogs with long nails, cat litter boxes that haven't been changed lately, or dead fish in the fish tank. Poor grooming, overfeeding, and underfeeding are other red flags. 9. Home-maintenance signs it might be time for assisted living Walk around the yard. Yard maintenance -- or lack of it -- can yield clues that your loved one isn't faring as well at home alone anymore. Look for: * Signs of neglect. Look for discolored siding or ceilings that might indicate a leak, gutters choked with leaves, broken windows or fences, dirty windows. * Newspapers in the bushes. Are papers being delivered but ignored? Sometimes people pick up those they can see on a driveway but not those that go off into the yard. * Mail piled up in the mailbox. Go out and check -- it's an indication that your loved one doesn't even retrieve it regularly. 10. Get help looking for signs it might be time for assisted living Get the input of others who know your loved one in order to collect a fuller picture of reality. Gently probing about what others think isn't nosy; you're being loving, concerned, and proactive. Look for: * Input from those in your loved one's circle. Talk to old friends and close relatives to get their sense of how the person is faring. Listen for stories that hint that the person doesn't get out much ("She doesn't come over anymore." "She quit book club."). Pay attention to comments that indicate ongoing concerns ("Has he had that heart test yet?" "We were worried the day the ambulance came."). * Medical insight. With appropriate permission, your loved one's primary doctor may share your concerns about his or her patient's safety at home -- or may be able to alleviate those concerns or suggest where to get a home assessment. * A second opinion. A social worker or professional geriatric care manager visits older adults' homes and does informal evaluations. While your loved one may initially resist the notion of a "total stranger" checking on them, try pitching it as a professional (and neutral) second opinion, or ask the doctor to "prescribe" it. Some people wind up sharing doubts or vulnerabilities with a sympathetic, experienced stranger that they're loathe to admit to their own children or family. 11. Caregivers' signs it might be time for assisted living Finally, realize that some of the information you collect is intangible -- it has to do with feelings and emotions, and the stress levels of everyone involved. Look for: * How you're doing. While this decision to remain in one's home is not primarily about you -- the son, daughter, grandchild, caregiver -- your own exhaustion can be a good gauge of a decline in older adults' ability to care for themselves. Keeping someone at home can require lots of hands-on support or care coordination, and this is time-consuming. If your loved one's need for care is just plain wearing you out, or if a spouse or children are feeling the collective strain of your caregiving activities, these are major signs that it's time to start looking at other options. * Your loved one's emotional state. Safety is crucial, of course, but so is emotional well-being. If someone living alone is riddled with anxieties or increasingly lonely, then that may tip the scales toward a move not solely based on health and safety reasons. If your loved one has a full life, a close neighborhood and community connections, and seems to be thriving, it's worth exploring as many in-home care options as possible before raising stress levels by pressing a move from a beloved home. If, on the other hand, your loved one is showing signs that living alone is a strain, it may be time for a talk. Broach the subject of where to live in a neutral way and you may find that your loved one harbors the same fears for current and future safety and security that you do. Find out what your loved one fears most about moving and about staying before launching into your own worries and what you think ought to be done. For more information on assisted living, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive caring.com

Post has attachment
When a loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, it's normal for the first reaction to be: "We'll never put mom in a nursing home. We're going to take care of her at home." That's an admirable sentiment, but it can become an unrealistic one. No matter how great your determination or how broad your shoulders, the demands of around-the-clock care for someone with advancing dementia may eventually become more than you can provide at home. That's when families confront one of the hardest decisions they'll ever make. Is it time to move mom into assisted living? It's almost always an emotional decision. There's some level of emotion tied to it that can cloud the decision. Older adults who are on five or more medications — a practice known as "polypharmacy" — may experience side effects or bad interactions that increase their risk of cognitive impairment. Families struggle with that dilemma on a daily basis. As families face this agonizing decision, families should go through a careful analysis of what's best for all involved, recognizing that's never an easy process. It's important for families to know there are resources available and that in some cases, placement may be the safest and most reasonable option for their loved one. But it's hard. Really, really hard. It's a very emotional decision-making process that you have to try to put objectivity around, and that's very challenging for a family. Part of the emotional burden is the perception of what it means to "put mom in a nursing home." In reality, there are many other options. One of the issues with people at this stage in their life, they fear the term 'nursing home. So there has been an effort to educate people on the term 'community living.'' Community living can encompass everything from a "55 and over" residential setting to assisted living to a memory care community. Nursing care is available for those who need it. But experts say if you understand the options and do some planning in advance, it's possible for your loved one to be in the appropriate setting at every stage of the disease without ever requiring placement in a nursing home. Yet even with so many options now available, the emotional burden often causes families to put off the decision. Experts say it's common for families to wait far too long to move someone with Alzheimer's into assisted care, when both the patient and the family would have benefited from that move having come sooner. If people do wait it's hard to say whether their situation would have been improved. However, families should try to consider the question early on, before they are thrown into crisis. If you wait, your decision becomes much more rushed and pressured. If you're making decision quickly because of a crisis, it's a lot more difficult. What are the warning signs that it may be time to consider placement? It could be that the loved one is losing weight, or is dehydrated, or not cooking anymore. It could be acts of neglect, such as not feeding a pet, or letting bills go unpaid, or a "close call," such as leaving the stove on and unattended. There are so many factors in making this decision. For every family it's different, and it's about how their loved one is progressing. There's a very long list of signs you can look at. For more information on assisted living and memory care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive nj.com

Post has attachment
For years, we’ve read that Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of dementia. That’s not entirely true. The leading cause is “caregiver dementia,” which strikes an estimated 100 million overwhelmed and stressed-out caregivers worldwide. The term was used initially in the 1980s, and while not an official medical diagnosis, it includes symptoms such as disorientation, forgetfulness and depression. Stressful conditions produce high levels of the hormone cortisol, which, over time, may contribute to memory loss. Think about it: You’re working long hours, you see no end in sight and you’re exhausted. Who can think straight under those conditions? A 2010 Utah study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society of 1,221 couples tracked for 12 years found that seniors caring for a husband or wife with dementia had six times the risk of getting dementia as members of the general population. Surprisingly, men were most susceptible, facing double that risk. Some Dementias Are Reversible Even undiagnosed urinary tract infections may lead to sudden behavior changes such as confusion, agitation, withdrawal or delirium. Medicines will also have varying effects, as we grow older. As we age, our liver and kidneys don’t work as efficiently resulting in a buildup over time of unprocessed medications. These chemicals become toxic leading to dementia symptoms or delirium. Which leaves us with caregiver dementia. Until caregivers are able to take proactive steps to overcome feelings of hopelessness resulting from the stress of caring for another person, they’ll continue to endure embarrassing and even scary moments. Caregivers Will Overcome The onset of caregiver dementia is real and it strikes primary caregivers. Those who heed the call and take action will survive. But there’s more to being a caregiver than just surviving. We need to apply both legs of our “caring” and “giving” nature to overcome and thrive. We start with a break. As little as a five-minute respite can make all the difference. Ultimately, we’ll need help. Today, caregivers have a variety of options to choose from, including in-home and adult day care, residential care and assisted living. The only other cure is to stop caregiving, and this is not an option for many. For more information on caring for those with Alzheimer's or Dementia, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive US News - Health
Wait while more posts are being loaded