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Reliquary Bust of Saint Yrieix.
Date: ca. 1220–40, with later grill
Geography: Made in Limoges, France
Culture: French
Medium: Silver and gilded silver with rock crystal, gems, and glass.

More info from wiki -
Saint Aredius (c. 510–591), also known as Yrieix, was Abbot of Limoges and chancellor to Theudebert II, King of Austrasia in the 6th century. He founded the monastery of Attanum, and the various French communes called St. Yrieix are named after him.

Aredius was from a prominent Gallo-Roman family of Limoges. Early in his career he served as chancellor to Theudebert I, King of Austrasia. Nicetius bishop of Trier persuaded Aredius to leave the court. Upon the death of his father, Aredius returned to the Limousin to care for his mother. Entrusting to her the management of his estates, he lived as a hermit in a cave.

Recalled by his mother, he founded a monastery in his own house, which later became the site of the city of Saint Yrieix. He was a friend of Gregory of Tours, who says that the house followed the rule of Cassian and later incorporated some aspects of the rule of St. Basil. Aredius divided his time between agricultural labor and study. Every year he made a pilgrimage to Tours to celebrate the feast of St. Martin. He would also travel annually to the Holy Cross Abbey in Poitiers to visit Queen Radegund.

People in the area believed him to have the gift of healing. Gregory says they crowded to Aredius "like bees to a hive". On more than one occasion, he intervened with the Merovingian princes on behalf of the people regarding oppressive taxes.

He supported the cult of Saint Medard of Soissons and probably built the church in his honor at Excideuil. He was a friend of Gregory of Tours, and bequeathed some of his wealth to the church at Tours.

Legend
He was the son of Jocundus, a wealthy Roman. As a young boy he was sent to monastery at Vigeois to study. At the age of 14, he was sent to Metz, under Theudebert. He became the chancellor. Aredius left the court, where life was dissolute, to join Nicetius, of Trier. He converted to Christianity; when he was singing psalms, a dove came down from the sky and flew around him, Aredius tried to shoo it away, but this one was placed above his head. The dove remained with Aredius during thirty days. When his father died, he joined his mother Pelagia in a villa in Attanum (Attane).
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Famously, there have been hundreds of pairs of shoes found at the Roman fort of Vindolanda on the northern extreme of Roman Britain. But this freshly unearthed full set of iron horseshoes is one of a kind.
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Most mainstream paleontologists and geologists place dinosaurs on earth’s timeline at around 220 million and 65 million years ago, during the Mesozoic Era. Homo sapiens on the other hand, do not appear in the record until about 200,000 years ago - in the Middle Pleistocene, Middle Paleolithic (Eurasia), or Middle Stone Age (Africa). There are, however, occasional claims of evidence that dinosaurs and humans were not so temporally distant from each other, and in fact coexisted at one time. The bizarre Acámbaro figures are an example of this phenomenon.
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Barber surgeon’s, double sided carved and painted wooden plaque with images of Death and Time and scene of blood letting, 1680-1830. Graduated grey background. The Wellcome Collection.
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FOOT JAR - Peru, Ica Valley,
2nd–1st century BCE
(VIA THE MET)


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Unusual Celtic helmet, 3rd Century BC

on display at the Celti Museum Manching in Bavaria.
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