Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Legal Action Center
19 followers -
Helping People Rebuild their Lives with Dignity
Helping People Rebuild their Lives with Dignity

19 followers
About
Legal Action Center's posts

Post has attachment
Have you heard? Legal Action Center is launching our new website today! Check it out for easy access to all our resources and information about LAC's legal services, policy advocacy, and technical assistance. You can also find out how to support our work and stay informed about our issues and events. www.lac.org

Post has attachment
Following the reintroduction of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, Legal Action Center (LAC) released a report urging policymakers to take steps to address the growing opioid and heroin epidemic through more effective use of medication-assisted treatment (MAT).
The report, “The Case for Expanding Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment to Address the Heroin and Opioid Epidemic,” outlines the health, justice, and economic advantages of medication-assisted treatment along with several policy recommendations for improving addiction treatment.
http://lac.org/improved-medication-assisted-treatment-policy-aid-epidemic-20-million-americans-untreated-addiction/

Post has attachment
The Attorney General’s Health Care Bureau’s investigation found that Excellus denied claims for inpatient substance use disorder treatment seven times as often as claims for inpatient medical care. Excellus violated state and federal parity laws that require insurers that provide mental health and substance use disorder benefits to provide them equally—or at parity—with other medical and surgical benefits. According to the Attorney General’s press release, “many of Excellus’s denials were the result of its requirement that members fail outpatient treatment multiple times” before inpatient services would be covered. These “fail twice” policies are harmful to patients. They also violate New York guidelines and, in this case, parity laws since the requirements were not applied to other medical services.
http://lac.org/ny-attorney-general-finds-excellus-denied-claims-for-addiction-services-at-seven-times-the-rate-of-other-services-violating-parity-law/

Post has attachment
LAC applauds Governor Christie for establishing today the Facing Addiction Task Force, a 12-member team of leaders and experts from inside and outside of government to fight drug addiction through treatment and prevention; for his continued recognition that addiction is a disease, one that affects all demographic groups; and for his focus on fighting the stigma that is so strongly associated with this disease. 
#beaface

Post has attachment
"Want proof that "ban the box" policies help people with criminal records secure good jobs while helping employers hire good workers? You'll find it in Durham, North Carolina, where government hiring of people with records has increased dramatically since the city and county removed questions about prior convictions from job applications..."

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Legal Action Center’s Legal Director, Sally Friedman, was recently quoted in a Forbes article, “How a Criminal Background Check can Cost You the Job.” The article highlights two of the Center’s current lawsuits against a background screener and employer for violations of the laws governing background checks. The article also includes suggestions of what to do if you are the victim of an inaccurate commercial background check. Check out the article here: http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2014/09/19/how-a-criminal-background-check-can-cost-you-the-job/

Post has attachment
Yesterday September 22, 2014, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo launched “Combat Heroin,” a campaign designed to inform and educate New Yorkers about the risks of heroin and prescription opioid use, the signs of addiction, and the resources available to help.

“Heroin and opioid addiction has impacted families in every corner of our state and stolen the lives of too many New Yorkers – but today we’re taking another step forward in the fight against this serious epidemic,” Governor Cuomo said. “The Combat Heroin campaign will get the word out about the dangers of this illegal drug use, as well as the treatment and support services that are available to those who need help. Just like this year’s new law that expanded access to treatment and anti-overdose medication, this campaign is comprehensive and designed to save lives. I urge anyone who knows someone in need of help to reach out today.”

Heroin and opioid abuse have become an alarming problem in communities across New York State and the nation. In 2013, there were 89,269 admissions for heroin and prescription opioid abuse treatment in New York State alone, an increase from 63,793 in 2004. During this same time period, New Yorkers ages 18 to 24 had the largest increase in such admissions. Nationally, nearly half a million people were reportedly abusing heroin or suffering from heroin dependence in 2012.

In June 2014, Governor Cuomo signed into law a legislative package to combat this epidemic. The package included insurance reforms, new models of care to divert people into community-based treatment and to support people after they have completed treatment, allowing parents to seek assessment of their children through the PINS diversion services, and expansion of opioid overdose training and increased availability to naloxone, a medication which reverses an opioid overdose.

Post has attachment
LAC's own Senior Staff Attorney, Monica Welby, will be discussing how to overcome legal barriers to employment as part of a training organized by the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agency (FPWA) for social and clinical service providers on "Challenges, Opportunities, and Resources to Gaining Employment while Living with HIV/AIDS." 

The training will take place at FPWA's offices at 281 Park Avenue South on Thursday, October 2 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

To register, click here: http://salsa.wiredforchange.com/o/6584/p/salsa/event/common/public/?event_KEY=423405

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded