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The Center for Parenting Education
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Does the sight and sound of your toddler having a melt down make you want to scream? Temper tantrums are a "normal" part of toddlerhood, so what's a parent to do? Learn more: http://ow.ly/s03s30fXwe2
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When kids are upset, parents are often quick to step in and try to make it better, taking on problems that their children really ought be handling on their own. Learn how to decide whose problem it is. http://ow.ly/R1V530bqHw2
The Skill of Problem Exploration
The Skill of Problem Exploration
centerforparentingeducation.org
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Parents often feel pressure to keep their kids constantly entertained. When little Jimmy complains, "I'm bored!", parents often jump into action mode. Instead, it can be good for kids to experience a bit of boredom and use it as an opportunity to be creative. Read more: http://ow.ly/asYq30cI1Te
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In honor of International Friendship Day, read a book with your child about being a good friend. Learning social skills is a buffer against being a bully or a victim later in life. See our list of recommended children's books on this topic: http://ow.ly/sN7K30gDY3R
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When you talk, read, and sing with a child in sensitive, loving, and responsive ways, you build their brain and help them develop the social-emotional skills they need to succeed in school and life.

Check out these videos with tips for understanding and managing a child’s behavior, and taking care of yourself during the challenging moments, too!

Thanks to our friends at Baby Talk for making us aware of this resource. It's really worth your time to take a look: http://ow.ly/KZyB30fp04e
Talking Is Teaching
Talking Is Teaching
talkingisteaching.org
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Help preschoolers take responsibility for their behavior by pointing out the connection between what they did and the resulting consequence. For example, ask him, "What happened BEFORE the coach took you out of the game?" Learn more about guiding your child to realize his part in what happens to him - both those things that turn out how he wanted them to and those that don't: http://ow.ly/70V9309rhf1
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A mom of two young children admitted to her mom that she sometimes dreaded long days at home with her kids. She was shocked and relieved when her mother shared that she had felt that way at times too when she was raising her children. The young mom said she never knew that and certainly never felt anything but love from her mom.

Parenting is hard and it is normal to sometimes feel trapped by all the responsibilities. It doesn't mean you are not a good parent or that you do not love your child.
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"Your not the boss of me! If you are going to tell me what to do, I'm going to tell you what to do." That is such a refrain from 4-year-olds, who care a lot about exerting their power, especially within the family. Learn more about typical behavior by age: http://ow.ly/uRcH30eOiPD
Child Development by Age
Child Development by Age
centerforparentingeducation.org
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Does your little one try to do everything his big brother or sister does? This can be an opportunity for you to encourage your older one to be on his "best" behavior.

One mom encouraged her son to be kind to his little sister by saying, "You're doing such a good job in showing Sara how we treat other people in our family. She really looks up to you."

It's a win-win-win. You win with less fighting, Sara learns good behavior, and the big brother feels special and is motivated to be nice to his sister.

Learn more about the sibling relationship: http://ow.ly/u26K30eKLrK
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Parenting Principle of Complaining: Parents benefit by knowing it is perfectly okay and even beneficial as a release to complain about the job of parenting. It is freeing to other parents as well who may have thought that complaining should not occur, or that complaining means you wish you weren't a parent. It just means you have the right to verbalize your dissatisfaction with certain parts of the job. By Diane Wagenhals
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