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Southern Sprinkler Systems, LLC
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How do you convert "inches of water" to the flow of water that comes out of your hose?

1. Multiply the number of inches of water you need by 0.6. The result is the number of gallons per square foot you need to apply.

2. Multiply those "gallons per square foot" by the square footage of your garden to determine how many gallons you need to apply.

3. Compensate for the watering system's inefficiency by dividing the gallons needed by 0.85 for drip, or 0.70 for sprinkler.

Now, to figure out how long to run the hose, put the hose into an empty 1-gallon jug and time how long it takes to fill the jug. If it fills in 30 seconds, for example, you have a flow of 2 gallons per minute. If it takes a minute, it flows at 1 gallon a minute (and so on).

Divide the total number of gallons your garden needs by the gallon-per-minute rate. That's how many minutes you have to leave your water on. Don't be surprised if your calculations show that it will take as long as 2 to 3 hours to supply the water your garden needs.
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Plants watered with drip systems grow more quickly and are more productive, because they have all the water they need and their growth isn’t slowed by water stress. (This is especially true when drip irrigation is used in conjunction with mulch.) Also, plants watered by drip irrigation don’t end up with wet foliage from a sprinkler spray, and that can help prevent some foliage diseases such as powdery mildew.
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For busy gardeners, the main benefit of drip irrigation is the savings of both time and effort. Drip systems eliminate the need to drag around hoses and sprinklers. For systems that use a timer, gardeners need only spend a few seconds to turn the system on; the timer automatically turns it off
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Furthermore, since drip irrigation delivers water directly to the plants you want to grow, less is wasted on weeds. The soil surface between the plants also remains drier, which discourages weed seeds from sprouting.
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Almost no water is lost through surface runoff or evaporation, and soil particles have plenty of opportunity to absorb and hold water for plants. It also means very few nutrients leach down beyond the reach of plant roots.
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A drip irrigation system delivers water directly to the root zone of a plant, where it seeps slowly into the soil one drop at a time.

Drip irrigation, also known as trickle irrigation or micro irrigation or localized irrigation, is an irrigation method that saves water and fertilizer by allowing water to drip slowly to the roots of plants, either onto the soil surface or directly onto the root zone, through a network of valves, pipes, tubing, and emitters. It is done through narrow tubes that deliver water directly to the base of the plant.

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This is a plant with subtle beauty when used as a focal point or single specimen, but when used collectively as a group it is a cold knock out. Late in January the plants are covered in tiny lemon yellow blooms. Hardy in zones 7 - 9. Winter jasmine thrives in full sun with average soil. Grows to 15 feet in warm climates, in the North it tops out at 3 to 8 feet.
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This shrub is the old fashioned and unimproved variety. How refreshing! Of course this says nothing about its incredible fragrance that fills the garden as early as January! Cold hardy to zone 5, plant winter honeysuckle in full sun to partial shade. Grows 8 to 10 tall and up to 8 feet wide.
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Traditionally considered the belle of the Southern garden, new cultivars of this shrub have been created that are more cold tolerant. Some varieties of this evergreen shrub bloom in very early spring. Plant camellias in partial shade in an area that is protected from drying winds. They thrive in humus rich, well-drained soil. Hardy in zones 7 - 8.
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