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Travis Linton
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Just a wannabe Radio DJ and Critic.
Just a wannabe Radio DJ and Critic.

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Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Let's get wild, let's have fun, and let's put on a fun tune from New York thrash band Anthrax.

Anthrax was formed in Queens, New York City, on July 18, 1981 by guitarists Scott Ian and Dan Lilker. The band was named after the disease of the same name which Ian saw in a biology textbook, chosen because it sounded "sufficiently evil". Anthrax's initial line-up was completed by singer John Connelly, drummer Dave Weiss and bassist Paul Kahn. Kahn was briefly replaced by bassist Kenny Kushner before Lilker took over on bass and Greg Walls joined as lead guitarist. Weiss was then replaced early on by Greg D'Angelo, who was recommended to the band by Greg Walls. Scott Ian's younger brother Jason Rosenfeld was a temporary vocalist until Ian's former schoolmate Neil Turbin joined the band in late August 1982. The band recorded its first demo tape during this time. This line-up played regularly in the New York-New Jersey area over the next several months. Anthrax were also on the same bill as the up-and-coming Metallica for several shows in the spring of 1983. Guitarist Greg Walls left Anthrax that summer and was replaced by Bob Berry, who was recommended to Turbin by Rhett Forrester of Riot. Berry was in turn soon replaced by Dan Spitz, who was previously a member of the New Jersey thrash band Overkill. Drummer Charlie Benante replaced D'Angelo in September 1983 after a several-month courtship by Ian. By this time, Ian and Lilker had befriended New Jersey record store owner Jon Zazula, to whom they had given their demo tapes to critique. Zazula's new record label Megaforce Recordshad recently released Metallica's debut album Kill 'Em All to great success. In late 1983, Zazula agreed to sign Anthrax and the band recorded the "Soldiers of Metal" single, which was produced by Ross the Boss of Manowar.  Anthrax released their debut album Fistful of Metal in January 1984. However, tensions were building between Lilker and the rest of the band for various reasons and he was asked to leave before touring began. He would soon form the band Nuclear Assaultwith former Anthrax roadie John Connelly. Lilker was replaced by Benante's nephew and roadie Frank Bello. In August 1984, Neil Turbin and Anthrax went their separate ways after long standing personal issues.

In 1985, Joey Belladonna was chosen as the new vocalist. The Armed and Dangerous EP marked Belladonna's recording debut even though it featured two live tracks from 1984 and the two songs from the "Soldiers of Metal" single that all had Neil Turbin performing on them. Anthrax's second album Spreading the Disease was released in October 1985. With left over studio time from the sessions for the album Ian, Benante and former bandmate Dan Lilker collaborated with vocalist Billy Milanoand formed the side project Stormtroopers of Death and recorded the album Speak English or Die in three days, which was released in December 1985. The band's third studio album Among the Living was released in March 1987. It showcased the band's humorous, experimental side and began a lyrical trend focusing on movies, comic books and Stephen King novels. The album was dedicated to Cliff Burton's memory, as he had been killed a year prior in a freak bus crash. "I Am the Law" was issued as a single backed with "I'm the Man", a rap-metal hybrid. Anthrax further indulged its appreciation for rap by appearing on the title track of U.T.F.O.'s album, Lethal. 

Anthrax returned in 1988 with their fourth album State of Euphoria. The single "Antisocial", originally by French heavy-metal band Trust, became an MTV staple as part of the rotation on Headbangers Ball. In 1990 Anthrax released the more serious Persistence of Time, which surpassed State of Euphoria's success. The album was darker, more technical and more progressive than the band's previous work, striking a chord with metal fans wary of Anthrax's "silly" side. The most successful single from the album was a cover of Joe Jackson's "Got the Time", which Jackson said he enjoyed. In 1991, Anthrax collaborated with Public Enemy on a version of "Bring the Noise". This was a hit, and a successful tour with Public Enemy followed. In late 1992, singer Joey Belladonna was fired from Anthrax over creative and stylistic differences.

After firing Belladonna, the remaining members of Anthrax auditioned several vocalists including Mark Osegueda of Death Angel and Spike Xavier of Mind Over Four. However, Armored Saint vocalist John Bushwas the standout favorite and had in fact been floated as a potential replacement for Belladonna a few years earlier due to questions about his reliability stemming from drug and alcohol abuse. The band left Island Records to sign with Elektra, releasing Sound of White Noise in 1993. A change from Anthrax's earlier work, with a dark sound influenced by alternative rock, Sound of White Noise received mostly-positive reviews. This album demonstrated that Anthrax had fully shed its cartoonish persona in favor of mature, thoughtful songwriting, which began with Persistence of Time. After Sound of White Noise longtime guitarist Dan Spitz left the band to become a watchmaker, leaving Anthrax a quartet for two years. In 1995 Anthrax released their seventh studio album Stomp 442, on which Charlie Benante played most of the lead-guitar parts. Benante was assisted by Paul Crook, who later became the band's touring lead guitarist for several years, and Dimebag Darrell of Pantera. Because Elektra did not promote the album it was less commercially successful than its predecessor, and Anthrax severed its ties with the label.

The band signed with independent label Ignition Records, releasing Volume 8: The Threat Is Real in 1998. As on Stomp 442, Benante performed lead guitar parts along with Crook and Darrell. The album also features Pantera vocalist Phil Anselmomaking a guest vocal appearance. After the album's release the label went bankrupt, disrupting its distribution. Anthrax then signed with Beyond Records, who released the greatest-hits album Return of the Killer A's(1999), after which Beyond went out of business as well. During this period a two-vocalist tour with Belladonna and Bush was planned, but Belladonna decided not to participate at the last minute. Despite hardships and legal entanglements over album rights, Anthrax continued. In 2001 Rob Caggiano joined the band on lead guitar. During the 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States the band changed its website, providing information about the disease after people began searching "anthrax.com" on internet search engines. Amid a potential PRnightmare, Anthrax issued a press release on October 10, 2001 joking that the band's name would be changed to "something more friendly, like 'Basket Full of Puppies'." Anthrax dispelled any name-change rumors derived from the press release at the November 2001 New York Steel 9/11 benefit concert, when they took the stage in boiler suits with a different word on each one which ultimately read "We're not changing our name". Bello has stated they did so after receiving support from members of the NYPD and NYFD, who believed that changing the name of the band would send the wrong message. In 2003, the band signed to Sanctuary Records and released their ninth studio album We've Come for You All, praised by metal journalists as a return to form.

In April 2005, Anthrax announced that the "classic" lineup of Scott Ian, Charlie Benante, Dan Spitz, Joey Belladonna and Frank Bello would reform. At some shows on the following tour, they played Among the Living in its entirety. Although the lineup was expected to record a new album after the tour, in January 2007 Ian said that Belladonna had not agreed to a reunion. After that announcement it was uncertain if John Bush would return, since Bush said he was unready to re-commit to Anthrax. In December 2007 it was announced that the band's new vocalist would be Dan Nelson, formerly of Devilsize, and Rob Caggiano would return as lead guitarist. In May 2008, Anthrax played its first show in 19 months at Double Door in Chicago. Appearing before a sold-out audience with Nelson, the band played new material which was well received (despite equipment problems). In early 2009, Anthrax began a brief tour opening for Iron Maiden in South America. In July, band manager Izvor Zivkovic confirmed the departure of Dan Nelson due to illness. Nelson denied this, saying that he was fired. All subsequent performances were canceled except the August UK Sonisphere Festival, which featured John Bush on vocals. Due to fan response after his performance, a "Bring Back Bush" campaign began and was endorsed by Ian. Joey Belladonna returned to the band in early 2010 for the Sonisphere dates as well as committing to record a new studio album with the band. In June 2010 Anthrax, Metallica, Megadeth and Slayer performed on the same bill for the first time ever at seven Sonisphere shows. In June Anthrax released the single "Fight 'Em 'Til You Can't" from the then-upcoming new album on their website as a free download to thank fans for their patience in waiting several years for new material. Worship Music was released on September 13, 2011 and debuted at #12 on the Billboard Top 200 album charts, their highest chart position since Sound of White Noise in 1993. In January 2013, Anthrax announced that lead guitarist Rob Caggiano had left the band to join Volbeat. It was announced shortly afterwards that Jonathan Donais of Shadows Fall had been hired as the band's touring lead guitarist. Donais was confirmed as an official member in August of that year. In March, Anthrax released the Anthems EP featuring cover versions of 1970s rock songs as well as two new versions of the song "Crawl" from Worship Music. The band began 2016 with a short US tour with Lamb of God and released their eleventh studio album For All Kings on February 26, 2016. The album debuted on the Billboard200 charts at number 9, surpassing the number 12 debut of Worship Music. And they're still hard at it today.

Anthrax has a very well established legacy as one of the true pioneering bands of thrash metal, often referred to among what is known as the "Big Four" of Thrash, alongside Metallica, Megadeth, and Slayer. Ironically enough, of these four, Anthrax is the only band to have been formed in the East, rather than the Bay Area. But their fans still love their iconic approach to the genre, whether it's a more serious approach, or an approach that's all in good fun. It truly is a madhouse when Anthrax takes the stage.

Let's take a trip back to August, 1990. Off the album Persistence in Time, this is "Got the Time" as originally performed by Joe Jackson, and interpreted by Anthrax. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #Anthrax #PersistenceInTime #GotTheTime #JoeJackson #Metal #ThrashMetal

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Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Let's get wild, let's have fun, and let's put on a fun tune from New York thrash band Anthrax.

Anthrax was formed in Queens, New York City, on July 18, 1981 by guitarists Scott Ian and Dan Lilker. The band was named after the disease of the same name which Ian saw in a biology textbook, chosen because it sounded "sufficiently evil". Anthrax's initial line-up was completed by singer John Connelly, drummer Dave Weiss and bassist Paul Kahn. Kahn was briefly replaced by bassist Kenny Kushner before Lilker took over on bass and Greg Walls joined as lead guitarist. Weiss was then replaced early on by Greg D'Angelo, who was recommended to the band by Greg Walls. Scott Ian's younger brother Jason Rosenfeld was a temporary vocalist until Ian's former schoolmate Neil Turbin joined the band in late August 1982. The band recorded its first demo tape during this time. This line-up played regularly in the New York-New Jersey area over the next several months. Anthrax were also on the same bill as the up-and-coming Metallica for several shows in the spring of 1983. Guitarist Greg Walls left Anthrax that summer and was replaced by Bob Berry, who was recommended to Turbin by Rhett Forrester of Riot. Berry was in turn soon replaced by Dan Spitz, who was previously a member of the New Jersey thrash band Overkill. Drummer Charlie Benante replaced D'Angelo in September 1983 after a several-month courtship by Ian. By this time, Ian and Lilker had befriended New Jersey record store owner Jon Zazula, to whom they had given their demo tapes to critique. Zazula's new record label Megaforce Recordshad recently released Metallica's debut album Kill 'Em All to great success. In late 1983, Zazula agreed to sign Anthrax and the band recorded the "Soldiers of Metal" single, which was produced by Ross the Boss of Manowar.  Anthrax released their debut album Fistful of Metal in January 1984. However, tensions were building between Lilker and the rest of the band for various reasons and he was asked to leave before touring began. He would soon form the band Nuclear Assaultwith former Anthrax roadie John Connelly. Lilker was replaced by Benante's nephew and roadie Frank Bello. In August 1984, Neil Turbin and Anthrax went their separate ways after long standing personal issues.

In 1985, Joey Belladonna was chosen as the new vocalist. The Armed and Dangerous EP marked Belladonna's recording debut even though it featured two live tracks from 1984 and the two songs from the "Soldiers of Metal" single that all had Neil Turbin performing on them. Anthrax's second album Spreading the Disease was released in October 1985. With left over studio time from the sessions for the album Ian, Benante and former bandmate Dan Lilker collaborated with vocalist Billy Milanoand formed the side project Stormtroopers of Death and recorded the album Speak English or Die in three days, which was released in December 1985. The band's third studio album Among the Living was released in March 1987. It showcased the band's humorous, experimental side and began a lyrical trend focusing on movies, comic books and Stephen King novels. The album was dedicated to Cliff Burton's memory, as he had been killed a year prior in a freak bus crash. "I Am the Law" was issued as a single backed with "I'm the Man", a rap-metal hybrid. Anthrax further indulged its appreciation for rap by appearing on the title track of U.T.F.O.'s album, Lethal. 

Anthrax returned in 1988 with their fourth album State of Euphoria. The single "Antisocial", originally by French heavy-metal band Trust, became an MTV staple as part of the rotation on Headbangers Ball. In 1990 Anthrax released the more serious Persistence of Time, which surpassed State of Euphoria's success. The album was darker, more technical and more progressive than the band's previous work, striking a chord with metal fans wary of Anthrax's "silly" side. The most successful single from the album was a cover of Joe Jackson's "Got the Time", which Jackson said he enjoyed. In 1991, Anthrax collaborated with Public Enemy on a version of "Bring the Noise". This was a hit, and a successful tour with Public Enemy followed. In late 1992, singer Joey Belladonna was fired from Anthrax over creative and stylistic differences.

After firing Belladonna, the remaining members of Anthrax auditioned several vocalists including Mark Osegueda of Death Angel and Spike Xavier of Mind Over Four. However, Armored Saint vocalist John Bushwas the standout favorite and had in fact been floated as a potential replacement for Belladonna a few years earlier due to questions about his reliability stemming from drug and alcohol abuse. The band left Island Records to sign with Elektra, releasing Sound of White Noise in 1993. A change from Anthrax's earlier work, with a dark sound influenced by alternative rock, Sound of White Noise received mostly-positive reviews. This album demonstrated that Anthrax had fully shed its cartoonish persona in favor of mature, thoughtful songwriting, which began with Persistence of Time. After Sound of White Noise longtime guitarist Dan Spitz left the band to become a watchmaker, leaving Anthrax a quartet for two years. In 1995 Anthrax released their seventh studio album Stomp 442, on which Charlie Benante played most of the lead-guitar parts. Benante was assisted by Paul Crook, who later became the band's touring lead guitarist for several years, and Dimebag Darrell of Pantera. Because Elektra did not promote the album it was less commercially successful than its predecessor, and Anthrax severed its ties with the label.

The band signed with independent label Ignition Records, releasing Volume 8: The Threat Is Real in 1998. As on Stomp 442, Benante performed lead guitar parts along with Crook and Darrell. The album also features Pantera vocalist Phil Anselmomaking a guest vocal appearance. After the album's release the label went bankrupt, disrupting its distribution. Anthrax then signed with Beyond Records, who released the greatest-hits album Return of the Killer A's(1999), after which Beyond went out of business as well. During this period a two-vocalist tour with Belladonna and Bush was planned, but Belladonna decided not to participate at the last minute. Despite hardships and legal entanglements over album rights, Anthrax continued. In 2001 Rob Caggiano joined the band on lead guitar. During the 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States the band changed its website, providing information about the disease after people began searching "anthrax.com" on internet search engines. Amid a potential PRnightmare, Anthrax issued a press release on October 10, 2001 joking that the band's name would be changed to "something more friendly, like 'Basket Full of Puppies'." Anthrax dispelled any name-change rumors derived from the press release at the November 2001 New York Steel 9/11 benefit concert, when they took the stage in boiler suits with a different word on each one which ultimately read "We're not changing our name". Bello has stated they did so after receiving support from members of the NYPD and NYFD, who believed that changing the name of the band would send the wrong message. In 2003, the band signed to Sanctuary Records and released their ninth studio album We've Come for You All, praised by metal journalists as a return to form.

In April 2005, Anthrax announced that the "classic" lineup of Scott Ian, Charlie Benante, Dan Spitz, Joey Belladonna and Frank Bello would reform. At some shows on the following tour, they played Among the Living in its entirety. Although the lineup was expected to record a new album after the tour, in January 2007 Ian said that Belladonna had not agreed to a reunion. After that announcement it was uncertain if John Bush would return, since Bush said he was unready to re-commit to Anthrax. In December 2007 it was announced that the band's new vocalist would be Dan Nelson, formerly of Devilsize, and Rob Caggiano would return as lead guitarist. In May 2008, Anthrax played its first show in 19 months at Double Door in Chicago. Appearing before a sold-out audience with Nelson, the band played new material which was well received (despite equipment problems). In early 2009, Anthrax began a brief tour opening for Iron Maiden in South America. In July, band manager Izvor Zivkovic confirmed the departure of Dan Nelson due to illness. Nelson denied this, saying that he was fired. All subsequent performances were canceled except the August UK Sonisphere Festival, which featured John Bush on vocals. Due to fan response after his performance, a "Bring Back Bush" campaign began and was endorsed by Ian. Joey Belladonna returned to the band in early 2010 for the Sonisphere dates as well as committing to record a new studio album with the band. In June 2010 Anthrax, Metallica, Megadeth and Slayer performed on the same bill for the first time ever at seven Sonisphere shows. In June Anthrax released the single "Fight 'Em 'Til You Can't" from the then-upcoming new album on their website as a free download to thank fans for their patience in waiting several years for new material. Worship Music was released on September 13, 2011 and debuted at #12 on the Billboard Top 200 album charts, their highest chart position since Sound of White Noise in 1993. In January 2013, Anthrax announced that lead guitarist Rob Caggiano had left the band to join Volbeat. It was announced shortly afterwards that Jonathan Donais of Shadows Fall had been hired as the band's touring lead guitarist. Donais was confirmed as an official member in August of that year. In March, Anthrax released the Anthems EP featuring cover versions of 1970s rock songs as well as two new versions of the song "Crawl" from Worship Music. The band began 2016 with a short US tour with Lamb of God and released their eleventh studio album For All Kings on February 26, 2016. The album debuted on the Billboard200 charts at number 9, surpassing the number 12 debut of Worship Music. And they're still hard at it today.

Anthrax has a very well established legacy as one of the true pioneering bands of thrash metal, often referred to among what is known as the "Big Four" of Thrash, alongside Metallica, Megadeth, and Slayer. Ironically enough, of these four, Anthrax is the only band to have been formed in the East, rather than the Bay Area. But their fans still love their iconic approach to the genre, whether it's a more serious approach, or an approach that's all in good fun. It truly is a madhouse when Anthrax takes the stage.

Let's take a trip back to August, 1990. Off the album Persistence in Time, this is "Got the Time" as originally performed by Joe Jackson, and interpreted by Anthrax. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #Anthrax #PersistenceInTime #GotTheTime #JoeJackson #Metal #ThrashMetal
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Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Happy Thursday! I finally found some time to write out more than I have lately, so let's get right into some Ozzy Osbourne.

In 1971, Benatar began to pursue a singing career after being inspired by a Liza Minnelli concert she saw in Richmond. She got a job as a singing waitress at a nightclub named The Roaring Twenties and got a gig singing in the lounge band Coxon's Army, a regular at Sam Miller's basement club. The band was the subject of a never-aired PBS special; its bassist Roger Capps was later the original bass player for the Pat Benatar Band. The period also yielded Benatar's first and only single until her eventual 1979 single (taken from the album 'In the Heat of the Night' on Chrysalis Records): "Day Gig" (1974), Trace Records, written and produced by Coxon's Army band leader Phil Coxon and locally released in Richmond. In 1975, Benatar performed at an amateur night at the comedy club Catch a Rising Starin New York. Her rendition of Judy Garland's "Rock-a-Bye Your Baby With a Dixie Melody" earned her a call back by club owner Rick Newman, who became her manager. Halloween 1977 proved a pivotal night in Benatar's early, spandexed stage persona. She entered a Halloween contest at the Cafe Figaro in Greenwich Village dressed as a character from the film Cat-Women of the Moon. Later that evening, she went onstage at Catch a Rising Star still in costume. Between appearances at Catch a Rising Star, she recorded commercial jingles for Pepsi Cola and a number of regional brands. She headlined New York City's Tramps nightclub for four days in the spring of 1978, where her performance was heard by representatives from several record companies. She was signed to Chrysalis Records by co-founder Terry Ellis the following week. Pat Benatar and Dennis Benatar divorced shortly after, but she kept his surname.

Benatar's debut album In the Heat of the Nightwas released in August 1979, and reached #12 in the US in early 1980. Mike Chapmanproduced three tracks on the album, while engineer Peter Coleman oversaw the rest. In addition, Chapman and his song-writing partner, Nicky Chinn, wrote three songs that appear on the LP, "In the Heat of the Night" and "If You Think You Know How to Love Me" which were previously recorded by Smokie, and a rearranged version of a song they wrote for Sweet, "No You Don't". The album also featured two songs written by Roger Capps and Benatar, and "I Need a Lover" written by John Mellencamp and "Don't Let It Show" written by Alan Parsons and Eric Woolfson. The album was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America in December 1980. In Canada it was certified 4× platinum where it peaked at number 3 on the RPM albums chart. In August 1980, Benatar released her LP, Crimes of Passion, featuring her signature song "Hit Me with Your Best Shot" along with the controversial song "Hell Is for Children", which was inspired by reading a series of articles in the New York Times about child abuse in America. "Hit Me With Your Best Shot" (US #9) was her first single to break the US Top 10 and sold more than a million copies in the United States. The album peaked for five consecutive weeks at #2 in the US in January 1981 and eventually sold over five million copies, and a month later, Benatar won her first Grammy Award for "Best Female Rock Vocal Performance" of 1980 for the album.

In July 1981, her third LP, Precious Time was released. A month later, the album hit #1 on the Billboard US Top 200 LP chart. It was also her first to chart in the UK, reaching #30. The album's lead single, "Fire and Ice", (co-written by band member Scott Sheets) was another big hit (US #17, AUS #30) and won Benatar her second Grammy Award, this time for "Best Female Rock Vocal Performance" of 1981 and her third consecutive RIAA certified platinum album. A hit single, "Shadows of the Night", (US #13, AUS #19) heralded a new LP, Get Nervous, released in late 1982. The album was another smash, reaching US #4, her fourth consecutive RIAA and CRIA platinum certification, and the single garnered Benatar her third Grammy, again for "Best Female Rock Vocal Performance" of 1982. The follow-up singles, "Little Too Late" and "Looking for a Stranger", were also successful, hitting US #20 and #39 respectively.

In August 1984, Benatar released her fifth studio album, Tropico (US #14, AUS #9, UK #31). The single "We Belong", released in October 1984, a month prior to the album release, became another top 10 hit in the US peaking at #5 and #7 in Australia. It was also Benatar's first ever UK top 40 hit, where it peaked at #22. A second single release, "Ooh Ooh Song", reached US #36. It is also said by Benatar and Giraldo that this album is the first where they moved away from Benatar's famed "hard rock" sound and start experimenting with new, sometimes "gentler", styles and sounds. Despite not quite making the US Top 10, it immediately earned her a sixth consecutive RIAA and CRIA platinum-certified album. In 1985, she released her sixth studio album, Seven the Hard Way. Benatar hit the US Top 10 with the Grammy nominated single "Invincible" which was written by Holly Knight (Love Is a Battlefield) and Simon Climie in 1985, three full months before the album was released. Her other Grammy nominated single, "Sex As a Weapon", climbed as high as #28 in January 1986, and "Le Bel Age" in February. The album Seven the Hard Way peaked at #26, earning an RIAA Gold certification. In July 1988, Benatar released her seventh studio album, Wide Awake in Dreamland. The album also earned an RIAA gold certification and was her eighth consecutive platinum certified album in Canada, where it peaked at 11 on the albums chart.

True Love was a jump blues record, released in late April 1991, and featured the blues band Roomful of Blues, backing up Pat Benatar, Neil Giraldo and Myron Grombacher. The album sold over 339,000 copies without significant radio airplay and limited exposure on VH-1. Gravity's Rainbow (US #85) was released in 1993 and was a return to the AOR genre. "Everybody Lay Down" was picked up by Album Rock radio and went all the way to #3. The single was never released to Top 40/Contemporary Hit Radio and a music video was never produced. "Somebody's Baby" was instead released as the single to Top 40 radio and a music video produced. In Canada the album peaked at 44 on the albums sale charts. A third track was scheduled and a video shot for "Everytime I Fall Back", but the single was never released and the music video was lost when Chrysalis was sold to EMI records. Benatar had become pregnant again and this may have had an effect on her label's support of the album. The tour for this album was only 7 dates, cut short because of the pregnancy. This was Benatar's last album recorded for Chrysalis records. With very little promotion from Chrysalis, Gravity's Rainbow failed to have the same commercial success as Benatar's previous works. Innamorata (US #171) was released in 1997 on the CMC International record label. A single video was produced for "Strawberry Wine (Life is Sweet)". According to SoundScan, the album sold close to 65,000 copies. Benatar has released only one album of new material since 1997's Innamorata, which is 2003's Go (US #187). The album included the 9/11 charity single, "Christmas in America" as a bonus track.  she continues to record off and on today.

One of the more known stars of the 1980's, Pat Benatar remains a household name in rock, and remains one of the more well known established female singers of the genre, up there with the likes of Joan Jett and Janis Joplin. Even if she's not as active, her work is impossible not to recognize, and impossible not to love at times.

Let's take a trip back to November, 1982. Off the album Get Nervous, this is "Shadows of the Night" as performed by Pat Benatar. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #PatBenatar #GetNervous #ShadowsOfTheNight #HardRock #ClassicRock #Rock

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Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Happy Thursday! I finally found some time to write out more than I have lately, so let's get right into some Pat Benatar.

In 1971, Benatar began to pursue a singing career after being inspired by a Liza Minnelli concert she saw in Richmond. She got a job as a singing waitress at a nightclub named The Roaring Twenties and got a gig singing in the lounge band Coxon's Army, a regular at Sam Miller's basement club. The band was the subject of a never-aired PBS special; its bassist Roger Capps was later the original bass player for the Pat Benatar Band. The period also yielded Benatar's first and only single until her eventual 1979 single (taken from the album 'In the Heat of the Night' on Chrysalis Records): "Day Gig" (1974), Trace Records, written and produced by Coxon's Army band leader Phil Coxon and locally released in Richmond. In 1975, Benatar performed at an amateur night at the comedy club Catch a Rising Starin New York. Her rendition of Judy Garland's "Rock-a-Bye Your Baby With a Dixie Melody" earned her a call back by club owner Rick Newman, who became her manager. Halloween 1977 proved a pivotal night in Benatar's early, spandexed stage persona. She entered a Halloween contest at the Cafe Figaro in Greenwich Village dressed as a character from the film Cat-Women of the Moon. Later that evening, she went onstage at Catch a Rising Star still in costume. Between appearances at Catch a Rising Star, she recorded commercial jingles for Pepsi Cola and a number of regional brands. She headlined New York City's Tramps nightclub for four days in the spring of 1978, where her performance was heard by representatives from several record companies. She was signed to Chrysalis Records by co-founder Terry Ellis the following week. Pat Benatar and Dennis Benatar divorced shortly after, but she kept his surname.

Benatar's debut album In the Heat of the Nightwas released in August 1979, and reached #12 in the US in early 1980. Mike Chapmanproduced three tracks on the album, while engineer Peter Coleman oversaw the rest. In addition, Chapman and his song-writing partner, Nicky Chinn, wrote three songs that appear on the LP, "In the Heat of the Night" and "If You Think You Know How to Love Me" which were previously recorded by Smokie, and a rearranged version of a song they wrote for Sweet, "No You Don't". The album also featured two songs written by Roger Capps and Benatar, and "I Need a Lover" written by John Mellencamp and "Don't Let It Show" written by Alan Parsons and Eric Woolfson. The album was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America in December 1980. In Canada it was certified 4× platinum where it peaked at number 3 on the RPM albums chart. In August 1980, Benatar released her LP, Crimes of Passion, featuring her signature song "Hit Me with Your Best Shot" along with the controversial song "Hell Is for Children", which was inspired by reading a series of articles in the New York Times about child abuse in America. "Hit Me With Your Best Shot" (US #9) was her first single to break the US Top 10 and sold more than a million copies in the United States. The album peaked for five consecutive weeks at #2 in the US in January 1981 and eventually sold over five million copies, and a month later, Benatar won her first Grammy Award for "Best Female Rock Vocal Performance" of 1980 for the album.

In July 1981, her third LP, Precious Time was released. A month later, the album hit #1 on the Billboard US Top 200 LP chart. It was also her first to chart in the UK, reaching #30. The album's lead single, "Fire and Ice", (co-written by band member Scott Sheets) was another big hit (US #17, AUS #30) and won Benatar her second Grammy Award, this time for "Best Female Rock Vocal Performance" of 1981 and her third consecutive RIAA certified platinum album. A hit single, "Shadows of the Night", (US #13, AUS #19) heralded a new LP, Get Nervous, released in late 1982. The album was another smash, reaching US #4, her fourth consecutive RIAA and CRIA platinum certification, and the single garnered Benatar her third Grammy, again for "Best Female Rock Vocal Performance" of 1982. The follow-up singles, "Little Too Late" and "Looking for a Stranger", were also successful, hitting US #20 and #39 respectively.

In August 1984, Benatar released her fifth studio album, Tropico (US #14, AUS #9, UK #31). The single "We Belong", released in October 1984, a month prior to the album release, became another top 10 hit in the US peaking at #5 and #7 in Australia. It was also Benatar's first ever UK top 40 hit, where it peaked at #22. A second single release, "Ooh Ooh Song", reached US #36. It is also said by Benatar and Giraldo that this album is the first where they moved away from Benatar's famed "hard rock" sound and start experimenting with new, sometimes "gentler", styles and sounds. Despite not quite making the US Top 10, it immediately earned her a sixth consecutive RIAA and CRIA platinum-certified album. In 1985, she released her sixth studio album, Seven the Hard Way. Benatar hit the US Top 10 with the Grammy nominated single "Invincible" which was written by Holly Knight (Love Is a Battlefield) and Simon Climie in 1985, three full months before the album was released. Her other Grammy nominated single, "Sex As a Weapon", climbed as high as #28 in January 1986, and "Le Bel Age" in February. The album Seven the Hard Way peaked at #26, earning an RIAA Gold certification. In July 1988, Benatar released her seventh studio album, Wide Awake in Dreamland. The album also earned an RIAA gold certification and was her eighth consecutive platinum certified album in Canada, where it peaked at 11 on the albums chart.

True Love was a jump blues record, released in late April 1991, and featured the blues band Roomful of Blues, backing up Pat Benatar, Neil Giraldo and Myron Grombacher. The album sold over 339,000 copies without significant radio airplay and limited exposure on VH-1. Gravity's Rainbow (US #85) was released in 1993 and was a return to the AOR genre. "Everybody Lay Down" was picked up by Album Rock radio and went all the way to #3. The single was never released to Top 40/Contemporary Hit Radio and a music video was never produced. "Somebody's Baby" was instead released as the single to Top 40 radio and a music video produced. In Canada the album peaked at 44 on the albums sale charts. A third track was scheduled and a video shot for "Everytime I Fall Back", but the single was never released and the music video was lost when Chrysalis was sold to EMI records. Benatar had become pregnant again and this may have had an effect on her label's support of the album. The tour for this album was only 7 dates, cut short because of the pregnancy. This was Benatar's last album recorded for Chrysalis records. With very little promotion from Chrysalis, Gravity's Rainbow failed to have the same commercial success as Benatar's previous works. Innamorata (US #171) was released in 1997 on the CMC International record label. A single video was produced for "Strawberry Wine (Life is Sweet)". According to SoundScan, the album sold close to 65,000 copies. Benatar has released only one album of new material since 1997's Innamorata, which is 2003's Go (US #187). The album included the 9/11 charity single, "Christmas in America" as a bonus track.  she continues to record off and on today.

One of the more known stars of the 1980's, Pat Benatar remains a household name in rock, and remains one of the more well known established female singers of the genre, up there with the likes of Joan Jett and Janis Joplin. Even if she's not as active, her work is impossible not to recognize, and impossible not to love at times.

Let's take a trip back to November, 1982. Off the album Get Nervous, this is "Shadows of the Night" as performed by Pat Benatar. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #PatBenatar #GetNervous #ShadowsOfTheNight #HardRock #ClassicRock #Rock
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Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Happy Thursday! I finally found some time to write out more than I have lately, so let's get right into some Ozzy Osbourne.

After his dismissal from Black Sabbath due to his rampant drug abuse, he was signed to Don Arden's Jet Records. In late 1979, under the management of the Ardens, Osbourne formed The Blizzard of Ozz, featuring drummer Lee Kerslake (of Uriah Heep), bassist-lyricist Bob Daisley (of Rainbow and later Uriah Heep), keyboardist Don Airey (of Rainbow, and later Deep Purple), and guitarist Randy Rhoads (of Quiet Riot). The record company would eventually title the group's debut album Blizzard of Ozz credited simply under Osbourne's name, thus commencing his solo career. Co-written with Daisley and Rhoads, the album brought Osbourne considerable success on his first solo effort. Blizzard of Ozz is one of the few albums amongst the 100 best-sellers of the 1980s to have achieved multi-platinum status without the benefit of a top-40 single. As of August 1997, it had achieved quadruple platinum status according to RIAA. Osbourne's second album, Diary of a Madman, featured more songs co-written with Lee Kerslake. Tommy Aldridge and Rudy Sarzo soon replaced Kerslake and Daisley. Aldridge had been Osbourne's original choice for drummer, but another commitment made him unavailable. Sarzo had played in Quiet Riot with Rhoads, who recommended him for the position.

On 19 March 1982, in Florida for the Diary of a Madman tour, and a week away from playing Madison Square Garden in New York City, a light aircraft piloted by Andrew Aycock (the band's tour bus driver) – carrying Rhoads and Rachel Youngblood, the band's costume and make-up designer – crashed while performing low passes over the band's tour bus. The left wing of the aircraft clipped the bus, causing the plane to graze a tree and crash into the garage of a nearby mansion, killing Rhoads, Aycock, and Youngblood. Rhoads was 25. Experiencing firsthand the horrific death of his close friend and bandmate, Osbourne fell into a deep depression. The tour was cancelled for two weeks while Osbourne, Sharon, and Aldridge returned to Los Angeles to take stock while Sarzo remained in Florida with family. With a two-week deadline to find a new guitarist and resume the tour, Robert Sarzo, brother of the band's bassist Rudy Sarzo, was chosen to replace Rhoads. However, former Gillan guitarist Bernie Tormé had flown to California from England with the promise from Jet Records that he had the job. Once Sharon realized that Jet Records had already paid Tormé an advance, he was reluctantly hired instead of Sarzo. The tour resumed on April 1, 1982, but Tormé's blues-based style was unpopular with fans. After a handful of shows he informed Sharon that he would be returning to England to continue work on a solo album he had begun before coming to America. At an audition in a hotel room, Osbourne selected Night Ranger's Brad Gillis to finish the tour.

In 1983, Jake E. Lee, formerly of Ratt and Rough Cutt, joined Osbourne to record Bark at the Moon. The album, cowritten with Daisley, featured Aldridge and former Rainbow keyboard player Don Airey. Within weeks the album became certified gold. It has sold three million copies in the US. 1986's The Ultimate Sin followed (with bassist Phil Soussan and drummer Randy Castillo), and touring behind both albums with former Uriah Heep keyboardist John Sinclair joining prior to the Ultimate Sin tour. At the time of its release, The Ultimate Sin was Osbourne's highest charting studio album. Jake E. Lee and Osbourne parted ways in 1987. Osbourne continued to struggle with chemical dependency.  In 1988, Osbourne found Zakk Wylde, who was the most enduring replacement for Rhoads to date. Together they recorded No Rest for the Wicked with Castillo on drums, Sinclair on keyboards, and Daisley co-writing lyrics and playing bass. The subsequent tour saw Osbourne reunited with erstwhile Black Sabbath bandmate Geezer Butler on bass.

Successful through the 1980s, Osbourne sustained commercial success into the 1990s, starting with 1991's No More Tears, featuring "Mama, I'm Coming Home". The album enjoyed much radio and MTV exposure. It also initiated a practice of bringing in outside composers to help pen Osbourne's solo material instead of relying on his recording ensemble. The album was mixed by veteran rock producer Michael Wagener. Osbourne was awarded a Grammy Award for the track "I Don't Want to Change the World" from Live & Loud, for Best Metal Performance of 1994. Wagener also mixed the live album Live & Loud released on 28 June 1993. Intended to be Osbourne's final album, it went platinum four times over, and ranked at number 10 on that year's Billboard rock charts. At this point Osbourne expressed his fatigue with touring, and proclaimed his "retirement tour". It was called "No More Tours". Alice in Chains' Mike Inez took over on bass and Kevin Jones played keyboards as Sinclair was touring with The Cult. In 1995 Osbourne released Ozzmosis and returned to touring, dubbing his concert performances "The Retirement Sucks Tour". The album reached number 4 on the US Billboard 200. The RIAA certified the album gold and platinum in that same year, and double platinum in April 1999. Ozzy's biggest success of the 1990's would be the founding of Ozzfest.

Down to Earth, Osbourne's first album of new studio material in six years, was released on 16 October 2001. In 2003 Osbourne recruited former Metallica bassist Jason Newsted after he left the band in 2001 (and Trujillo replaced him on Metallica's line-up). Both Newsted and Osbourne were enthusiastic about recording an album together, but this never came to fruition. He was parodied by The Wiggles in their 2003 video "Space Dancing" as Wozzy Hasbourne on a poster. In March 2006, he said that he hoped to release a new studio album soon with longtime on-off guitarist, Zakk Wylde of Black Label Society. In October 2006, it was announced that Tony Iommi, Ronnie James Dio, Vinny Appice, and Geezer Butler would be touring together again, though not as Black Sabbath, but under the moniker Heaven and Hell (the title of Dio's first Black Sabbath album). The response to the news on Osbourne's website was that Osbourne wished Tony and Ronnie well and that there is only one Sabbath. Osbourne's album, titled Black Rain, was released on 22 May 2007. Osbourne's first new studio album in almost six years, it featured a more serious tone than previous albums. In December, Osbourne announced he would be releasing a new album titled Soul Sucka with Gus G, Tommy Clufetoson drums, and Blasko on bass. Negative fan feedback was brought to Osbourne's attention regarding the album title. In respect of fan opinion, on 29 March Osbourne announced his album would be renamed Scream.

Ozzy is still at it today, despite old age and bad habits that have greatly affected his body, but even with the constant setbacks in his career, Ozzy is a staple name of metal music in more ways than one. Having the privilege to work with a guitarist who was ranked 85th in the best guitarists of all time by Rolling Stone, and penning some of the most iconic and recognizable songs in the genre, you can't deny Ozzy his credit. The man is a walking wonder.

Let's take a trip back to September, 1991. Off the album of the same name, this is "No More Tears" as performed by the one and only Ozzy Osbourne. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #OzzyOsbourne #NoMoreTears #HeavyMetal #Metal #Rock

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Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Happy Thursday! I finally found some time to write out more than I have lately, so let's get right into some Ozzy Osbourne.

After his dismissal from Black Sabbath due to his rampant drug abuse, he was signed to Don Arden's Jet Records. In late 1979, under the management of the Ardens, Osbourne formed The Blizzard of Ozz, featuring drummer Lee Kerslake (of Uriah Heep), bassist-lyricist Bob Daisley (of Rainbow and later Uriah Heep), keyboardist Don Airey (of Rainbow, and later Deep Purple), and guitarist Randy Rhoads (of Quiet Riot). The record company would eventually title the group's debut album Blizzard of Ozz credited simply under Osbourne's name, thus commencing his solo career. Co-written with Daisley and Rhoads, the album brought Osbourne considerable success on his first solo effort. Blizzard of Ozz is one of the few albums amongst the 100 best-sellers of the 1980s to have achieved multi-platinum status without the benefit of a top-40 single. As of August 1997, it had achieved quadruple platinum status according to RIAA. Osbourne's second album, Diary of a Madman, featured more songs co-written with Lee Kerslake. Tommy Aldridge and Rudy Sarzo soon replaced Kerslake and Daisley. Aldridge had been Osbourne's original choice for drummer, but another commitment made him unavailable. Sarzo had played in Quiet Riot with Rhoads, who recommended him for the position.

On 19 March 1982, in Florida for the Diary of a Madman tour, and a week away from playing Madison Square Garden in New York City, a light aircraft piloted by Andrew Aycock (the band's tour bus driver) – carrying Rhoads and Rachel Youngblood, the band's costume and make-up designer – crashed while performing low passes over the band's tour bus. The left wing of the aircraft clipped the bus, causing the plane to graze a tree and crash into the garage of a nearby mansion, killing Rhoads, Aycock, and Youngblood. Rhoads was 25. Experiencing firsthand the horrific death of his close friend and bandmate, Osbourne fell into a deep depression. The tour was cancelled for two weeks while Osbourne, Sharon, and Aldridge returned to Los Angeles to take stock while Sarzo remained in Florida with family. With a two-week deadline to find a new guitarist and resume the tour, Robert Sarzo, brother of the band's bassist Rudy Sarzo, was chosen to replace Rhoads. However, former Gillan guitarist Bernie Tormé had flown to California from England with the promise from Jet Records that he had the job. Once Sharon realized that Jet Records had already paid Tormé an advance, he was reluctantly hired instead of Sarzo. The tour resumed on April 1, 1982, but Tormé's blues-based style was unpopular with fans. After a handful of shows he informed Sharon that he would be returning to England to continue work on a solo album he had begun before coming to America. At an audition in a hotel room, Osbourne selected Night Ranger's Brad Gillis to finish the tour.

In 1983, Jake E. Lee, formerly of Ratt and Rough Cutt, joined Osbourne to record Bark at the Moon. The album, cowritten with Daisley, featured Aldridge and former Rainbow keyboard player Don Airey. Within weeks the album became certified gold. It has sold three million copies in the US. 1986's The Ultimate Sin followed (with bassist Phil Soussan and drummer Randy Castillo), and touring behind both albums with former Uriah Heep keyboardist John Sinclair joining prior to the Ultimate Sin tour. At the time of its release, The Ultimate Sin was Osbourne's highest charting studio album. Jake E. Lee and Osbourne parted ways in 1987. Osbourne continued to struggle with chemical dependency.  In 1988, Osbourne found Zakk Wylde, who was the most enduring replacement for Rhoads to date. Together they recorded No Rest for the Wicked with Castillo on drums, Sinclair on keyboards, and Daisley co-writing lyrics and playing bass. The subsequent tour saw Osbourne reunited with erstwhile Black Sabbath bandmate Geezer Butler on bass.

Successful through the 1980s, Osbourne sustained commercial success into the 1990s, starting with 1991's No More Tears, featuring "Mama, I'm Coming Home". The album enjoyed much radio and MTV exposure. It also initiated a practice of bringing in outside composers to help pen Osbourne's solo material instead of relying on his recording ensemble. The album was mixed by veteran rock producer Michael Wagener. Osbourne was awarded a Grammy Award for the track "I Don't Want to Change the World" from Live & Loud, for Best Metal Performance of 1994. Wagener also mixed the live album Live & Loud released on 28 June 1993. Intended to be Osbourne's final album, it went platinum four times over, and ranked at number 10 on that year's Billboard rock charts. At this point Osbourne expressed his fatigue with touring, and proclaimed his "retirement tour". It was called "No More Tours". Alice in Chains' Mike Inez took over on bass and Kevin Jones played keyboards as Sinclair was touring with The Cult. In 1995 Osbourne released Ozzmosis and returned to touring, dubbing his concert performances "The Retirement Sucks Tour". The album reached number 4 on the US Billboard 200. The RIAA certified the album gold and platinum in that same year, and double platinum in April 1999. Ozzy's biggest success of the 1990's would be the founding of Ozzfest.

Down to Earth, Osbourne's first album of new studio material in six years, was released on 16 October 2001. In 2003 Osbourne recruited former Metallica bassist Jason Newsted after he left the band in 2001 (and Trujillo replaced him on Metallica's line-up). Both Newsted and Osbourne were enthusiastic about recording an album together, but this never came to fruition. He was parodied by The Wiggles in their 2003 video "Space Dancing" as Wozzy Hasbourne on a poster. In March 2006, he said that he hoped to release a new studio album soon with longtime on-off guitarist, Zakk Wylde of Black Label Society. In October 2006, it was announced that Tony Iommi, Ronnie James Dio, Vinny Appice, and Geezer Butler would be touring together again, though not as Black Sabbath, but under the moniker Heaven and Hell (the title of Dio's first Black Sabbath album). The response to the news on Osbourne's website was that Osbourne wished Tony and Ronnie well and that there is only one Sabbath. Osbourne's album, titled Black Rain, was released on 22 May 2007. Osbourne's first new studio album in almost six years, it featured a more serious tone than previous albums. In December, Osbourne announced he would be releasing a new album titled Soul Sucka with Gus G, Tommy Clufetoson drums, and Blasko on bass. Negative fan feedback was brought to Osbourne's attention regarding the album title. In respect of fan opinion, on 29 March Osbourne announced his album would be renamed Scream.

Ozzy is still at it today, despite old age and bad habits that have greatly affected his body, but even with the constant setbacks in his career, Ozzy is a staple name of metal music in more ways than one. Having the privilege to work with a guitarist who was ranked 85th in the best guitarists of all time by Rolling Stone, and penning some of the most iconic and recognizable songs in the genre, you can't deny Ozzy his credit. The man is a walking wonder.

Let's take a trip back to September, 1991. Off the album of the same name, this is "No More Tears" as performed by the one and only Ozzy Osbourne. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #OzzyOsbourne #NoMoreTears #HeavyMetal #Metal #Rock
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Post has shared content
Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Hey guys, this still kinda pressed against the wall. A bit of personal stress and whatnot sp I didn't get the time to do much this week either. I know, I gotta catch up. I hope you'll hang in there as I try and figure things out. For now, here's another awesome song for your Thursday.

Let's take a trip back to November, 1985. Off the album Rock a Little, this is "I Can't Wait" as performed by Stevie Nicks. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #StevieNicks #RockALittle #ICantWait #PopRock #ClassicRock #Rock

Post has attachment
Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Hey guys, this still kinda pressed against the wall. A bit of personal stress and whatnot sp I didn't get the time to do much this week either. I know, I gotta catch up. I hope you'll hang in there as I try and figure things out. For now, here's another awesome song for your Thursday.

Let's take a trip back to November, 1985. Off the album Rock a Little, this is "I Can't Wait" as performed by Stevie Nicks. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #StevieNicks #RockALittle #ICantWait #PopRock #ClassicRock #Rock
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Happy Thursday guys. I'm sorry to say that I'm very pressed for time today, so instead of my usual description, you're just getting a song today. But I'll be back with the usual stuff hopefully next week. Until then...

Let's take a trip back to October, 1984. Off the album Volatte, this is "Too Late for Goodbyes" as performed by Julian Lennon. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #JulianLennon #Volatte #TooLateForGoodbyes #PopRock #ClassicRock #Rock

Post has attachment
Throwback Thursday's Resurrection Jukebox

Happy Thursday guys. I'm sorry to say that I'm very pressed for time today, so instead of my usual description, you're just getting a song today. But I'll be back with the usual stuff hopefully next week. Until then...

Let's take a trip back to October, 1984. Off the album Volatte, this is "Too Late for Goodbyes" as performed by Julian Lennon. Please feel free to voice your thoughts and opinions on the artist and song down below, or leave a requesting an artist or song you'd like to see featured. All comments, ratings, and shares are very much appreciated, and as always, enjoy the listen.

#ThrowbackThursday #tbt #JulianLennon #Volatte #TooLateForGoodbyes #PopRock #ClassicRock #Rock
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