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Lee Sibbald
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We recently interviewed Steve Diamond who offered some great recommendations.
We interview Steve Diamond, author of Residue and founder of Elitist Book Reviews, and ask him to tell us about the books that he loves. Includes lots of great recommendations.

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A new review from our steampunk specialist, Daniel Cann.
New #steampunk #review - Ghosts of War by George Mann

It is 1927, and New York City is under attack. Flying among the airships, strange winged creatures swoop from the sky and carry away its citizens, and only the Ghost can protect them. He is close to finding their origin: a deranged military scientist who is slowly rebuilding himself as a machine... The Cold War with the British Empire threatens to escalate into bloodshed, and there are murmurs of a terrible weapon that could fracture space itself. Only by making an uneasy alliance with a British spy will the hero, haunted by memories of his own war, stand a chance of preventing another...

"The story is familiar but it is the backdrop and setting that makes this worth a read. It can get macabre and gruesome at times, but for the most part this is an enjoyable romp over the rooftops of NYC with plenty of aerial battles and gadgets thrown in."

Read the full review on Fantasy Book Review.

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I review an anthology of post-apocalyptic short stories. Wastelands 2 is the sequel to the excellent Wastelands: More Stories of the Apocalypse. Highly recommended.
New anthology #bookreview  - Wastelands 2: More Stories of the Apocalypse edited by John Joseph Adams

For decades, the apocalypse and its aftermath have yielded some of the most exciting short stories of all time. From David Brin's seminal The Postman to Hugh Howey's Deep Blood Kettle and Tananarive Due's prescient Patient Zero, the end of the world continues to thrill.

"As with all of John Joseph Adams’ work I highly recommended it. The wonderful thing about humans, and more specifically readers, is that we all like different things. The stories I loved may not be the highlights for others and vice versa. 30 well written stories available - at time of the review’s publication - at just £3.83 on the Kindle makes it extremely good value for money –there is a lot of reading in there."

Read the full review on Fantasy Book Review.

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A new review by Sandra Scholes on Fantasy Book Review.
New #graphicnovel #review - The Phone Goes Dead by Anthony Horowitz and Dan Boultwood

In Hyde Park, Linda James makes a phone call that will change her life forever. She’s in a lightning storm and under a tree as she has forgot to bring her umbrella. As we all know the two things she has done are pretty bad and as a result, she gets a lightning bolt through her that kills her and also affects the mobile phone she is holding. While the local police investigate Linda's dead body, a kid rides onto the crime scene and steals the phone, taking it to a pawn brokers. This is where the fun starts as a doting father buys the phone for his son so he can keep in touch with him. It only needs a new sim card and it is ready to be used. What sounds like a good idea becomes a bad one once David starts using it. Other than the kids at school teasing him when his mum phones, he gets anonymous calls from people he doesn't even know - people who are dead! Yes, he gets folk from beyond the grave contacting him asking him to pass messages onto their nearest and dearest.

"The Phone Goes Dead is part of the Anthony Horowitz graphic horror series illustrated by Dan Boultwood with his own unique style and action-packed sequences and shocking scenes. It is a creepy short story that is typical of Horowitz."

Read the full review on Fantasy Book Review.

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A fantastic new writing competition has been launched today, in honour of Sir Terry Pratchett.
Starting today is the free "Echo of Another World" writing competition in honor of Terry Pratchett and his classic Discworld novels. Fiction in the sci-fi/fantasy genre, up to 15,000 words. Novel excerpts are encouraged; fanfiction is not eligible to win. Entry is free! Authors will collect community votes, and the first, second, and third winners will be chosen by the Inkitt staff from the top 10% of entries. Deadline: 11:59pm PST on May 5th.

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Fergus loves the Rivers of London series but was less than impressed with this, the fifth instalment.
New review - Foxglove Summer by Ben Aaronovitch

Peter Grant travels out of London - to a small village in Herefordshire where the local police are reluctant to admit that there might be a supernatural element to the disappearance of some local children. But while you can take the London copper out of London you can't take the London out of the copper. Travelling west with Beverley Brook, Peter soon finds himself caught up in a deep mystery and having to tackle local cops and local gods. And what's more all the shops are closed by 4pm...

"Peter Grant is still as enjoyable and relatable a character to read as ever.  The world he inhabits will still draw me back again but Foxglove Summer… I will put this down as a disenfranchised story, which thankfully doesn’t detract from the main plot. Roll on Hanging Tree, redemption awaits…"

Read the full review on Fantasy Book Review.

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This anthology sounds like just my cup of tea.
This fascinating anthology has just landed - After the Fall, a collection of 20 stories exploring what would happen if technology were to crumble around us.

Review to follow soon...

Technology has changed the world around us over the last century, and promises even more great things for the future. But what does that future look like without the marvels of the machine age? After the fall of technology, what lies ahead for humanity?

http://www.fantasybookreview.co.uk/blog/2015/04/05/spotlight-after-the-fall-an-anthology/

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Another Mark Chadbourn review, this time for The Devil in Green, by travelswithadiplomat.
New review - The Devil in Green by Mark Chadbourn

Humanity has emerged, blinking, from the Age of Misrule into a world substantially changed: cities lie devasted, communications are limited, anarchy rages across the land. Society has been thrown into a new Dark Age where superstition holds sway. The Tuatha De Danaan roam the land once more, their terrible powers dwarfing anything mortals have to offer. And in their wake come all the creatures of myth and legend, no longer confined to the shadows. Fighting to find their place in this new world, the last remnants of the Christian Church call for a group of heroes: a new Knights Templar to guard the priesthood as they set out on their quest for souls. But as everything begin to fall apart, the Knights begin to realise their only hope is to call on the pagan gods of Celtic myth for help.

Read the full review on Fantasy Book Review.

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3 excellent new review on the Age of Misrule trilogy.
We have 3 brand new reviews on the site covering Mark Chadbourn's wonderful Age of Misrule trilogy. It's the second set of reviews and both reviewers are in agreement - if your thing is Celtic mythology and fantasy then this is a must-read, one of the finest in the sub-genre.

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Chapter 4 of Frank P Ryan's The Return of the Arinn (Book #4 of the Three Powers Quartet) is now available to download (along with the first 3 chapters) for free on Fantasy Book Review.
Later the year Frank P Ryan will be releasing the fourth and final book in his best-selling Three Powers Series. Frank - and his publisher Jo Fletcher Books - have very kindly allowed us to make the first four chapters of The Return of the Arinn available for free download. Check out the series here:
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