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David Devine
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David Devine

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At around 8:00 Karima Bennoune says "that something about Islam is inherently fundamentalist.  And this is just offensive and just wrong."  For the sake of information, what is wrong about this statement at this particular time in history?  Why are groups undergoing similar levels of repression, social isolation, or abuse not reacting in the same way as those who follow Islam?  Let me continue by recognizing and accepting that the move towards fundamentalism is in the minority for Muslims, that most do not respond to these pressures by becoming fundamentalist in nature.

Further, just for clarity, no one has a right not to be offended.  If I draw a cartoon and you find it offensive, I still have the right to draw that cartoon without fear of retribution.
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David Devine

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I remember a study done a few years back in which they found that patients that were given a video of the procedure as it was happening, so they could see what was happening, didn't require as much pain medication.

On another note ... is it the immersion element or is it the interactive element that causes the reduction in stress / pain?  I would argue that it is the latter ... let the person play a game and see what differences there are.
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In regards to your second point, I think it might have more to do with letting out bad behaviour, rather than feeling guilty.  That is to say, people who want to be bad have a realm in which they can do so safely, and so don't do it in real life.
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David Devine

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I had a long discussion with my brother about this a few months ago.  His argument was that so long as we manufacture robots, and know that they have some basis in programming that we have a hand in, that he could never come to believe that they are alive like we are.  The fundamental argument I believe he was going for was that the randomness of our genes and situation of birth and upbringing, would fundamentally differentiate us from something that we build.

Try to imagine how a company would be able to sell a product where it didn't know what the product would be like at the end of the manufacturing process; a dishwasher that only liked running at 2 in the afternoon or a vacuum that was afraid of floor vents.  I've seen dogs that are afraid of floor vents, but would we want something that we see as a tool to have those kinds of quirks?

Even if we were to build a companion robot, whose characteristics could be significantly random, the client would likely want to stipulate what those characteristics would be, and the robot would have to have some kind of slave mentality, lest the client complain to the company that their partner walked out on them and the company was to blame.  It's not like they would be pets, where the pound have no control over the characteristics of any particular animal, and so if the pet runs away, the pound can't be held to blame; they had no hand in or control over the pets' characteristics.

In that regard, the future of human engineering is worrisome.  If we could pick out traits, not just avoid debilitating disease or sex select, and be able to make someone come out exactly as we want them to be, would that make us any different from a robot?  Or would we be 'grandfathered' in as alive?

An idea that has been presented in other fictional media before is the systematic replacement of your brain with synthetic materials that would perform the same function, and make the same connections.  Eventually that could be either extracted and put into a brain dead body and rebooted as 'you' or shut down the biological part of your brain and run completely on the synthetic.  What if it were done in reverse, so that a synthetic brain were replaced by biological components?  Which of these would be alive?
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David Devine

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It is a poor planning department that doesn't know where there are lines on a map ... cartographers would be ashamed.
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So long as a product is less harmful and less addictive than either nicotine or alcohol, it should be legal.  Studies can determine the impact of different ways of taking the substance, and if it is determined that one method of taking the substance is more addictive or more harmful than either nicotine or alcohol, than it should be illegal.

That is, of course, so long as we want to have drugs that are legal and illegal to take, instead of having some kind of regulated free for all.  Since the latter is less likely to happen in most countries, at least in the short term, the former is a good standard.
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David Devine

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David Devine

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I find it strange that competitions would allow for players to swear at one another.  The idea presented in the basketball clip of a technical foul seems to be an appropriate response at that level of public play.
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David Devine

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Instead of using the phrase "animal ancestors" which, while correct, might be taken as 'we had animals as ancestors but we are no longer animals ourselves', perhaps consider using "evolutionary ancestors".
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David Devine

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Laci, your comment at 1:21 about bleeding and chaffing was both another thing to add to the list of what women go through and cringeworthy for me ... so ... yay?
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David Devine

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Sorry to correct, but we just call it York University.  That's not to say we don't use 'of', because we have the University of Toronto and the University of Waterloo.
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David Devine

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For me, it's not having to see ads that's the problem, it's that most ads on the internet are horribly repetitive.  Consider The Comedy Network ... with shows like The Daily Show and The Colbert Report ... they don't have different ads between each section ... they use exactly the same ads ... it becomes painful to the point that I hate the products that they're advertising for.  Then there are the long ads for short videos ... I mean if a video is a couple of minutes long, the ad before it shouldn't be the same length.  In some cases, yes, you can bypass that ... but if you're not waiting to click through the ad, then you have to live through a 1:1 signal to noise ratio.

I turn off AdBlock on some sites, because the ads are unobtrusive ... but most big sites, like YouTube, you can't be selective about it; on for the content you don't care for and off for the content you do.
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Have him in circles
14 people
David Devine's profile photo
Laci Green's profile photo
Rick Meyers's profile photo
Aaron O'Reilly's profile photo
Brent Weaver's profile photo
Alex Duval's profile photo
Jessica Huntley's profile photo
Justin Hagar's profile photo
David K's profile photo
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