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MaryAnn McCarra-Fitzpatrick
Worked at Onpoint Advocacy, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, Churchill Livingstone Publishers, Alan R. Liss, Publishers, Garland Publishing, Gannett Newspapers.
Attended CUNY Graduate Center (NYC), Manhattan College (Riverdale, NY), Lincoln High School (Yonkers, NY)
Lives in Peekskill, NY
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Poet, Writer, Mother, Wife
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  • Onpoint Advocacy, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, Churchill Livingstone Publishers, Alan R. Liss, Publishers, Garland Publishing, Gannett Newspapers.
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
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Peekskill, NY
Previously
Mount Vernon, NY - Yonkers, NY - New York, NY - Bronx, NY
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Editor, writer, poet, wife, mother........
Introduction

MaryAnn McCarra-Fitzpatrick blogs poetry at http://mccarra--poetry.blogspot.com/ 

Her work has appeared in MoonLit, The Westchester Times Tribune, Make Room for Dada, Mount Vernon Today, OBSOLETE Magazine, The Mount Vernon Inquirer, Thick With Conviction, Cavalier Literary Couture, the "Vox Mom" online feature of The Mom Egg and the Mount Vernon Independent.  Publication forthcoming in Torrid Literature and Clapboard House. Her work has been anthologized in the volume "Blood Beats in Four Square Miles" edited by james "jAFa" Fair, the first volume to gather together the work of poets living and working in Mount Vernon, New York.

A reader at such venues as The Back Fence,  Manhattan College, Blue Door Gallery, AC-BAW Arts Center, Lola's Tea House, Mount Vernon Public Library, ABC No Rio, and Centerfold Coffeehouse.
 
Poetry readings available on YouTube.
 
Poetry podcast available on Podbean and on Podsnack.
 
Audio and video samplings of her poetry are available on her blog, McCarra/Poetry.
 
In addition to the above, MaryAnn also creates collages from mixed media and found materials.  A sampling of these may be seen on Google+ and on the website "Uncooked Culture."

MaryAnn is a recent transplant to the banks of the Hudson, in Peekskill, New York--formerly having lived in the Fleetwood neighborhood of Mount Vernon, New York.  Her husband is Mark Fitzpatrick and their three sons are Aidan Michael, Conor Brian, and Brendan Walsh Fitzpatrick.

At present she is at work preparing a volume of poetry for publication.

Education
  • CUNY Graduate Center (NYC), Manhattan College (Riverdale, NY), Lincoln High School (Yonkers, NY)
    Ph.D. Program in English, 1989 - 1990
  • Manhattan College
    English and World Literature, 1985 - 1989
  • Lincoln High School
    1981 - 1985
  • Mark Twain Middle School
  • Public School No. 30
  • St. Simon Stock
  • Public School No. 33
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Female
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McCarra

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To highlight Tishman Environment and Design Center (TEDC)’s bold integration of design, policy, and social justice approaches to environmental issues, this special evening event will feature a keynote presentation by Rhea Suh, President of the Natural Resource Defense Council and a creative presentation and performance by DJ Spooky, 2014 National Geographic Emerging Explorer. Additional presenters include: David Van Zandt, President of The New School; Michelle DePass, TEDC Director and Dean of Milano School of International Affairs, Urban Policy and Management; Joel Towers, Executive Dean of Parsons School of Design; Colleen Macklin, Associate Professor at Parsons School of Design; Tanya Kalmanovitch, Faculty and Coordinator of Entrepreneurship, Mannes School of Music; Amos Lee, violinist and Christine Chen, cellist from Mannes School of Music.
Links
Tishman Environment and Design Center (TEDC) http://www.newschool.edu/tedc
THE NEW SCHOOL http://www.newschool.edu
RSVP https://www.eventbrite.com/e/earth-matters-designing-our-future-tickets-15606462349
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The city in northwest Westchester County is being discovered by those looking for housing bargains and a reasonable commute.
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#Shanley   #JohnPatrickShanley     #johnpatrickshanley     #OutsideMullingar   #outsidemullingar     #Mullingar     #mullingar     #HudsonStage     #HudsonStageCompany     #HudsonStageCo     #NorthCastleLibrary     #KentPlace   #Armonk     #ArmonkNY    #ArmonkN.Y.     #Whippoorwill     #WhippoorwillHall     #WhippoorwillHallTheatre    

17th April - 2nd May 2015
Whippoorwill Hall Theatre
North Castle Library
Kent Place
Armonk, NY 
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#Peekskill     #PeekskillNY     #PeekskillNewYork     #CityOfPeekskill   #CityofPeekskill   #HudsonRiver    #Hudson #HudsonValley   #RiverTown     #RiverTowns   #RealEstate #WestchesterRealEstate   #PeekskillRealEstate     #HudsonValleyRealEstate   

Peekskill, N.Y., a Little Country, a Little Urban

On a recent Friday evening, Dr. Chelsea Hollander and her husband, Lorenzo Dominguez, welcomed about two dozen friends for a “House of Cards” viewing party in their 1887 Victorian on Smith Street. Many were neighbors who, like their hosts, had moved there in recent years from New York City.

Dr. Hollander, an internist in Mount Kisco, N.Y., and Mr. Dominguez, a corporate writer, were longtime Manhattanites. “We had strong reservations about leaving the city,” she said.

But as the couple’s blended family grew — they now have five children — and they became frustrated by Manhattan prices, they decided to scout along the Hudson Line of the Metro-North Railroad for more space. They bought their 3,800-square-foot, eight-bedroom house two years ago for $395,000, a price that allowed them to do updating, including work on the two full and two half-baths.

The house is a short walk from the train station, giving Mr. Dominguez roughly an hour’s commute to Grand Central Terminal. “Our house is very special,” Dr. Hollander said. “We haven’t missed the city that much, and we are very social.”

Peekskill, an urban enclave of about 24,000 in suburban northwest Westchester County, is being discovered by young professional couples and families from New York City and lower Westchester. Drawn by relative housing bargains, a reasonable commute and a mix of city and country living, they are adding to the diversity of this largely blue-collar city, where the population is 37 percent Hispanic.

Clay Keene and his husband, Currier Todd, longtime Chelsea residents, “wanted a house and more space, but kind of got priced out” of Manhattan, said Mr. Keene, who works in health care. So they sought a place “near water and public transportation and within an hour of the city.”

An acquaintance told them there was an artists’ community in Peekskill. When they visited, Mr. Todd, a teacher, said, they found “a really cute downtown and lots of good restaurants.”

They paid $215,000 in December 2012 for a 2,600-square-foot Craftsman-style house that needed work. They gutted it and ended up with three bedrooms, two and a half baths, a finished basement and a patio. The redo basically doubled the cost.

The city made zoning changes to create an artists’ district downtown in the 1990s, and nearly 200 artists live and work there now, according to Maureen Winzig, a painter who is the president of the Peekskill Arts Alliance.

The art scene was a draw for Robin Kline. She and her husband, Rick, planning for retirement, have just moved from Riverdale, the Bronx, into a condominium in the Chapel Hill development, where prices can reach $500,000. Ms. Kline works part time in Manhattan, but she is also a potter, and her three-bedroom townhouse includes a basement where she plans to work on her craft.

On the grounds of a former boarding school and convent, Chapel Hill offers vistas of the Hudson Hills, an outdoor pool and a community center in a former church with a large gym. Yet Peekskill “is not a tony Westchester town,” Ms. Kline said. “It’s diverse. And the taxes are on the low side, which is great for retirees.”

What You’ll Find

Peekskill covers 4.37 square miles in a roughsemicircle, ringed by the town of Cortlandt, which it separated from in 1940. Its steep hills create an amphitheater for views of the Hudson and the surrounding green hills.

Most houses are older — sprawling Victorians, bulky multifamilies, small ranches — on cozy urban lots. The downtown historic district features late-19th- and early 20th-century brick commercial buildings. Many blocks have an empty storefront or two, but public art adds color and whimsy both downtown and along the Riverfront Green Park.

Large former homes of captains of industry dot Fort Hill, north of downtown (where there is another historic district), and Mortgage Hill, to the southeast. Chapel Hill, on the southeast border, and Riverbend, on the Hudson, are modern condominiums.

“If you are looking for acres of rolling hills,” the city “is not for you,” said Cynthia Weil, an agent with Better Homes and Gardens Rand Realty who has lived in Peekskill for more than 30 years. On the other hand, “if you like a diverse community, a nearby night life, entertainment and restaurants, really this is it in northern Westchester.”

What You’ll Pay

As of March 23, there were 48 single-family homes listed for sale in Peekskill, according to multiple listing service figures provided by Angela Lanni of the Houlihan Lawrence agency. All but five were priced below $400,000. Seven homes had sold since Jan. 1, at a median price of $284,000.

There were 27 condos for sale on March 23, all but one listed below $500,000. Since Jan. 1, eight condos had sold, with a median price of $300,000.

Prices have not yet rebounded to prerecession levels, but have slowly climbed from the lows of 2011 and 2012. For single-family homes, last year’s median sales price of $255,250 was 11 percent above the median of $230,500 in 2013. Condo prices rose 17 percent in 2014 to a median of $248,000.

Rentals are generally plentiful, either in apartment buildings or in multifamily houses, Ms. Weil said. One-bedrooms units run from $950 to $1,550, two-bedrooms $1,500 to $2,000.

What to Do

“Peekskill has very quickly become the foodie center of this part of Westchester County,” said Deborah L. Milone, executive director of the Hudson Valley Gateway Chamber of Commerce, which covers Peekskill and several neighboring communities. There are more than a dozen restaurants, pubs and coffeehouses within a few blocks of one another downtown, many having opened in the past few years. The farmers’ market on Bank Street hopes to open its outdoor season in May instead of June this year; a winter version is at the Field Library.

Ron Egatz, a poet and musician who is president of the Peekskill Arts Lofts co-op, counted “seven options for live music within a block and a half” of his apartment. Those include the 1,089-seat Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, a 1930 movie palace that offers indie and classic films, as well as concerts by the likes of America (April 26) and Judy Collins (June 12). Annual events include a riverfront concert series and a downtown music festival, in July.

The Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, just east of downtown, has exhibitions like the current show “Love: The First of the 7 Virtues,” featuring a Robert Indiana “Love” sculpture.

Two private marinas and a public launch get boaters out on the Hudson; hikers and bikers can head to Depew and Fort Hill Parks and the county’sBlue Mountain Reservation, or across the river to Bear Mountain State Park.

The Schools

The Peekskill district serves about 3,300 pupils in its six schools, the interim superintendent, Lorenzo Licopoli, said. The Uriah Hill School houses a prekindergarten program, along with the Summit Academy alternative education program for 70 students in Grades 9 to 12. Woodside Elementary School has the full-day kindergarten and first grade; Oakside Elementary, Grades 2 and 3; Hillcrest Elementary, Grades 3 and 4; and the Peekskill Middle School, Grades 6 to 8. Peekskill High School has about 800 students.

For 2013-14, the average SAT scores for the high school were 432 for reading, 434 for math and 423 for writing, compared with the state averages of 488, 502 and 478.

The Commute

Metro-North express trains take about an hour to and from Grand Central Terminal. Monthly tickets are $356; a round-trip is $32.50 at peak times, $24.50 off peak.

The History

Peekskill is named for Jan Peeck, the first European known to have set foot at the spot, around 1650. George Washington had headquarters here during the Revolutionary War. In the 19th century, the town became a stop on the Underground Railroad and a center of cast-iron stove manufacturing.

For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on Twitter:@nytrealestate.
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#Peekskill     #CityofPeekskill     #PeekskillNewYork     #PeekskillNY     #PeekskillHistory   #LocalHistory   #PeekskillMuseum   #ThePeekskill   #ThePeekskillMuseum     #cityofpeekskill     #peekskillny   #peekskillnewyork   


Story of Streets in Peekskill
Topic of Talk on Saturday, April 11, 2015 
at Peekskill Museum

The historical backgrounds to Peekskill street names is the topic of a program to be presented on Saturday, April 11 at 2 p.m. at Peekskill Museum, 124 Union Avenue in Peekskill. 

Co-authors John J. Curran and John J. Morabito will be on hand to offer their insights from their new book THE HISTORY OF PEEKSKILL, N.Y. STREET NAMES. This program is free to museum members, and by donation to the public.

“Everyone lives on a street that has a name, and every name has a meaning” states Mr. Curran. The 110-page book features more than 200 separate street listings, with more than 100 graphics. 
The published results of their year-long research and formatting is available for purchase and signing at the event. A portion of the sales will benefit the Peekskill Museum.

What is Peekskill’s oldest street? How many city streets are named after Revolutionary War Individuals and U.S. presidents? How many women have inspired Peekskill street names?

For more information, call the Peekskill Museum at (914) 736-0473. 
---------
Curran is a longtime Peekskill Museum member as past President and current Trustee. He was the Peekskill City Historian for nearly 20 years, and author of several local history books. A graduate of Peekskill High School, Curran earned a B.A. Degree in history from Allegheny College. He taught English in Japan for three years. Back in the Peekskill area, he worked as a reporter and editor of the Community Current newspaper and a columnist/writer with the former The Peekskill Herald weekly paper.

Co-author John Morabito grew up in Peekskill, and served in the Army during the Vietnam War. He later studied literature and writing at City College of San Francisco. The western United States
serve as settings for two of his early novels: The Lower Farm and The Upper Lake. Morabito returned to New York, married, raised three children and worked for a public utility for 29 years. He resumed his writing career after retirement in 2007. His Dogtown Days novel is a colorful rendition of one of Peekskill’s older neighborhoods.
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#Westchester #WestchesterCounty     #MountVernon     #MountVernonNY     #MountVernonNewYork    #MountVernonN.Y.   #NationalPoetryMonth #National  #Poetry #Month   #MVPL     #MountVernonPublic     #MountVernonPublicLibrary     #WestchesterLibrary     #Westchester     #WestchesterLibrarySystem   #WLS     #MelindaDavidHodge     #MelindaHodge     #MelindaDavid     #GraceGreeneBaker   #GraceGreeneBakerCommunityRoom   #GraceGreeneBakerCommunity     #SouthFirstAvenueMountVernonNY     #WestchesterCountyNY     #WestchesterCountyNewYork    

NATIONAL POETRY MONTH EVENT!!!!   MOUNT VERNON, NY!!!!!

23rd April 2015
Grace Greene Baker Community Room
Mount Vernon Public Library
28 First South Avenue
Mount Vernon, New York
914-668-1840

For any questions please contact Nishan Stepak, Collection Development Librarian:  nstepak@wlsmail.org
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#Peekskill   #CityofPeekskill     #PeekskillNewYork   #PeekskillNY     #PeekskillHistory     #PeekskillN .Y.     #Local   #History     #LocalHistory     #Streets #StreetNames     #ThePeekskillMuseum     #PeekskillMuseum    

The historical backgrounds to Peekskill street names is the topic of a program to be presented on Saturday, April 11 at 2 p.m. at Peekskill Museum, 124 Union Avenue in Peekskill.

Co-authors John J. Curran and John J. Morabito will be on hand to offer
their insights from their new book THE HISTORY OF PEEKSKILL, N.Y. STREET NAMES. This program is free to museum members, and by donation to the public.

“Everyone lives on a street that has a name, and every name has a meaning” states Mr. Curran. The 110-page book features more than 200 separate street listings, with more than 100 graphics. The published results of their year-long research and formatting is available for purchase and signing at the event. A portion of the sales will benefit the Peekskill Museum.

What is Peekskill’s oldest street? How many city streets are named after Revolutionary War Individuals and U.S. presidents? How many women have inspired Peekskill street names?

For more information, call the Peekskill Museum at (914) 736-0473.  -----------
Curran is a longtime Peekskill Museum member as past President and current Trustee. He was the Peekskill City Historian for nearly 20 years, and author of several local history books. A graduate of Peekskill High School, Curran earned a B.A. Degree in history from Allegheny College. He taught English in Japan for three years. Back in the Peekskill area, he worked as a reporter and editor of the Community Current newspaper and a columnist/writer with the former The Peekskill Herald weekly paper.

Co-author John Morabito grew up in Peekskill, and served in the Army during the Vietnam War. He later studied literature and writing at City College of San Francisco. The western United States serve as settings for two of his early novels: The Lower Farm and The Upper Lake. Morabito returned to New York, married, raised three children and worked for a public utility for 29 years. He resumed his writing career after retirement in 2007. His Dogtown Days novel is a colorful rendition of one of Peekskill’s older neighborhoods.
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Celebrate Earth Day on April 22, 2015 at Peekskill Field Library. Open to all ages. Plant seeds in a pot, and take it home to start your garden. Supplies are included.
PEEKSKILL, N.Y. -- The Field Library will be having a celebration ;in honor of Earth Day ;April 22. The celebration will take place from ...
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#Peekskill    #PeekskillNY    #PeekskillNewYork    #HudsonValleyNewYork    #HudsonValley #HudsonValleyNY    #LFrankBaum    #WizardOfOz #YellowBrickRoad    #PeekskillHistory    #HistoryPeekskill    #StreetNames   #HistoryOfStreetNames   #Pataki    #GeorgePataki   #JohnCurran    #JohnMorabito  


http://www.theexaminernews.com/historian-discusses-origins-of-street-names-in-peekskill/


By Michael Giuliano
Peekskill native and historian John Curran spoke on Saturday to promote his newest book: “The History of Peekskill, New York Street Names.” Co-authored with fellow Peekskill author John Morabito, the book describes the origins behind the names of all the roads in Peekskill, from “Academy Street” to “Woods Brooke Drive.”
During the monthly meeting of the Van Cortlandville Historical Society, Curran gave a talk titled “On the Street Where You Live” (named after the song from “My Fair Lady”). Curran, who is the curator of the Peekskill Museum, discussed the merits of writing a reference book, emphasizing the historical significance it represents not only for Peekskill, but for communities everywhere.
“The names [of streets] have interesting secondary meanings and connotations that most people don’t even know [about],” Curran said. “It’s an event, it’s a person, and it’s something important.”
The book took a year to write, with nine months of that focused solely on research, and even then Curran said that some information regarding street names could not be completely verified.
“In most cases there’s no documentation at all,” Curran admitted. “It’s mostly secondary information.”
One particular instance is Pemart Avenue, which branches from the Bear Mountain extension to Division Street. The street is named after Captain Francis Pemart, who alternatively fought for both the British and the Americans during the Revolutionary War. Considering that the American government eventually had Pemart tried for treason, forcing him to flee to Nova Scotia, it’s interesting to find a street named after him in this day and age.
Curran revealed that, for the most part, streets get their names from the original landowners where the streets are located, and that very few roads received names from political designations. One specific street he pointed out was Lockwood Drive, the entry road into the Highland Park residential area, which was named after Edwin Lockwood. Lockwood was the original designer for the Highland Park development during the 1940’s and 50’s.
Another notable example is Pataki Farm Drive, in the northern section of Peekskill. The road is named after the farm once owned by the family of former New York Governor George E. Pataki. Pataki’s father, Louis Pataki Sr., has a street named after him as well: Louis Court, located off of Frost Lane.
Towards the end of the meeting Bob Foley, the program chairman of the historical society, opened the floor for questions, and brought up a topic that Curran was quite enthusiastic about: the “Yellow Brick Road” of Peekskill.
Curran is an avid supporter of the notion that the iconic Yellow Brick Road from “The Wizard of Oz” is based on the once-abundant Dutch bricks that lined the streets of Peekskill. During the 1860’s, L. Frank Baum was a teenager attending the Peekskill Military Academy, and Curran maintains that the yellow-colored bricks that lined the streets could have served as inspiration for the road used in the book. Still, there are many detractors to the theory, saying that there is no solid evidence to prove Curran’s theory.
“People say, ‘There’s no written record of it.’ The point is: it’s a story,” Curran said. “It’s a story that’s a part of a story.”
If nothing else, Curran maintains that preserving and highlighting what’s left of the old yellow brick road would be a boost for the Peekskill economy, by encouraging more tourism.
“This was really the only formal schooling that [Baum] had in his entire life,” Curran said. “He was home-schooled for the rest of his life. That should be enough.”
While most of the original yellow brick pavement is gone in Peekskill, a small stretch can still be found on South Water Street, leading up to the railroad tracks behind the Standard House on Hudson Avenue.
The Van Cortlandtville Historical Society is located in the Little Red Schoolhouse, at 297 Locust Avenue in Cortlandt. Meetings are held on the third Saturday of every month, and new members and visitors are always encouraged. More information can be found on their website, www.vancort.net.
 
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