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BBC WHYS
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As top Bollywood star Salman Khan is jailed for five years, why are so many fans defending him? World Have Your Say is talking about #WeLoveYouSalmanKhan and #SalmanKhanVerdict .

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"I wish the BBC would stop calling it Islamic State because it’s not an Islamic state” - British Prime Minister.

How should media refer to the group?
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Is the majority of the future cancer "tidal wave" down to us? The World Health Organisation says the number of cancer cases will reach 24 million a year by 2035, but half could be prevented - and there is a "real need" to focus on cancer prevention by tackling smoking, obesity and drinking. Human behaviour such as sunbathing, inactivity and delaying parenthood are also linked. So how much is it down to us to take responsibility if we get cancer?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-26014693

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Should medically assisted suicide be extended to children? That's the question for discussion in Belgium, one of the few countries in Europe where doctors are able to help the terminally ill to end their lives. Supporters believe this should be extended to children, but opponents say it is "insanity." 

What are your thoughts? Tell us here and listen at 1800 GMT

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Why do we make heroes out of criminals? 

British criminal Ronnie Biggs, who took part in the 1963 Great Train Robbery, has died aged 84, his spokeswoman has confirmed.

Biggs was part of the gang which escaped with £2.6m from the Glasgow to London mail train on 8 August 1963.

Biggs divided opinion - with some people saying he was constructed a loveable rogue, while others described him as a violent criminal.

Why do we sometimes admire criminals?

Post your comments below and don't forget to tell us where in the world you are. 

caspar.leighton@bbc.co.uk

david.whitty@bbc.co.uk

At 17 GMT, WHYS will be LIVE in Vancouver discussing whether public service broadcasters are needed in a digital age.
What purpose does the BBC serve where you are?
Also, do we still need a state-funded media in an increasingly competitive digital age?
Post you comments below and don't forget to tell us where you are.

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Coming up at 1030GMT we will hear from two protest camps in Cairo, where an operation is expected to begin to try and clear the thousands of pro-Morsi demonstrators that have been positioned there for over a month.
An interior ministry source said plans to break up the protest camps would begin around dawn, but there is as yet no sign of any police activity outside the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in eastern Cairo and at Nahda Square, to the west.
The Egyptian foreign minister, Nabil Fahmy, has told the BBC the demonstrations will have to end very soon because of the disruption they are causing. Mr Fahmy said the government was still hoping to resolve the situation through dialogue but if the police had to take action to clear the sit-ins, they would do so within the law.
Post your your comments below and don't forget to tell us where you are in the world
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-23662651
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